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joe six pack

Spanish translation: ciudadano de a pie

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:joe six pack
Spanish translation:ciudadano de a pie
Entered by: xxxtazdog
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04:10 Jan 24, 2002
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Marketing
English term or phrase: joe six pack
our customer is joe six pack
Ellen Donohue
United States
Local time: 05:40
ciudadano de a pie
Explanation:
It means "the average person".

There's a very interesting text on "joe six pack" at the link below. Here are some excerpts:

Joe Six-Pack Bounces John Q. Public
William Safire, New York Times Service

Only the Devil has more aliases than the average person.

The Chinese call him Old Hundred Names, the Russians Ivan Ivanovich, the French Monsieur Tout le Monde, the Germans Otto Normalburger or Jederman, and the Dutch Elckerlijc. As the man in the street he made his appearance in 1831 and was popularized a decade later by Ralph Waldo Emerson in his essay on self-reliance, playing on John Bunyan's metaphor about the man with the muckrake: "The man in the street does not know a star in the sky."

He signs checks John Doe (on a joint account with Jane Doe); the editor William Allen White in 1937 called him John Q. Public, and in 1883 the Yale sociologist William Graham Sumner named him the forgotten man, a moniker that Franklin Roosevelt adopted while campaigning for president in 1932 (before beer was sold in cardboard containers of six bottles).

His first name soon changed to Joseph. The average Joe appeared as Joe Blow (1867), Joe Doakes (1926), Joe College (1932), GI Joe (1943) and, in Britain, Joe Bloggs (1969). Though Joe Zilch (1925, probably a play on zero) and Joe Schmo (1950, rhyming with hometown Kokomo) are derisive, Joe Cool (1949) gets respect. This assumption that Joe is average seems outdated because Joseph is a given name declining in vogue; if current averageness were the criterion, we might expect the average Michael or Brian Six-Pack.

A six-pack (which still takes a hyphen, but not for long), is a half-dozen bottles or cans, often of beer, packaged to be purchased as a unit. Beer is traditionally Everyman's alcoholic beverage, slurped up noisily or chug-a-lugged breathlessly by those who sneer at effete elitists with "Champagne tastes." Hence the affinity of the plebian Joe with the symbol of beer purchased, in quantity, the six-pack, a word coined in 1952.

"Ciudadano de a pie" is the translation given in Collins for the British "Joe Bloggs" mentioned above, which is synonymous.

Muchas veces los políticos se olvidan de lo que demanda el ciudadano de a pie,
sobre todo los jóvenes, y nosotros vivimos día a día con la cercanía de ...
www.terra.es/joven/articulo/html/jov5520.htm

Hope it helps.
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 11:40
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2un tipo normal y corriente/cualquier hijo de vecinomaria_g
4 +2personas/consumidores/usuarios comunes y corrientes
Eugenia Corbo
5nuestro producto se dirige al consumidor común y corriente
Leticia Molinero
4la persona de promedioGilbert Ashley
4ciudadano de a piexxxtazdog
4un fulano cualquiera
Jackie_A


  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
un tipo normal y corriente/cualquier hijo de vecino


Explanation:
The average guy.

maria_g
Local time: 02:40
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 29

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alis?
36 mins
  -> thanx

agree  Patricia Myers: me gusta cualquier hijo de vecino, es una buena traducción.
4 hrs
  -> gracias! se hace lo que se puede
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
un fulano cualquiera


Explanation:
otra posibilidad.

Ejemplo del 1er sitio de referencia: "...En otro caso de un fulano cualquiera convertido en Rambo..."

Del 2do: "...no postrarse ante dudosos santones, o al impulso de un fulano cualquiera,..."

Saludos...


    Reference: http://www.ciudad.com.ar/ar/portales/juegos/nota_cobranded/0...
    Reference: http://quiron_alvar.tripod.com/juramos.htm
Jackie_A
United States
Local time: 02:40
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 314
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
personas/consumidores/usuarios comunes y corrientes


Explanation:
Yo usaría algo como: "nuestro producto está dirigido a peronas/consumidores/usuarios (según quede mejor en el contexto de tu traducción)comunes y corrientes.

Evitaría palabras como "tipo", "fulano", etc. a menos que el producto esté dirigido específicamente a hombres.


    para que se ditraigan un rato los trasnochadores: www.schnipp.com/six.htm
Eugenia Corbo
Local time: 05:40
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carlos Moreno
7 hrs

agree  Camara: comunes y corrientes
11 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
nuestro producto se dirige al consumidor común y corriente


Explanation:
"joe six pack" se refiere al fulano que compra paquetes de 6 latas de cerveza, un producto de consumo popular diario. En principio, según de qué producto se trate, creo que se dirige intencionalmente al hombre y no a cualquier consumidor. En ese caso se podría decir que "el producto se dirige al hombre de la calle".

Leticia Molinero
Local time: 05:40
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 31
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
ciudadano de a pie


Explanation:
It means "the average person".

There's a very interesting text on "joe six pack" at the link below. Here are some excerpts:

Joe Six-Pack Bounces John Q. Public
William Safire, New York Times Service

Only the Devil has more aliases than the average person.

The Chinese call him Old Hundred Names, the Russians Ivan Ivanovich, the French Monsieur Tout le Monde, the Germans Otto Normalburger or Jederman, and the Dutch Elckerlijc. As the man in the street he made his appearance in 1831 and was popularized a decade later by Ralph Waldo Emerson in his essay on self-reliance, playing on John Bunyan's metaphor about the man with the muckrake: "The man in the street does not know a star in the sky."

He signs checks John Doe (on a joint account with Jane Doe); the editor William Allen White in 1937 called him John Q. Public, and in 1883 the Yale sociologist William Graham Sumner named him the forgotten man, a moniker that Franklin Roosevelt adopted while campaigning for president in 1932 (before beer was sold in cardboard containers of six bottles).

His first name soon changed to Joseph. The average Joe appeared as Joe Blow (1867), Joe Doakes (1926), Joe College (1932), GI Joe (1943) and, in Britain, Joe Bloggs (1969). Though Joe Zilch (1925, probably a play on zero) and Joe Schmo (1950, rhyming with hometown Kokomo) are derisive, Joe Cool (1949) gets respect. This assumption that Joe is average seems outdated because Joseph is a given name declining in vogue; if current averageness were the criterion, we might expect the average Michael or Brian Six-Pack.

A six-pack (which still takes a hyphen, but not for long), is a half-dozen bottles or cans, often of beer, packaged to be purchased as a unit. Beer is traditionally Everyman's alcoholic beverage, slurped up noisily or chug-a-lugged breathlessly by those who sneer at effete elitists with "Champagne tastes." Hence the affinity of the plebian Joe with the symbol of beer purchased, in quantity, the six-pack, a word coined in 1952.

"Ciudadano de a pie" is the translation given in Collins for the British "Joe Bloggs" mentioned above, which is synonymous.

Muchas veces los políticos se olvidan de lo que demanda el ciudadano de a pie,
sobre todo los jóvenes, y nosotros vivimos día a día con la cercanía de ...
www.terra.es/joven/articulo/html/jov5520.htm

Hope it helps.


    Reference: http://www.uta.fi/FAST/US7/NAMES/6-pack.html
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 11:40
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 910
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
la persona de promedio


Explanation:
Another way of saying 'the average person' with no derogatory undertones.

Gilbert Ashley
PRO pts in pair: 228
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