en appareil de calcaire à chaînage

English translation: surrounds

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:en appareil de calcaire à chaînage
English translation:surrounds
Entered by: Neil Rear

19:26 Apr 15, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Architecture
French term or phrase: en appareil de calcaire à chaînage
Les portes, traitées, comme les fenêtres, en appareil régulier de calcaire à chaînage, sont sobrement décorées de frontons de demi-lunes (description of an old building in France)
Neil Rear
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:22
surrounds
Explanation:
They are talking about the door and window surrounds (encadrement). In this case, they are made of limestone (calcaire) blocks, in contrast to the rest of the wall which could be brick or render, etc.

"Appareil" is the layout of the blocks, the pattern, the bond. Quite what an "appareil régulier" is, other than "regular/plain pattern", I don't know. Window and door surrounds often alternate larger and smaller stones, or wider and narrower widths of brickwork, both for appearance and to provide good keying with the surrounding wall material. "Régulier" might quite possibly be just this, as opposed to something more complicated, or with "alternations" of different distances, e.g one course of large (wide) stone, 2 courses of smaller (less wide) stones, but I really cannot say.

"A Chaînage" would normally be "with masonry reinforcement", but I can't say if this was common practice long ago in the past or whenever your building was built. Quite possibly it was, since Roman constructions in Gaul used iron bars to tie their masonry together (not realizing that contrary to their other realms, Gaul was not that subject to earthquakes) (after the Romans left, the locals chipped away at the stone to retrieve the precious iron). However, that does not mean that in the millenium or so that followed the practice of using masonry reinforcement was continued.

Masonry reinforcement is iron bars or chains placed at intervals in the mortar course between masonry units, or at some other location, to hold the masonry (which, unlike iron or steel, has practically not tensile strength) together.

So:
the door (surround)s, handled in the same way as the window (surround)s, with a regular (?) bond pattern of limestone units tied with masonry reinforcement, are soberly decorated ...

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Note added at 2 days 40 mins (2005-04-17 20:07:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also \"dressings\" (such stonework etc. round doors and windows) for the \"surround\":

door dressings handled in the same way as the window dressings, with a regular (?) bond pattern of limestone units tied with masonry reinforcement, are soberly decorated
Selected response from:

Bourth (X)
Local time: 21:22
Grading comment
Thanks Bourth! With your explanation it makes more sense.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1surrounds
Bourth (X)


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
en appareil de calcaire à chaînage
surrounds


Explanation:
They are talking about the door and window surrounds (encadrement). In this case, they are made of limestone (calcaire) blocks, in contrast to the rest of the wall which could be brick or render, etc.

"Appareil" is the layout of the blocks, the pattern, the bond. Quite what an "appareil régulier" is, other than "regular/plain pattern", I don't know. Window and door surrounds often alternate larger and smaller stones, or wider and narrower widths of brickwork, both for appearance and to provide good keying with the surrounding wall material. "Régulier" might quite possibly be just this, as opposed to something more complicated, or with "alternations" of different distances, e.g one course of large (wide) stone, 2 courses of smaller (less wide) stones, but I really cannot say.

"A Chaînage" would normally be "with masonry reinforcement", but I can't say if this was common practice long ago in the past or whenever your building was built. Quite possibly it was, since Roman constructions in Gaul used iron bars to tie their masonry together (not realizing that contrary to their other realms, Gaul was not that subject to earthquakes) (after the Romans left, the locals chipped away at the stone to retrieve the precious iron). However, that does not mean that in the millenium or so that followed the practice of using masonry reinforcement was continued.

Masonry reinforcement is iron bars or chains placed at intervals in the mortar course between masonry units, or at some other location, to hold the masonry (which, unlike iron or steel, has practically not tensile strength) together.

So:
the door (surround)s, handled in the same way as the window (surround)s, with a regular (?) bond pattern of limestone units tied with masonry reinforcement, are soberly decorated ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days 40 mins (2005-04-17 20:07:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also \"dressings\" (such stonework etc. round doors and windows) for the \"surround\":

door dressings handled in the same way as the window dressings, with a regular (?) bond pattern of limestone units tied with masonry reinforcement, are soberly decorated

Bourth (X)
Local time: 21:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 539
Grading comment
Thanks Bourth! With your explanation it makes more sense.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
0 min
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