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en foule

English translation: en foule

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:en foule
English translation:en foule
Entered by: Victoria Britten

09:29 Jul 13, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Agriculture / Viticulture
French term or phrase: en foule
I'm subtitling an interview with a wine grower, who explains that, "Autrefois, les vignobles été tenus ***en foule***, c'est-à-dire les pieds dans tous les sens," and "[le vigneron] ne pouvait maîtriser le terrain. Il pouvait maîtriser de façon très locale. Il avait un tout petit morceau de terre un peu grasse, il grattait les cailloux, il faisait une toute petite terrasse, il plantait trois pieds, dix pieds, il en plantait quinze. C'est ce qu'on appelait la plantation ***en foule***."
Victoria Britten
France
Local time: 13:28
en foule
Explanation:
I'm finding an awful lot of English texts and glossaries about wine that use the French term for this, and although some of them give an English translation there doesn't seem to be one generally accepted English equivalent: you get "literally 'in a crowd'", "huddled together", "randomly positioned", and various other things. But if the French term is well established in the English-speaking wine world, as many French terms are, and the context defines it, why bother with a translation at all? There's also a certain ambiguity about whether the main idea is randomly positioned or close together, and it would be convenient to avoid having to commit yourself on that.

A token English reference:

"Work was made more difficult by the system of planting en foule. Regional vigerons, like their counterparts in Burgundy and the Jura, continued to plant en foule until after the turn of the century. The term en foule derives from the disordered arrangement of the vines, likened to a "crowd" (foule) of people, but it eventually came to signify a "large number", because in this type of growing, the density of vines and shoots is much higher than with vines planted in rows"
https://books.google.es/books?id=Hu-mOnd9UqUC&pg=PT126&lpg=P...


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Note added at 4 days (2018-07-18 06:57:58 GMT) Post-grading
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Thank you, Victoria!
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:28
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4en foule
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
en foule


Explanation:
I'm finding an awful lot of English texts and glossaries about wine that use the French term for this, and although some of them give an English translation there doesn't seem to be one generally accepted English equivalent: you get "literally 'in a crowd'", "huddled together", "randomly positioned", and various other things. But if the French term is well established in the English-speaking wine world, as many French terms are, and the context defines it, why bother with a translation at all? There's also a certain ambiguity about whether the main idea is randomly positioned or close together, and it would be convenient to avoid having to commit yourself on that.

A token English reference:

"Work was made more difficult by the system of planting en foule. Regional vigerons, like their counterparts in Burgundy and the Jura, continued to plant en foule until after the turn of the century. The term en foule derives from the disordered arrangement of the vines, likened to a "crowd" (foule) of people, but it eventually came to signify a "large number", because in this type of growing, the density of vines and shoots is much higher than with vines planted in rows"
https://books.google.es/books?id=Hu-mOnd9UqUC&pg=PT126&lpg=P...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2018-07-18 06:57:58 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you, Victoria!

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:28
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Charles, that's extremely helpful!

Asker: And here are your points, with thanks once again!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  phi2barre
6 hrs
  -> Merci !

agree  Kevin Oheix
9 hrs
  -> Merci, Kevin !

agree  Yolanda Broad
1 day 13 hrs
  -> Thank you, Yolanda :-)

agree  ph-b: "But if the French term is well established in the English-speaking wine world, as many French terms are, and the context defines it, why bother with a translation at all?" How refreshing!
1 day 19 hrs
  -> Thank you, ph-b! Trying to be realistic :-)
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