SUE

English translation: AFA (Aerodynamic Free Area)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:SUE
English translation:AFA (Aerodynamic Free Area)
Entered by: Charles Davis

11:01 Feb 18, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Architecture / Architect\'s Due Diligence Report
French term or phrase: SUE
10 – La sécurité
Désenfumage des locaux (activités logistiques, local charges batteries)
Cellules à température ambiante, combles des cellules réfrigérées : désenfumées naturellement (SUE totale des DENFC = 2% et 0,5 < SUE < 6 m² pour 250 m² de superficie projetée de toiture)

SUE = Surface utile d'ouverture du dispositif d'évacuation (SUE ou Aa) : produit, exprimé en m2, de la surface géométrique et du coefficient de débit.

I'm wondering if there is a short English equivalent that I can use to avoid a translator's note - Aa, perhaps, though in my research, I haven't come across Aa in this context. Is it the GFA (Geometric free area)?
Keith Jackson
France
Local time: 22:47
AFA (Aerodynamic Free Area)
Explanation:
See discussion comments and reference. "Aa" in the ST, given as a synonym of SUE, must stand for Aerodynamic area, but "aerodynamic free area", the term used (with the same definition) in BS EN 12101-2, looks preferable.
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Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:47
Grading comment
Thanks, Charles!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4AFA (Aerodynamic Free Area)
Charles Davis
Summary of reference entries provided
Article on ventilation opening area technology
Charles Davis

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


3 days 1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
AFA (Aerodynamic Free Area)


Explanation:
See discussion comments and reference. "Aa" in the ST, given as a synonym of SUE, must stand for Aerodynamic area, but "aerodynamic free area", the term used (with the same definition) in BS EN 12101-2, looks preferable.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:47
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
Thanks, Charles!
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Reference comments


48 mins
Reference: Article on ventilation opening area technology

Reference information:
"3 EXISTING TERMINOLOGY
Table 1 details terms used to describe the areas of PPOs [purpose provided ventilation openings] in a number of international and national documents relevant to the design of natural ventilation systems. Here, user guidance for well-known software tools is included because they are an integral part of the design process.
The table shows that there are matters of uncertainty regarding term definitions, contradictions, and deviations. Firstly, terms are used without definition in several guideline documents (CIBSE, 2002; 2005; 2007; 2015; AIC, 1981), software guidance (Walton & Dols, 2014; DoE, 2015a,b), text books (Hensen & Lamberts, 2011; Mumovic & Santamouris, 2009; Oughton & Wilson, 2015), and national standards (BSI, 1991). Here the reader must interpret the term using their own domain knowledge or a companion document. The latter approach can be problematic because some documents give different definitions of the same terms; for example, ASHRAE (2013) defines the term effective area using Equation (2) whereas CIBSE (2005) uses Equation (4). It is interesting to note that CIBSE (2005) introduces uncertainty into its definition (see Table 1) thus asserting that other definitions may exist. One national standard (BSI, 1991) defines the term equivalent area but also uses the undefined term effective equivalent area. This is potentially confusing, especially if one is aware of differing definitions of effective and equivalent areas; see Section 2.
Further divergence in terms occurs in documents pertaining to non-standard PPOs such as smoke ventilators. For example, the statutory document B2 (ADB2) (H.M. Government, 2010b) uses the term aerodynamic free area to describe an area based on the length ݀d2 (shown in Figure 3) and is the same as the definition of free area given by Equation (1). ADB2 also states that an aerodynamic free area can be “declared […] in accordance [with] BS EN 12101-2”. However, EN 12101-2 (BSI, 2003a) defines aerodynamic free area as the “product of the geometric area multiplied by the coefficient of discharge”, which is the same as the definition of effective area described by Equation (2). EN 12101-2 also uses the term geometric area whose definition is equivalent to that of the free area described by Equation (1). Similarly, AIVC GU03 (Liddament, 1996) uses the terms cross sectional and openable area in place of the free area described by Equation (1). These are all direct contradictions that only serve to confuse the reader and lead to engineering failures.
These examples demonstrate the importance of clear terminology; for example, it is possible that the term aerodynamic, used by ADB2 and EN 12101-2, is unhelpful because it is not clear why a particular area is more or less aerodynamic than any other. They also highlight the importance of defining a term before it is used. The statutory Approved Document F (H.M. Government, 2010a) gives clear definitions of free and equivalent areas (and other key terms in a glossary) that agree with the European standard EN 12792 (BSI, 2003b). The text book Ventilation of Buildings (Awbi, 2003) includes a glossary of the terms free and equivalent areas at the beginning of its chapter on air diffusion devices that agree with those given in Equations (1) and (2), respectively. Accordingly, any error in their application is solely the responsibility of the reader."
Benjamin Jones et al., "A review of ventilation opening area terminology" (Energy and Buildings · March 2016), pp. 7-8
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Benjamin_Jones10/public...

You may have to be registered on ResearchGate to download this.

Charles Davis
Spain
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
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