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laws (english or spanish?)

Spanish translation: Explanation:

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Laws: English or Spanish?
Spanish translation:Explanation:
Entered by: Parrot
Options:
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14:33 Jul 29, 2001
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: laws (english or spanish?)
I am translating a brochure and it has a lot of laws.
My question is:
If they are actual laws do you leave them in english and write the translation in spanish in parenthesis? or just translate everything?
for exemp.

California's School Safety and Security Act

Thanks for your help!
Ramon
This will depend a lot on the client. Presuming the reader
Explanation:
is Spanish, translate the law, AND LEAVE THE ENGLISH IN PARENTHESIS FOR REFERENCE PURPOSES. Usually the content is more important than the title, but if the reader is a lawyer or a professional in the legal practice, he might find it useful to have such data as the name in English, the year enacted, and/or the Official Gazette in which it was published, etc.. If the text is a thesis or a scholarly paper, it is theoretically be better to leave the English as you suggest and simply put the Spanish translation in parenthesis (or in a translator's footnote). If this is a reference in a scholarly paper, you should leave everything in English even though you change the punctuation to accord with Spanish footnoting and bibliographical conventions.
Selected response from:

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 15:56
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +3This will depend a lot on the client. Presuming the reader
Parrot
na +2Ley/Leyes
Terry Burgess
naPerdóname Ramon!!...parece que estoy medio dormido hoy:-)
Terry Burgess
naEstas leyes tienen nombre, por ese motivo las dejaría tal cual están.
Bertha S. Deffenbaugh


  

Answers


5 mins peer agreement (net): +2
Ley/Leyes


Explanation:
Hola Ramón!
Cualquier "Act" o "Law" in inglés se traduce al español como "ley" o "leyes"...sin excepción.

espero te sirva:-)
terry


    Cabanellas-Hoague + experiencia
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 08:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3315

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Clarisa Moraña: I do completely agree
44 mins
  -> Thx Clarisa:-)

agree  Katrin Zinsmeister
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

50 mins peer agreement (net): +3
This will depend a lot on the client. Presuming the reader


Explanation:
is Spanish, translate the law, AND LEAVE THE ENGLISH IN PARENTHESIS FOR REFERENCE PURPOSES. Usually the content is more important than the title, but if the reader is a lawyer or a professional in the legal practice, he might find it useful to have such data as the name in English, the year enacted, and/or the Official Gazette in which it was published, etc.. If the text is a thesis or a scholarly paper, it is theoretically be better to leave the English as you suggest and simply put the Spanish translation in parenthesis (or in a translator's footnote). If this is a reference in a scholarly paper, you should leave everything in English even though you change the punctuation to accord with Spanish footnoting and bibliographical conventions.


    publication experience
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 15:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 330
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Lutteral
6 hrs

agree  xxxtazdog
7 hrs

agree  Eleonora Hantzsch
14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Estas leyes tienen nombre, por ese motivo las dejaría tal cual están.


Explanation:
Por otra parte , traducidas al español, carecen de sentido y el lector sencillamente NO LAS PUEDE IDENTIFICAR.

¿Qué ley es esta que no la conozco? piensan los lectores fuera de USA. Y con razón!

Saludos y suerte,

BSD

Bertha S. Deffenbaugh
United States
Local time: 07:56
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 743
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Perdóname Ramon!!...parece que estoy medio dormido hoy:-)


Explanation:
Es que no leí bien tu pregunta...discúlpame!!

Estoy totalmente de acuerdo con Cecilia y Bertha...o sea, que lo traduzcas al español y que pongas enseguida, entre paréntesis, el título original en inglés..para así poder identificarla fácilmente.

Saludos:-)
terry


    Anterior
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 08:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3315
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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