culot

English translation: console / cul-de-lampe

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:culot
English translation:console / cul-de-lampe
Entered by: French Foodie

12:17 Apr 28, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Architecture
French term or phrase: culot
In reference to sculptures on columns.

Le décor des culots avec des tetes grotesques, comme celui des chapiteaux ornés de feuillages, est rustique et puissant.

I know exactly what this is: Support d'une retombée d'ogive quand celle-ci ne repose pas sur une colonne
and have a picture of one here:
http://medieval.mrugala.net/Villes/Chauvigny (86)/Chauvigny ...

I found a site on castles that translates this as bracket, as in a small supporting block to carry a projecting weight, but this doesn't sound quite right to me here.

Any ideas?
French Foodie
Local time: 05:42
console
Explanation:
All corbels are brackets but not all brackets are corbels.

A console is a special type of corbel, which is what you have in the Chauvigny example.

"Console" is the term in common Art Historical usage.

Here's the Oxford English Dictionary on the subject, with instances of use:

CONSOLE
1. a. Arch. A variety of the bracket or corbel; applied more particularly to an ornamental chock of uniform breadth or face, its profile a straight-lined or scroll-shaped figure or foliage (usually an ogee curve terminating in a volute above and below), surmounted by a horizontal tablet; fixed upright against a wall or other surface and serving singly as a ledge to support something.

1706 PHILLIPS, Console (Fr. in Masonry), a kind of Bracket or Shouldering-piece that juts out, and serves to support a Cornice, or to bear up Figures, Busts, Vessels and other Ornaments of the like Nature.
1835 BECKFORD Alcobaca & B. in Miss Yonge Cameos (1877) II. xiv. 159 The graceful arching of the roof, unsupported by console or column.
c1856 Archit. Publ. Soc. Dict. s.v. Bracket, The difference between a block, a cantilever, a console, a modillion, a mutule, and a tassel, depends chiefly upon the place in which each of these varieties of the bracket or corbel is employed. Ibid., Console..an ornament in any material which projects about half its height or less, for the purpose of carrying anything.

Selected response from:

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 23:42
Grading comment
I went with console, but I think cul-de-lampe is worth putting in the glossary as well. Thanks to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3bracket
suezen
4 +1cul de lampe
Bourth (X)
5console
Christopher Crockett
3 +2corbel
Kate Hudson
2base
LAB2004


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
base


Explanation:
It seems like it is something fairly solid, and 'base' is a possible translation for culot.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2006-04-28 12:29:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

We do talk about the base of a statue.

LAB2004
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: My worry here is that base would be confused with the bottom of the column, whereas this is at the top.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christopher Crockett: Mara's objection is valid, I'm afraid. A culot is not a "base".
31 mins
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
bracket


Explanation:
In my dictionary of architecture, a bracket is described as a small supporting piece of stone or other material, often formed of scrolls or volutes (but in your case grotesques) to carry a projecting weight.
It also gives me corbel, but I think bracket is probably more correct here

suezen
Local time: 05:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Goward: Dicobat also gives "bracket"
11 mins
  -> thanks David

agree  architran: "organe en surplomb portant une charge, formé d'un seul élément taillé en cône, pyramide renversée, quart de sphère ..(souvent) feuillagé ou figuré (Vocabulaire d'Architecture, 1969)
21 mins
  -> thanks architran

agree  Leny Vargas: or maybe support bracket? http://facstaff.uww.edu/henigec/smab/pages/subjectdesc.cfm?s...
22 mins
  -> thanks lennybee

neutral  Christopher Crockett: It is a *type* of bracket, but a specific one, called a "console".
29 mins
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
corbel


Explanation:
Could this be it?
corbel - a projecting bracket, sometimes carved and decorated, used to help support weight from above.
http://www.newyorkcarver.com/Glossary.htm

Kate Hudson
Netherlands
Local time: 05:42
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, this is the idea, but a culot is a type of corbel: http://vernon-visite.org/colleg/info/glossaire.htm corbeau : pièce assez grossière en saillie qui reçoit les retombées d'un arc, donc sorte de chapiteau engagé ou de console . Si la pièce est taillée en cône ou pyramide renversé on parle de culot


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, it is a type of corbel. Called a console.
30 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  gad
1 day 5 hrs
  -> Thanks
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
console


Explanation:
All corbels are brackets but not all brackets are corbels.

A console is a special type of corbel, which is what you have in the Chauvigny example.

"Console" is the term in common Art Historical usage.

Here's the Oxford English Dictionary on the subject, with instances of use:

CONSOLE
1. a. Arch. A variety of the bracket or corbel; applied more particularly to an ornamental chock of uniform breadth or face, its profile a straight-lined or scroll-shaped figure or foliage (usually an ogee curve terminating in a volute above and below), surmounted by a horizontal tablet; fixed upright against a wall or other surface and serving singly as a ledge to support something.

1706 PHILLIPS, Console (Fr. in Masonry), a kind of Bracket or Shouldering-piece that juts out, and serves to support a Cornice, or to bear up Figures, Busts, Vessels and other Ornaments of the like Nature.
1835 BECKFORD Alcobaca & B. in Miss Yonge Cameos (1877) II. xiv. 159 The graceful arching of the roof, unsupported by console or column.
c1856 Archit. Publ. Soc. Dict. s.v. Bracket, The difference between a block, a cantilever, a console, a modillion, a mutule, and a tassel, depends chiefly upon the place in which each of these varieties of the bracket or corbel is employed. Ibid., Console..an ornament in any material which projects about half its height or less, for the purpose of carrying anything.



Christopher Crockett
Local time: 23:42
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 79
Grading comment
I went with console, but I think cul-de-lampe is worth putting in the glossary as well. Thanks to all!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cul de lampe


Explanation:
A 'culot' is a small 'cul de lampe', defined by SOED as "An ornamental support of inverted conical form".

For the Dictionnaire d'Architecture by Lavenu & Mataouchek:

culot - Petit cul-de-lampe constitué d'une seule assise
cul-de-lampe - Ouvrage en encorbellement ou organe en surplomb pour supporter un élément en saillie, la retombée d'un arc ou de nervures.

The diagrams show such an inverted conical "bracket" or "corbel" as described in the SOED. A "culot" extends over the depth of a single course of stone, while the "cul de lampe" extends over 2, 3, or more.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs (2006-04-29 00:32:26 GMT)
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Also:

cul de lampe - a corbel resembling the conical bottom of ancient lamps. corbel, truss - (architecture) a triangular bracket of brick or stone ...
www.thefreedictionary.com/cul de lampe


You could call it a "corbel" or "bracket" if the shape is of no significance.

For more on corbelling see:

Details on corbelling at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corbel


Bourth (X)
Local time: 05:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Cul-de-lamp is Excellent. Definitly *not* a bracket.
15 hrs
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