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peckerwood

Spanish translation: paleto, blanco sureño racista

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:peckerwood
Spanish translation:paleto, blanco sureño racista
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23:54 Dec 13, 2001
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
/ Fiom: western
English term or phrase: peckerwood
You peckerwoods have just raised hell with our supper.

¿Qué traducción tiene peckerwood? ¿Es algo así como "bastard" o "fool"?
Pablo Fdez. Moriano
Spain
Local time: 10:15
see explanation
Explanation:
Wow, Pablo, you sure get some interesting texts!

The original meaning of “peckerwood” was as follows:

Does anyone know the origin of the word "peckerwood"? I believe it was used by the pre civil war southern slaves.
Hal (and see AnarchoCyberSludge - politics, technology, & music): Also just "Wood." It means Caucasion or American white person, especially in the South. It is old Southern and it used to be usually derogatory (from the common name for the red-headed woodpecker which has red neck.
(From Forbidden American English by Richard A. Spears).
-or-
A poor southern ASP (Anglo Saxon Protestant). The woodpecker symbolizing whites in the South.
(From The Word Lovers Dictionary by Josefa Heifetz (http://plateaupress.com.au/wfw/pecker.htm)

Black Southerners started using the word peckerwood to refer to poor whites some time at the end of the last century. Blacks, writes Clarence Major in his dictionary of African American slang, "saw the common blackbird as a symbol of themselves." The redheaded woodpeckers that roamed the Southern forests came to represent whites. (http://www.thenewrepublic.com/122799/coverstory122799.html)

It is similar to redneck and is often used in combination with redneck. Simon and Schuster gives “blanco inculto de las áreas rurales de los estados del sur (gen. enemigo de los negros)” to explain redneck.

As P. Forgas pointed out, the term has evolved into a synonym for “white supremacist” in some areas, so your translation would depend somewhat on the period when the dialogue takes place. However, in the more traditional or original sense, you might want to say something like “paletos,” or if your text has racial overtones or connotations, “racistas incultos,” maybe.

Hope it helps.
Cindy
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 10:15
Grading comment
Gracias, Luisa. Son muy buenas tus referencias, y también tus soluciones. De hecho, "paleto" era la que había puesto temporalmente, y me quedo con ella.
Gracias, también a los demás, por vuestra inestimable colaboración.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1see explanationxxxtazdog
5blanco pobre que vive entre negrosAndrea Isaak
4paletoChris Williams
4una referencia
P Forgas
4un sureño blanco rural
Hazel Whiteley


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
un sureño blanco rural


Explanation:
This is the literal translation of Mirriam Webster´s definition (see reference).
It is a derogatory term.


    Reference: http://m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary
Hazel Whiteley
Local time: 09:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 675
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
blanco pobre que vive entre negros


Explanation:
Jerga de los E.U

Andrea Isaak
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
una referencia


Explanation:
Peckerwoods

A term first used by blacks in the South to deride white racists, today Peckerwoods also refers to organized racist activity in and out of the nation's prisons. In the late 1980's, recruitment of young men and women in many of the nation's prisons helped lead to the emergence of white power street gangs similar to the neo-Nazi skinheads - with one major difference. Neo-Nazi skinheads disavow any form of drug use. Peckerwoods, like most gangs, earn their money from drug-dealing, clandestine drug labs, and gun-running. The Peckerwood 'style' is derived from both Latino gangs (Pendleton shirts and baggy pants) and Skinheads (Doe Marten boots, flight jackets, and in some instances, shaven heads). Women in this movement are called Featherwoods.

asustador, no?



    Reference: http://www.texaspolicecentral.com/new_lexicon_of_hate.html
P Forgas
Brazil
Local time: 07:15
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 2261
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see explanation


Explanation:
Wow, Pablo, you sure get some interesting texts!

The original meaning of “peckerwood” was as follows:

Does anyone know the origin of the word "peckerwood"? I believe it was used by the pre civil war southern slaves.
Hal (and see AnarchoCyberSludge - politics, technology, & music): Also just "Wood." It means Caucasion or American white person, especially in the South. It is old Southern and it used to be usually derogatory (from the common name for the red-headed woodpecker which has red neck.
(From Forbidden American English by Richard A. Spears).
-or-
A poor southern ASP (Anglo Saxon Protestant). The woodpecker symbolizing whites in the South.
(From The Word Lovers Dictionary by Josefa Heifetz (http://plateaupress.com.au/wfw/pecker.htm)

Black Southerners started using the word peckerwood to refer to poor whites some time at the end of the last century. Blacks, writes Clarence Major in his dictionary of African American slang, "saw the common blackbird as a symbol of themselves." The redheaded woodpeckers that roamed the Southern forests came to represent whites. (http://www.thenewrepublic.com/122799/coverstory122799.html)

It is similar to redneck and is often used in combination with redneck. Simon and Schuster gives “blanco inculto de las áreas rurales de los estados del sur (gen. enemigo de los negros)” to explain redneck.

As P. Forgas pointed out, the term has evolved into a synonym for “white supremacist” in some areas, so your translation would depend somewhat on the period when the dialogue takes place. However, in the more traditional or original sense, you might want to say something like “paletos,” or if your text has racial overtones or connotations, “racistas incultos,” maybe.

Hope it helps.
Cindy



    as noted above
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 10:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 910
Grading comment
Gracias, Luisa. Son muy buenas tus referencias, y también tus soluciones. De hecho, "paleto" era la que había puesto temporalmente, y me quedo con ella.
Gracias, también a los demás, por vuestra inestimable colaboración.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Bullrich
8 hrs
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
paleto


Explanation:
I think you should keep it simple and paleto is nice and simple, the origins of the word apart it's just another way of saying, "ignorant person from a rural background" nowadays or paleto! peon maybe also!

Chris Williams
Local time: 09:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 43
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