sew pillows under his armholes

Spanish translation: hacerle más fácil el camino al cielo

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:sew pillow under his armholes
Spanish translation:hacerle más fácil el camino al cielo
Entered by: Bill Greendyk
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19:46 May 8, 2003
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Religion / Religion
English term or phrase: sew pillows under his armholes
"The true believer cannot be plastered over with untempered mortar; he will not let man or woman *sew pillows under his armholes*; he cannot be satisfied with the opinions of men, nor daubed over with an empty profession of religion."

Otro frase de un predicador inglés del siglo XIX, donde está insistiendo en la imposibilidad de que la verdadera fe sea una basada en las opiniones del hombre.
Gracias de antemano por la ayuda!
Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 05:46
el verdadero creyente no dejará que ninguna barrera intercepte sus creencias o fé
Explanation:
Hola Billy,
Sólo una idea. Seguro que hay muchas otras interprentaciones y traducciones posibles.
Por mientras te copio este artículo interesante acerca precisamente de las diferentes maneras de interpretar esta frase.
Buena suerte y saludos del Oso ¶:^)

"Text:  Ezekiel 13:18
"Woe to the women that sew pillows to all armholes, and make kerchiefs upon the head of every stature to hunt souls."

This verse discusses a custom that may not be satisfactorily explained, but here are some suggestions.

In ancient times, soft pillows (kesathot) were sewn to the armholes ('assilim) --or the elbows-- of divans. Among the poorer class of people, sheep or goat skins were fused for the pillow covering and chaff or wool for the stuffing. Among the richer class, a richly embroidered or costly fabric was used and a soft stuffing was used. Placed on a divan or bed, they made a luxurious resting place for the arms. (See 2 Kings 1:4 and Amos 3:12)

Expensive pillows often furnished the apartments of wealthy women in Eastern countries. Here they sat, leaned, rested their heads, or propped their arms upon them by tucking them into their sides. Being overly-pillowed is sometimes an illusion to a careless, voluptuous lifestyle, or a state of softness.

A second interpretation is that instead of armholes or pillows, the rendering should be literal: "joints of hands".(Gesenius and Fairbarin. They suggest that the meaning to be that God stretched out his hands in order to punish sin, the false prophets covered God's hands by their heterodox teaching, so that God's hands would not seem to be able to grasp the rebellious offenders.

The ancient versions and the Targums 'hand or hands'. If the possessive pronoun is intended, then the verse would convey and interesting thought that these false prophetesses being spoken of were attempting to restrain the hands of God.

A third interpretation comes from an earlier writer who suggests that the false prophetesses referred to in this text are practicing divination and that the pillows were amulets which were fitted to their sleeves to aid them in their work.

Historically, there is no evidence of this last claim or that any such custom ever existed.

Later in verse 20, we have the indication that the pillows were not made simply for the arms, but were somehow attached to the arm; even so, there is no adequate information to associate this practice with divination.

As to Kerchiefs, Mispachoth) has several translation: cushions, quilts, coverings for the head, long flowing robes or mantles or veils.

The general conception of the word is that is denotes a large covering for the head of costly value. Some translators think that these head covering were designed to add to the luxury and attractiveness of the wicked prophetesses who wore them, while others believe that the veils were worn by those who came to consult the prophetess...perhaps a uniform of the followers.

Dr. John Kitto mad an interesting commented (1866-1867) by associating this text with the worship practice of Astarte. The figure of the goddess is always shown wearing an elaborate head-dress.

Another thought is that the translation of this text is giving a symbolic picture of these elaborate pillows or cushions covering or being in the hands of Jehovah and that Jehovah then places these head-dresses on the heads of the ungodly people to mark them as unrighteous and to receive divine judgment.

Then carrying the idea further, the wicked prophetesses endeavors to neutralize the blow of Jehovah's judgment, not only by covering his hands, but also by covering the heads of the sinful. This is a rather involved idea and difficult to substantiate.

One last interpretation is that the 'mispachoth' is similar to the 'mitpachoth of Is. 3:22; also known as 'wimples'.

Again, in Dr. Kitto's work, attention to the closeness of the two words is discussed and also makes mentions the fact that in verse 21, the 'mispachoth are shown to be articles that can be worn. He adopts the opinion of 'Kimichi' who says the 'mispachoth' were loose robes such as ancient goddesses wore and the false prophetesses are now represented as wearing, wrapping themselves form head to toe.

Thus 'kerchiefs up on the head of every stature" would read, "robes of every length on the head'; or these women who lived luxurious made use of elegant and well-fitting robes.

The action taking place in the verse appears to be a warning by God that these false prophetesses are victimizing those to turn to them and God will not tolerate either the prophetesses or their followers."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-08 20:16:28 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Gracias a ti, Billy.
¡Un abrazo!
Oso ¶:^)
Selected response from:

xxxOso
Grading comment
¡Oso! Ni sabía que venía de una cita bíblica! Eso me ayudó mucho, porque busqué las explicaciones de la cita en varios comentarios bíblicos que tengo, y llegué a lo que querría decir nuestro autor. ¡Gracias, mi amigo!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3el verdadero creyente no dejará que ninguna barrera intercepte sus creencias o fé
xxxOso


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
el verdadero creyente no dejará que ninguna barrera intercepte sus creencias o fé


Explanation:
Hola Billy,
Sólo una idea. Seguro que hay muchas otras interprentaciones y traducciones posibles.
Por mientras te copio este artículo interesante acerca precisamente de las diferentes maneras de interpretar esta frase.
Buena suerte y saludos del Oso ¶:^)

"Text:  Ezekiel 13:18
"Woe to the women that sew pillows to all armholes, and make kerchiefs upon the head of every stature to hunt souls."

This verse discusses a custom that may not be satisfactorily explained, but here are some suggestions.

In ancient times, soft pillows (kesathot) were sewn to the armholes ('assilim) --or the elbows-- of divans. Among the poorer class of people, sheep or goat skins were fused for the pillow covering and chaff or wool for the stuffing. Among the richer class, a richly embroidered or costly fabric was used and a soft stuffing was used. Placed on a divan or bed, they made a luxurious resting place for the arms. (See 2 Kings 1:4 and Amos 3:12)

Expensive pillows often furnished the apartments of wealthy women in Eastern countries. Here they sat, leaned, rested their heads, or propped their arms upon them by tucking them into their sides. Being overly-pillowed is sometimes an illusion to a careless, voluptuous lifestyle, or a state of softness.

A second interpretation is that instead of armholes or pillows, the rendering should be literal: "joints of hands".(Gesenius and Fairbarin. They suggest that the meaning to be that God stretched out his hands in order to punish sin, the false prophets covered God's hands by their heterodox teaching, so that God's hands would not seem to be able to grasp the rebellious offenders.

The ancient versions and the Targums 'hand or hands'. If the possessive pronoun is intended, then the verse would convey and interesting thought that these false prophetesses being spoken of were attempting to restrain the hands of God.

A third interpretation comes from an earlier writer who suggests that the false prophetesses referred to in this text are practicing divination and that the pillows were amulets which were fitted to their sleeves to aid them in their work.

Historically, there is no evidence of this last claim or that any such custom ever existed.

Later in verse 20, we have the indication that the pillows were not made simply for the arms, but were somehow attached to the arm; even so, there is no adequate information to associate this practice with divination.

As to Kerchiefs, Mispachoth) has several translation: cushions, quilts, coverings for the head, long flowing robes or mantles or veils.

The general conception of the word is that is denotes a large covering for the head of costly value. Some translators think that these head covering were designed to add to the luxury and attractiveness of the wicked prophetesses who wore them, while others believe that the veils were worn by those who came to consult the prophetess...perhaps a uniform of the followers.

Dr. John Kitto mad an interesting commented (1866-1867) by associating this text with the worship practice of Astarte. The figure of the goddess is always shown wearing an elaborate head-dress.

Another thought is that the translation of this text is giving a symbolic picture of these elaborate pillows or cushions covering or being in the hands of Jehovah and that Jehovah then places these head-dresses on the heads of the ungodly people to mark them as unrighteous and to receive divine judgment.

Then carrying the idea further, the wicked prophetesses endeavors to neutralize the blow of Jehovah's judgment, not only by covering his hands, but also by covering the heads of the sinful. This is a rather involved idea and difficult to substantiate.

One last interpretation is that the 'mispachoth' is similar to the 'mitpachoth of Is. 3:22; also known as 'wimples'.

Again, in Dr. Kitto's work, attention to the closeness of the two words is discussed and also makes mentions the fact that in verse 21, the 'mispachoth are shown to be articles that can be worn. He adopts the opinion of 'Kimichi' who says the 'mispachoth' were loose robes such as ancient goddesses wore and the false prophetesses are now represented as wearing, wrapping themselves form head to toe.

Thus 'kerchiefs up on the head of every stature" would read, "robes of every length on the head'; or these women who lived luxurious made use of elegant and well-fitting robes.

The action taking place in the verse appears to be a warning by God that these false prophetesses are victimizing those to turn to them and God will not tolerate either the prophetesses or their followers."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-08 20:16:28 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Gracias a ti, Billy.
¡Un abrazo!
Oso ¶:^)


    Reference: http://www.angelfire.com/or3/ancientbiblehistory/cushionsker...
xxxOso
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 84
Grading comment
¡Oso! Ni sabía que venía de una cita bíblica! Eso me ayudó mucho, porque busqué las explicaciones de la cita en varios comentarios bíblicos que tengo, y llegué a lo que querría decir nuestro autor. ¡Gracias, mi amigo!
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