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company man, derrickman, roughneck

Spanish translation: *

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01:11 Jan 14, 2002
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / Drilling crew (oil and gas)
English term or phrase: company man, derrickman, roughneck
Cuadrilla de perforación.
Las otras funciones son driller y toolpusher.
A veces no me resulta claro si son operarios o supervisores.
1) Company man: ¿supervisor de la compañía?
2) Driller; perforador
3) Toolpusher: jefe de la cuadrilla de perforación
4) Derrickman: ¿operario o supervisor de la torre de perforación?
5) Roughnecks: ¿operarios?

Desde ya, muchas gracias.

Roberto
Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 08:00
Spanish translation:*
Explanation:
Here's what I've found:


****Rig Crews*****


Most of the job descriptions below pertain to a typical semi-submersible drilling rig crew. However, most disciplines are also found on jack-ups, drillships and production platforms


Offshore Installation Manager (OIM); has often worked his way up through the drill crew ranks. He is in overall charge of the rig. Hence sometimes called "Person In Charge" (PIC).

Toolpusher - works in the rig offices and the rig floor. He also has responsibilities on the main deck. He is usually an experienced driller.

Company Man - is the oil company's on board representative. He is not employed by the drilling company operating the rig. On a drilling rig an oil company employee works with the drilling company to supervise its interests, helping the strategy for drilling the well.

Driller - has a high level of responsibility, and is in charge of everything happening on and above the rig floor. He is the man that actually operates the drilling equipment, making the hole in the sea bed. Which is the reason the rig is there in the first place.

Assistant Driller - has many tasks to perform most vary depending on particular drilling operation being carried out at the time. He is direct supervisor for the Derrickman and Roughnecks. process room at all times.

Derrickman - is responsible for the maintenance and smooth operation of the mud pumps and mud holding pits among other machines in the mud pump room. Also assists the Roughnecks when very busy on drill floor and not required in the pump room. This is the man who will climb the derrick, the tall drilling tower, to assist racking drill pipe when it is being pulled out of the hole.

Roughneck - works on the rig floor in a team of three and is responsible for the operation of equipment and machines as required by the particular operation being carried out at that time by the driller. While drilling, one Roughneck is present in the mud

Subsea Engineer - is responsible for the Blow Out Preventer (BOP) unit and the motion compensation system of the rig among other duties.

Assistant Subsea Engineer - can sometimes be promoted from Roughnecks. More usually from a mechanical background.

Crane operator - is responsible for all crane operations on the rig and to/from the supply boats. He is supervisor to his assistant and the Roustabout crew.

Assistant Crane Operator - is an experienced Roustabout who is also qualified to operate the cranes and will often be next in line for promotion to Crane Operator when a position arises.

Roustabout - main duties include guiding the crane as loads are moved about the deck, supplying equipment to the rig floor as requested and keeping pipe deck and main deck areas clean and tidy. Will also assist Roughnecks on the drill floor when required. This usually only happens when the Roughnecks are too busy to get a meal break. The Roustabout will get his meal, then go to the drill floor allowing one Roughneck to get his break. Then each Roughneck swaps out until everyone has eaten.

Radio Operator - Modern radio systems dictate the need for a GMDSS Radio Operator's Licence. Responsible for onboard communications systems, helicopter logistics, preparation of Personnel On Board lists, lifeboat and emergency muster lists, T-Cards etc. Since the advent of modern radio the radio operator's job has changed tremendously. A good modern Radio Operator will have excellent PC skills, good admin skills and must be able to get along with people as the radio room will be the focal point for most peoples communications in and out of the rig. They also get landed with other administrative jobs that no-one else seems to have the time for. He might also be find himself labeled as resident I.T. tutor / network administrator.

Medic - They are rarely doctors but have a high level of medical training. Some are former nurses. On some smaller rigs they double up as a Rig Safety & Training Co-ordinator (RSTC). They are responsible for the upkeep of the Sick Bay and the medical stocks, issuing medicines like a pharmacist. Most rigs now carry out medical checks on all employees every six months or so. Keeping of rig medical records. The rig also has designated first aiders in every crew.

Maintenance supervisor - either has an electrical or mechanical background and oversees the whole maintenance crews work.

Electrician - responsible for all electrical equipment onboard the rig right down to the changing of light bulbs within the accommodation.

Mechanic - responsible for all mechanical equipment onboard, including the drilling package.

Motorman - general engine room duties ensuring smooth running of rig power.

Instrument Technician - responsible for calibration of measurement equipment etc.

Barge Engineer - is in charge of control room operations. He will often be a time served Master Mariner from the Merchant Navy who has crossed over into the oil industry. Responsible for stability of the rig, anchor handling operations during a rig move, supply vessel operations and the like.

Control Room Operator (CRO) - Barge Engineer's assistant.

Painter - Given his work by the Barge Engineer, the Painter is responsible for the rig painting program. Like the Forth Road Bridge it is a never ending job. Often working at heights with scaffolding safety harness and or work basket hoisted by the crane. Usually builds his own scaffolding. May have an assistant, especially if the rig does not have a Maintenance Roustabout squad.

Maintenance Roustabout - main duties include general upkeep and cleaning of deck area of rig. Also painting.

Maintenance Foreman - responsible for overseeing a Maintenance Roustabout Crew’s work.

Welder - They are permanently on one rig and carry out all day to day repairs and building of new metalwork. They are always busy. When there is a big project often a squad of welders are hired to finish the job quickly. These guys move from rig to rig wherever their company has a contract. It’s fair to say that Welders are responsible for the majority of fires onboard drilling rigs

Rig Safety & Training Co-ordinator (RSTC) - There is a lot of responsibility. A job for someone who is a good communicator and has good organisational and computer skills. You will also require full knowledge of the offshore safety laws and company policies.

Materialsman/Storeman - Responsible for the maintenance of the stores and stock ordering and receiving. Must be computer literate. One drawback of this job is that on smaller rigs with only one stores person they sometimes have to get up at all hours to check the cargo coming off the boat.

Camp Boss - in overall charge of the catering department. Oversees the chefs, steward/esses

Chef - day to day cooking duties, reports to the Camp Boss

Night Cook / Baker - very important position on the rig. All bread onboard is baked by the night cook/baker.

Scaffolders - are not tied to any one rig. They go to different installations depending on where their company has work.

Mud Engineer - is in charge of the drilling fluids being used. S/he will likely have a degree in chemistry and will have a good knowledge of drilling procedures.


HTH


By the way:
*company man used to mean "a male worker more loyal to management than to his fellow workers; also, one who informs on fellow employees. For example, He'll never join in a strike; he's a company man. Dating from the 1920s, a period of considerable labor unrest, this term uses company in the sense of "a business concern" and was often applied as a criticism by supporters of labor unions"
(American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-14 02:36:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The site is quite remarkable, too. The webmaster himself works off-shore since 1990!

www.cleddau.com


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-14 02:43:00 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

More reference:
Oilfield Lore (just an article)
http://www.crt.state.la.us/FOLKLIFE/creole_art_oilfield_lore...

Petroleum Glossary
http://www.depoman.com/petroleum_glossary.htm





...and Good Luck! :ñ)
Selected response from:

AndrewBM
Ireland
Local time: 11:00
Grading comment
Although you did not provide the translation, the information you enclosed is excellent. Thank you so much.
Robert
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2*
AndrewBM
4 +1representante de la compañía, encuellador, cuñeroSusana Cahill
4 +1Una contribución
P Forgas
4...capataz, torrero, peón de torre...
Ramón Solá
4pls read below.
laurab


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pls read below.


Explanation:
hi robert, I think roughnecks are trabajadores en una explotación petrolifera.Derrickman should be the obrero, I never heard operario, but then I'm in Mexico so i don't knoe about Spain. Don't know the other one, sorry. bye

laurab
Mexico
Local time: 05:00
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 14
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
*


Explanation:
Here's what I've found:


****Rig Crews*****


Most of the job descriptions below pertain to a typical semi-submersible drilling rig crew. However, most disciplines are also found on jack-ups, drillships and production platforms


Offshore Installation Manager (OIM); has often worked his way up through the drill crew ranks. He is in overall charge of the rig. Hence sometimes called "Person In Charge" (PIC).

Toolpusher - works in the rig offices and the rig floor. He also has responsibilities on the main deck. He is usually an experienced driller.

Company Man - is the oil company's on board representative. He is not employed by the drilling company operating the rig. On a drilling rig an oil company employee works with the drilling company to supervise its interests, helping the strategy for drilling the well.

Driller - has a high level of responsibility, and is in charge of everything happening on and above the rig floor. He is the man that actually operates the drilling equipment, making the hole in the sea bed. Which is the reason the rig is there in the first place.

Assistant Driller - has many tasks to perform most vary depending on particular drilling operation being carried out at the time. He is direct supervisor for the Derrickman and Roughnecks. process room at all times.

Derrickman - is responsible for the maintenance and smooth operation of the mud pumps and mud holding pits among other machines in the mud pump room. Also assists the Roughnecks when very busy on drill floor and not required in the pump room. This is the man who will climb the derrick, the tall drilling tower, to assist racking drill pipe when it is being pulled out of the hole.

Roughneck - works on the rig floor in a team of three and is responsible for the operation of equipment and machines as required by the particular operation being carried out at that time by the driller. While drilling, one Roughneck is present in the mud

Subsea Engineer - is responsible for the Blow Out Preventer (BOP) unit and the motion compensation system of the rig among other duties.

Assistant Subsea Engineer - can sometimes be promoted from Roughnecks. More usually from a mechanical background.

Crane operator - is responsible for all crane operations on the rig and to/from the supply boats. He is supervisor to his assistant and the Roustabout crew.

Assistant Crane Operator - is an experienced Roustabout who is also qualified to operate the cranes and will often be next in line for promotion to Crane Operator when a position arises.

Roustabout - main duties include guiding the crane as loads are moved about the deck, supplying equipment to the rig floor as requested and keeping pipe deck and main deck areas clean and tidy. Will also assist Roughnecks on the drill floor when required. This usually only happens when the Roughnecks are too busy to get a meal break. The Roustabout will get his meal, then go to the drill floor allowing one Roughneck to get his break. Then each Roughneck swaps out until everyone has eaten.

Radio Operator - Modern radio systems dictate the need for a GMDSS Radio Operator's Licence. Responsible for onboard communications systems, helicopter logistics, preparation of Personnel On Board lists, lifeboat and emergency muster lists, T-Cards etc. Since the advent of modern radio the radio operator's job has changed tremendously. A good modern Radio Operator will have excellent PC skills, good admin skills and must be able to get along with people as the radio room will be the focal point for most peoples communications in and out of the rig. They also get landed with other administrative jobs that no-one else seems to have the time for. He might also be find himself labeled as resident I.T. tutor / network administrator.

Medic - They are rarely doctors but have a high level of medical training. Some are former nurses. On some smaller rigs they double up as a Rig Safety & Training Co-ordinator (RSTC). They are responsible for the upkeep of the Sick Bay and the medical stocks, issuing medicines like a pharmacist. Most rigs now carry out medical checks on all employees every six months or so. Keeping of rig medical records. The rig also has designated first aiders in every crew.

Maintenance supervisor - either has an electrical or mechanical background and oversees the whole maintenance crews work.

Electrician - responsible for all electrical equipment onboard the rig right down to the changing of light bulbs within the accommodation.

Mechanic - responsible for all mechanical equipment onboard, including the drilling package.

Motorman - general engine room duties ensuring smooth running of rig power.

Instrument Technician - responsible for calibration of measurement equipment etc.

Barge Engineer - is in charge of control room operations. He will often be a time served Master Mariner from the Merchant Navy who has crossed over into the oil industry. Responsible for stability of the rig, anchor handling operations during a rig move, supply vessel operations and the like.

Control Room Operator (CRO) - Barge Engineer's assistant.

Painter - Given his work by the Barge Engineer, the Painter is responsible for the rig painting program. Like the Forth Road Bridge it is a never ending job. Often working at heights with scaffolding safety harness and or work basket hoisted by the crane. Usually builds his own scaffolding. May have an assistant, especially if the rig does not have a Maintenance Roustabout squad.

Maintenance Roustabout - main duties include general upkeep and cleaning of deck area of rig. Also painting.

Maintenance Foreman - responsible for overseeing a Maintenance Roustabout Crew’s work.

Welder - They are permanently on one rig and carry out all day to day repairs and building of new metalwork. They are always busy. When there is a big project often a squad of welders are hired to finish the job quickly. These guys move from rig to rig wherever their company has a contract. It’s fair to say that Welders are responsible for the majority of fires onboard drilling rigs

Rig Safety & Training Co-ordinator (RSTC) - There is a lot of responsibility. A job for someone who is a good communicator and has good organisational and computer skills. You will also require full knowledge of the offshore safety laws and company policies.

Materialsman/Storeman - Responsible for the maintenance of the stores and stock ordering and receiving. Must be computer literate. One drawback of this job is that on smaller rigs with only one stores person they sometimes have to get up at all hours to check the cargo coming off the boat.

Camp Boss - in overall charge of the catering department. Oversees the chefs, steward/esses

Chef - day to day cooking duties, reports to the Camp Boss

Night Cook / Baker - very important position on the rig. All bread onboard is baked by the night cook/baker.

Scaffolders - are not tied to any one rig. They go to different installations depending on where their company has work.

Mud Engineer - is in charge of the drilling fluids being used. S/he will likely have a degree in chemistry and will have a good knowledge of drilling procedures.


HTH


By the way:
*company man used to mean "a male worker more loyal to management than to his fellow workers; also, one who informs on fellow employees. For example, He'll never join in a strike; he's a company man. Dating from the 1920s, a period of considerable labor unrest, this term uses company in the sense of "a business concern" and was often applied as a criticism by supporters of labor unions"
(American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-14 02:36:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The site is quite remarkable, too. The webmaster himself works off-shore since 1990!

www.cleddau.com


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-14 02:43:00 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

More reference:
Oilfield Lore (just an article)
http://www.crt.state.la.us/FOLKLIFE/creole_art_oilfield_lore...

Petroleum Glossary
http://www.depoman.com/petroleum_glossary.htm





...and Good Luck! :ñ)



    Reference: http://www.cleddau.com/rigcrews.html
AndrewBM
Ireland
Local time: 11:00
PRO pts in pair: 26
Grading comment
Although you did not provide the translation, the information you enclosed is excellent. Thank you so much.
Robert

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Esperanza Clavell: how very useful! Una cantidad abrumadora de información. Buenísimo
20 mins
  -> Todo gracias a la telaraña del internet

agree  Stavanger: Excellent
13 hrs
  -> gracias Stavanger
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Una contribución


Explanation:
http://www.crt.state.la.us/FOLKLIFE/creole_art_oilfield_lore...

Este sitio vale por la información sobre las funciones de cada trabajador en una perforación, pero mucho más por la literatura.

Suerte, P.

P Forgas
Brazil
Local time: 09:00
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 2261

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AndrewBM: sí me encanta este género de cosas
8 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
representante de la compañía, encuellador, cuñero


Explanation:
Robert, en Colombia se utilizan estos términos. Te agrego otros de un glosario de cargos en taladros de perforación - comunes en Colombia igualmente.

Company Man Company Man (representante de la compañía operadora)

toolpusher toolpusher (representante de la compañía perforadora)

tourpusher tourpusher
pusher tourpusher

floorman supervisor

driller perforador

derrickman encuellador
monkeybird encuellador

floorhand cuñero
rig hand cuñero
roughneck cuñero


patio hand obrero de patio/patiero
roustabout obrero de patio/patiero

shakerman/hands recogemuestras
sample catcher recogemuestras

Como verás, con frecuencia se prefiere el término en inglés porque los trabajadores los aprenden de los extranjeros y los siguen utilizando así.

espero te sirvan algunos.

saludos, Susana


Susana Cahill
United States
Local time: 04:00
PRO pts in pair: 87

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AndrewBM: excelente
55 mins
  -> gracias Andrew

agree  Gilbert Ashley
11 hrs
  -> gracias Gilbert

disagree  Stavanger: Estoy bastante segura de que no se emplea el término "encuellador" en España.
12 hrs
  -> probablemente no, por eso especifiqué que estos términos se emplean en Colombia. No sé a qué público está destinida la traducción.
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
...capataz, torrero, peón de torre...


Explanation:
In that order.
Take a look below...


    Reference: http://europa.eu.int/eurodicautom/login.jsp
Ramón Solá
Local time: 05:00
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3952
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