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i have a dog named spot.

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12:42 Jun 3, 2001
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
Medical
English term or phrase: i have a dog named spot.
I HAVE A DOG NAMED SPOT
LEAH
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Summary of answers provided
naVer explicación
Raimundo
naTengo un perro y su nombre es Spot.nephrodoc
naTengo un/a perro/a llamado/a Spot.susu21
naTengo un perro llamado spotsamsi
naYo tengo un perro que se llama Spot.
Xicla
naTengo un perro que se llama Spot
Elinor Thomas


  

Answers


9 mins
Tengo un perro que se llama Spot


Explanation:
Good luck! :-)


    Language knowledge
Elinor Thomas
Local time: 18:20
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 860
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2 hrs
Yo tengo un perro que se llama Spot.


Explanation:
I have a dog named spot!

Xicla

Xicla
Local time: 13:20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: The pronoun YO should not be used.
1 hr
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3 hrs
Tengo un perro llamado spot


Explanation:
you can simply say: tengo un perro llamado spot.

hope this helps
nice regards


    experience
samsi
Local time: 16:20
PRO pts in pair: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: GOOD!!
52 mins
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5 hrs
Tengo un/a perro/a llamado/a Spot.


Explanation:
In this case, it has not been indicated whether the dog is male or female. (Some people name female dogs Spot.)

Grammatically speaking, "un" and "una" are masculine and feminine in gender respectively and both correspond to the English indefine article "a" as well as "an." In Spanish, articles and adjectives, such as the past particple "llamado" or "llamada," must agree with the nouns they modify (describe). That's why there are two ways to say the same sentence in this case. One sentence indicates that the dog is male, the second indicates that the dog in question is female.

Leaving out the personal pronoun "yo" is a good idea since most Spanish speakers do this when the subject of the sentence or phrase is already understood. If you suspect that this is not the case, keep the "yo" in the sentence.


    Spanish major, 3rd year student
susu21
Spain
Local time: 22:20
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15 hrs
Ver explicación


Explanation:
No sé el contexto en el que te mueves

Podría ser "Tengo un perro llamado spot", "Tengo un perro que se llama spot".

Pero lo cierto es que todo eso se resume en una sola frase:

"Tengo un perro CUYO nombre es spot".

Ya sé que el uso del "cuyo" ha quedado restringido al ámbito literario, pero ésa es la traducción correcta.

Si Cervantes empezó con "En un Lugar de La Mancha de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme... nosotros podríamos decir igualmente "En un lugar de ProZ cuyo nombre es Terms Help los Pros solicitan ayuda a otros Pros".

Espero que te valga



Raimundo
Local time: 21:20
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 399
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21 hrs
Tengo un perro y su nombre es Spot.


Explanation:
Of course, there are many ways to translate this sentence:
Tengo un perro cuyo nombre es Spot.
Tengo un perro llamado Spot (me imagino que es perro no perra)
Tengo un perro que se llama Spot.
Mi perro se llama Spot. (If it's really your dog, you don't need to say that you "have him/her", it would be understood)
What does all this have to do with medical translation? I don't know.

nephrodoc
PRO pts in pair: 41
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