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evening

Spanish translation: see my suggestion

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20:16 Jan 13, 2002
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: evening
Can you please tell me at what time is "tarde" & at what time is "evening"?
Sometimes I don't know whether to use tarde or evening. For exem. the time I'm refering to is from
6:30 to 7:30

Thank you so much for your help!
Sandra
Spanish translation:see my suggestion
Explanation:
I always feel that "tarde" is between midday and dinner-time (dinner time being 8.30 or later) whereas "evening" starts around 6 pm. This is really based on the fact that 6 pm is about the earliest that most people in the UK will have dinner. As mentioned above, I'm sure a lot of Proz will disagree with this. "Tarde" and "evening" are very much a question of feel.
Selected response from:

Hazel Whiteley
Local time: 12:03
Grading comment
I'm sorry
I didn't write my question correctly and I confused a lot of you I meant to say I don't know at what time to put
tarde and at what time I should write noche, but anyway you got my point. Some of the answers really confuse me also.
I made up my mind, I think I will use tarde until dark
and if I have to say a time I think I will say 7 de la tarde
y 8 de la noche.

Thanks to all of you!
Here in the USA we usually have dinner around 5:30 to 6:00p.m.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8see my suggestion
Hazel Whiteley
4 +3tarde (till 9:00)Mary Smith
4 +3tarde
Nikki Graham
5 +1VER EXPLICACIÓNAurora Humarán
4 +2tarde
Elena Pérez
5Both are fine. Different languages. What's the problem?Rodri
4 +1tardecita
Sue Horn
5noche
Aida Alvarez
5The word "evening" doesn't exist in Spanish...
GoodWords
5noche
Angel Biojo
5afternoon and evening
Monica Colangelo
2 +2That's what our Spanish teacher said...
Rusinterp
4Early evening or late afternoonosierra
4noche
Elisa Capelão
4nocheelenali


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Early evening or late afternoon


Explanation:
Any specific definition of time is bound to be rejected by more than one 'pro'.

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Note added at 2002-01-13 20:40:29 (GMT)
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Ooops! I didn\'t get it at all! Sorry, guys!

osierra
PRO pts in pair: 48
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
see my suggestion


Explanation:
I always feel that "tarde" is between midday and dinner-time (dinner time being 8.30 or later) whereas "evening" starts around 6 pm. This is really based on the fact that 6 pm is about the earliest that most people in the UK will have dinner. As mentioned above, I'm sure a lot of Proz will disagree with this. "Tarde" and "evening" are very much a question of feel.

Hazel Whiteley
Local time: 12:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 675
Grading comment
I'm sorry
I didn't write my question correctly and I confused a lot of you I meant to say I don't know at what time to put
tarde and at what time I should write noche, but anyway you got my point. Some of the answers really confuse me also.
I made up my mind, I think I will use tarde until dark
and if I have to say a time I think I will say 7 de la tarde
y 8 de la noche.

Thanks to all of you!
Here in the USA we usually have dinner around 5:30 to 6:00p.m.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Myers: I agree with Hazel, for me tarde is until dinner time, in Spain people tend to have dinner late and for us tarde is until 8:30 or so.
21 mins

agree  Ariadna Castillo González: I fully agree with Hazel and Patricia... The Spanish "tarde" is very loooong :)
31 mins

agree  Robert INGLEDEW: evening is after the sun goes down, and therefore is earlier in winter.
36 mins

agree  esetiago: Right,and Susana Campos' answer is right too. That's why in Spanish you can say "A las seis de la tarde ya es de noche" (in winter).
40 mins

agree  kairosz (Mary Guerrero)
42 mins

agree  Magda Miño
1 hr

agree  olv10siq: I fully agree with you too.
3 hrs

agree  pzulaica
11 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
That's what our Spanish teacher said...


Explanation:
Tardes is really afternoon, and noches is evening. It may sound really strange to a non-Spanish speaker (ant it does to me).
I would say noches, particularly if it is dark at that point. When I was in Costa Rica this summer, I said noches starting from about 6, and no one corrected me.

However, I have not been studying Spanish for very long, I am just a student in it, and I may be wrong.


Rusinterp
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kairosz (Mary Guerrero)
41 mins

agree  Angel Biojo: Your notion is the correct one for any Spanish speaker
3 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
noche


Explanation:
roughly the evening is when is getting (sunset) or is already dark and until one goes to bed.
Tarde is obviously afternoon.

regards

Elisa Capelão
Local time: 12:03
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 70
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
noche


Explanation:
En México, de las 12:00 de mediodía a las 6:00 P.M. es tarde.. de las 6:00 P.M. a las 12:00 de medianoche.. es noche.. y de alli otra vez hasta mediodia.. es en la mañana.. asi que las horas de las 6:30 a las 7:30 PM. es en la noche... esto es muy abierto en verano...pues.. cuando a las 6:00 P.M. aun esta claro.. la gente dice.. la tarde!!! Aunque en realidad, devería ser de la noche...:)


    Nativa Mexicana
Aida Alvarez
Mexico
Local time: 04:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 20
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
afternoon and evening


Explanation:
Depende de la época del año. Evening se aplica para el momento del día en que se pone el sol. En invierno a las 6:30 pm sería evening en casi todo el planeta, pero en verano todavía es afternoon-
En pocas palabras, afternoon mientras hay sol; evening para cuando no está más

Monica Colangelo
Argentina
Local time: 09:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 2395
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tarde


Explanation:
I don't quite understand your question, since you want to know the difference between two words in two different languages. But in the specific case of 6:30 to 7:30 I would definitely say "tarde" although it might be dark at that time. Anyway, this is a very personal thing with no set limits.

Elena Pérez
Belgium
Local time: 13:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 134

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
36 mins

agree  Leliadoura
3 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tarde


Explanation:
can be afternoon and evening in English. Tarde starts after lunch (not 12 o'clock as in English), so about 1, or 2, which is when people go for lunch (in my experience in Spain - some go at 1, some go at 2 (businesses), shops close about 2 for the lunch break till about 5). After that it's still tarde until about 8 or 9, when you can switch to using noche. The use of tarde/noche can also depend on how dark it is, i.e., whether it's summer or winter.
So, your time (6:30 to 7:30) would be tarde (and not noche).
Hope this answers your question, because I find it a little confusing!

Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 147

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Myers
14 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Ariadna Castillo González: Fully agree :)
24 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Leliadoura
3 hrs
  -> Gracias
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tarde (till 9:00)


Explanation:
from 6:30 to 7:30 we say 'tarde' in Spanish, regardless is winter or summer, light or dark.

No native speaker would say "las seis de la noche" or "las siete de la noche", we say las seis/siete de la tarde, las ocho de la tarde, and then las nueve de la noche.

Am I wrong?

Mary Smith
Local time: 13:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 96

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Myers: no, you are right :)
2 mins

agree  Ariadna Castillo González: You're not wrong!
9 mins

neutral  Nikki Graham: I don't think you can define it so precisely. This is a very subjective matter and does depend on how much light there is. In summer, at 9 it's still not dark, so it's perfectly possible to say tarde and not noche.
15 mins
  -> Would you say "ayer fui al cine a las nueve de la tarde"? Maybe this is right in any LA country, not sure, but it doesn't sound idiomatic to my Spaniard ears.

agree  olv10siq: I fully agree with you
3 hrs

neutral  Rossana Triaca: hey, here we say "las 8 de la noche", never "tarde" (regardless of season). I agree with 6 and 7 tough.
3 hrs
  -> Gracias. ¡Nunca te acostarás sin saber una cosa más! : -))

neutral  Atenea Acevedo: I'm a native speaker who says "las siete de la noche"... as every Mexican does!
5 hrs
  -> Pues los mexicanos sois mayoría... ¡me rindo! : -))
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
noche


Explanation:
before dark
good evening = salutation
good night = when leaving
ex: if you are arriving to a place at 6:30 or 7:30 you shall use "evening"
if you were to leave the place at that same time you'd say "good night"

elenali
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 17
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tardecita


Explanation:
This option is the perfect solution in Colombia. Don't think it's used universally, however, but it covers dusk when you're not sure if it's the end of the evening or the beginning of the night!

Good luck.



Sue Horn
United States
Local time: 07:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 85

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Aurora Humarán: También en Argentina
16 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
noche


Explanation:
Evening is noche and afternoon is tarde in Spanish.

Angel Biojo
United States
Local time: 04:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 41
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Both are fine. Different languages. What's the problem?


Explanation:
An interesting thing about "Buenos días" and "Buenas tardes", at least in Madrid, is that the former is used up to the time the speaker has had their mid-day meal; after that time they will use the latter. As a joke it's often said: "Para Vd. será buenas tardes, pero para mi, buenos días, que aún no he comido."

Rodri
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
VER EXPLICACIÓN


Explanation:
Creo que la cantidad y diversidad de respuestas confirma que es un tema de países y de percepción.
A mi modo de ver la tarde va (desde el noon, por eso afternoon) hasta que se pone el sol y ahí empieza la noche.
Obviamente que usar o no la palabra tardecita dependerá del tipo de traducción (más o menos coloquial)
Pero... en Argentina (tal como en Colombia como contó Sue Horn más arriba) también hablamos de la tardecita (que sería el período gris entre la tarde y la noche).
Por otro lado como hispano parlante siempre me llamó la atención que Evening se usa para cualquier momento de la noche (por ejemplo en un saludo al público en una fiesta Good Evening Ladies and Gentlemen!) y Good Night como saludo para antes de ir a dormir.
En cambio en español usamos Buenas Noches en ambos casos.
Y... buenos días!

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Note added at 2002-01-14 14:47:53 (GMT)
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Algo interesante: la óptica en función de a qué hora se come en cada país.
En Argentina la hora normal para cenar es las 21 (o sea 9 PM). Esto va para Hazel que si alguna vez viene por Argentina y la invito a cenar a casa no se aparezca a las 6 !!!!!

Aurora Humarán
Argentina
Local time: 09:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 524

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GoodWords
5 mins
  -> =o)
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The word "evening" doesn't exist in Spanish...


Explanation:
...in the same way as it does in English, and that's why can be tricky to know which one to use, until you get used to it.

"Tarde" serves for both "afternoon" and "evening", until nightfall, when it becomes "noche". If you need to make the distinction that you are talking about the evening, not the middle of the night, you can say "nochecita" instead of "noche".

The time you are talking about; approx. 7:00 pm, is definitely "la tarde" (unless you are somewhere where the sun sets extremely early and by that time, it has already been dark for hours!).

As a Canadian English speaker, I understand "afternoon" to run from 12:00 noon to 6:00 pm, and "evening" to start after 6:00 pm. I live in Mexico, and "la tarde" starts at 12:00 noon, and lasts until nightfall, when it becomes "la noche".


GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 06:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1947
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