chaînes opératoires de débitages laminaire, à éclats et lamellaire

English translation: Of the two

21:32 Oct 27, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Archaeology / Aurignacian
French term or phrase: chaînes opératoires de débitages laminaire, à éclats et lamellaire
My (French-speaking) client has proposed various changes to my translation of an abstract concerning an archaeological study. Below is the original French, followed by my translation and then their proposed version.

L’examen lithotechnologique de l’industrie lithique a permis de mettre en évidence différentes chaînes opératoires de débitages laminaire, à éclats et lamellaire.

A lithotechnological study of the lithic industry has revealed different operation sequences for laminar debitage, involving both flakes and bladelets.

A lithotechnological study of the lithic industry has revealed different “chaînes opèratoires” for flakes, blades and bladelets debitage.

Does this mean that “operation sequences” is not a good translation for “chaînes opèratoires”? (Surely it is better to find an English term than keep the French one?) Also, the end of the sentence in the client's version doesn’t seem correct to me. I would appreciate any other views. Many thanks in advance.
Alan Campbell
Local time: 00:18
English translation:Of the two
Explanation:
I prefer yours, but think "manufacturing sequence" or "sequence of manufacture" rolls better off the tongue.

Kraft and Blenk (1974) suggested a date range between 3690 BC and 3900 BC for tear drop points before any radiocarbon-dated assemblages were available. More recently, dates from Sites 28GL15 and 28GL148 in southern New Jersey have produced a range of dates from 1480 to 220 BC (Mounier and Martin 1994:132), and a SEQUENCE OF MANUFACTURE for this type
www.deldot.gov/static/projects/archaeology/ drawyer_creek_south_site/07_Chapter6.pdf

If a bifacial point shows the same MANUFACTURING SEQUENCE as unifacial points, ... Flenniken,JJ and JPWhite 1985 Australian flaked stone tools: a ...
arts.anu.edu.au/arcworld/ resources/papers/paapapers/endpoint.htm
Also, I don't think "débitage" is the word required here. In English it seems to refer solely to the waste products resulting from production of stone tools, while in French it means both this and what I think is intended here, the "production" of tools.

Without a lot of research I don't know the terms used for the various techniques, but "(flint) knapping" comes to mind. I wonder if this might be used instead of "débitage". However, I understand there is a difference between "striking" the stone to break a piece off and applying pressure to achieve a different result, and don't know where "knapping" fits into the scheme of things. Food for thought, though!

Irrespective of the "débitage" issue, "flakes, blades and bladelets debitage" is simply not idiomatic. It would be improved by removing the final esses.

Also, your formulation suggests that "débitage laminaire" breaks down into two subsets, i.e. "à éclats" & "lamellaire". I know nothing about the subject, but reading the French I understand:

débitages (de type) (1)laminaire, (2) à éclats et (3) lamellaire, which is what the client's modification suggests.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2005-10-27 22:23:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Debitage: All of the waste material, such as stone chips and flakes, produced during the manufacture and repair of stone tools. Debitage is often the most ...
www.sfu.museum/journey/ 05p_secondary/glossary/page_d1.html

débitage : opération de taille de la pierre utilisant différentes techniques, la principale étant la percussion
http://www.mcc.gouv.qc.ca/pamu/champs/archeo/archisto/glossa...

Débitage:
Les déchets, tels que fragments et minuscules éclats de pierre, produits lors de la fabrication et de la réparation d’outils de pierre. Le débitage est souvent l’artefact le plus commun trouvé sur des sites préhistoriques, et peut être étudié pour déterminer la technique de taille utilisée par le fabricant d’outils
http://www.sfu.museum/journey/fr/mod/05p_secondary/glossary/...

Débitage Levalloisien : Nouveau mode de débitage de la pierre qui apparaît, ...
perso.wanadoo.fr/nicole.rolin/prehistoire/ Pages/Pr%E9sentation%20du%20Pal%E9olithique.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 4 mins (2005-10-27 22:37:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I must say I have enjoyed doing a few minutes research on this, for I came across I name I had forgotten, that of François Bordes of the University of Bordeaux, a world expert on stone tool production, whom I met and saw knapping on a dig near Souillac in 1977. I had even partied in his house in Bordeaux, having been briefly acquainted with his son's girlfriend at the time. Fond memories of youth!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 49 mins (2005-10-27 23:21:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Catherine, ô Catherine, donne-moi de l'aspirine" :-) were words of a song written and sung by the band of which Arnaud Bordes was the drummer (?)(if memory serves), Catherine P. being the beautiful blonde girlfriend! It is all flooding back ...
Selected response from:

Bourth (X)
Local time: 01:18
Grading comment
Brilliant - thanks so much for your help and all the useful background info. I agree about "manufacturing sequence" and the use of the word "knapping" - I much prefer it to "debitage" - it's just that it seems to be so widely used in English texts, I'm never sure which is more correct. Oh, and thanks so much for picking up on my misunderstanding - I'd interpreted the comma as a colon. The sentence makes so much more sense now, and I'm very grateful to you for your help. Thank you also for sharing your memories of the 1970s - that made me chuckle!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4Of the two
Bourth (X)


  

Answers


47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
chaînes opératoires de débitages laminaire, à éclats et lamellaire
Of the two


Explanation:
I prefer yours, but think "manufacturing sequence" or "sequence of manufacture" rolls better off the tongue.

Kraft and Blenk (1974) suggested a date range between 3690 BC and 3900 BC for tear drop points before any radiocarbon-dated assemblages were available. More recently, dates from Sites 28GL15 and 28GL148 in southern New Jersey have produced a range of dates from 1480 to 220 BC (Mounier and Martin 1994:132), and a SEQUENCE OF MANUFACTURE for this type
www.deldot.gov/static/projects/archaeology/ drawyer_creek_south_site/07_Chapter6.pdf

If a bifacial point shows the same MANUFACTURING SEQUENCE as unifacial points, ... Flenniken,JJ and JPWhite 1985 Australian flaked stone tools: a ...
arts.anu.edu.au/arcworld/ resources/papers/paapapers/endpoint.htm
Also, I don't think "débitage" is the word required here. In English it seems to refer solely to the waste products resulting from production of stone tools, while in French it means both this and what I think is intended here, the "production" of tools.

Without a lot of research I don't know the terms used for the various techniques, but "(flint) knapping" comes to mind. I wonder if this might be used instead of "débitage". However, I understand there is a difference between "striking" the stone to break a piece off and applying pressure to achieve a different result, and don't know where "knapping" fits into the scheme of things. Food for thought, though!

Irrespective of the "débitage" issue, "flakes, blades and bladelets debitage" is simply not idiomatic. It would be improved by removing the final esses.

Also, your formulation suggests that "débitage laminaire" breaks down into two subsets, i.e. "à éclats" & "lamellaire". I know nothing about the subject, but reading the French I understand:

débitages (de type) (1)laminaire, (2) à éclats et (3) lamellaire, which is what the client's modification suggests.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2005-10-27 22:23:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Debitage: All of the waste material, such as stone chips and flakes, produced during the manufacture and repair of stone tools. Debitage is often the most ...
www.sfu.museum/journey/ 05p_secondary/glossary/page_d1.html

débitage : opération de taille de la pierre utilisant différentes techniques, la principale étant la percussion
http://www.mcc.gouv.qc.ca/pamu/champs/archeo/archisto/glossa...

Débitage:
Les déchets, tels que fragments et minuscules éclats de pierre, produits lors de la fabrication et de la réparation d’outils de pierre. Le débitage est souvent l’artefact le plus commun trouvé sur des sites préhistoriques, et peut être étudié pour déterminer la technique de taille utilisée par le fabricant d’outils
http://www.sfu.museum/journey/fr/mod/05p_secondary/glossary/...

Débitage Levalloisien : Nouveau mode de débitage de la pierre qui apparaît, ...
perso.wanadoo.fr/nicole.rolin/prehistoire/ Pages/Pr%E9sentation%20du%20Pal%E9olithique.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 4 mins (2005-10-27 22:37:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I must say I have enjoyed doing a few minutes research on this, for I came across I name I had forgotten, that of François Bordes of the University of Bordeaux, a world expert on stone tool production, whom I met and saw knapping on a dig near Souillac in 1977. I had even partied in his house in Bordeaux, having been briefly acquainted with his son's girlfriend at the time. Fond memories of youth!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 49 mins (2005-10-27 23:21:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Catherine, ô Catherine, donne-moi de l'aspirine" :-) were words of a song written and sung by the band of which Arnaud Bordes was the drummer (?)(if memory serves), Catherine P. being the beautiful blonde girlfriend! It is all flooding back ...

Bourth (X)
Local time: 01:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 57
Grading comment
Brilliant - thanks so much for your help and all the useful background info. I agree about "manufacturing sequence" and the use of the word "knapping" - I much prefer it to "debitage" - it's just that it seems to be so widely used in English texts, I'm never sure which is more correct. Oh, and thanks so much for picking up on my misunderstanding - I'd interpreted the comma as a colon. The sentence makes so much more sense now, and I'm very grateful to you for your help. Thank you also for sharing your memories of the 1970s - that made me chuckle!
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