danse savante

12:50 Apr 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting
French term or phrase: danse savante
histoire de la danse savante
Emma


Summary of answers provided
5academic dance
David Vaughn
5History of dance as taught by masters...
Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
3 +1classical dance
forli
3 +1danse savante
PB Trans
5 -1history of cultured dance
Miguel Falquez-Certain
3courtly dance
Gwac


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
history of cultured dance


Explanation:
n/a

Miguel Falquez-Certain
United States
Local time: 08:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: as opposed to uncultured dance? 100% confidence, no refs and not a single trace of the concept on Google. can you explain how you arrived at this answer?
7 mins
  -> savante means highbrow, cultured. Ballet as opposed to popular dance.

disagree  David Vaughn: highbrow OK, but "cultured dance" is simply not used in English, and the construction is not normal English - the adjective is "cultivated".
2 hrs

neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X): sprouted? ....:)
3 hrs
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
classical dance


Explanation:
would be better left untranslated but in general "danse savante" is used to distinguish classical dance from "popular dance"


    Reference: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200304/cmselect/c...
forli
Local time: 13:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X): I agree..but I think i would say as taught by a master..dance master..o
3 hrs

agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, but it depends upon the specific context --could it be "Modern Dance", as taught by a "Master", as Jane suggests? If not, then "Classical" as opposed to "Popular" of "Folk", etc.
3 hrs

disagree  David Vaughn: La danse classique exists in French, so danse savante is a choice by the author. If we had the text of the book, we could determine if "classical" coincides, but it seems likely that it doesn't. But the choice of savante may be a transfer from musique...
4 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
History of dance as taught by masters...


Explanation:
Dance masters....:)

I would be wary of classical here....

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Note added at 3 hrs 35 mins (2005-04-17 16:26:13 GMT)
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Modern danse in the US has Masters....but it is not classical per se though most \"advanced\" dancers have taken classical dance...

Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 89

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Vaughn: Your points are well taken, but your suggested translation is rather awkward - and doesn't follow your own objections, because modern dance teachers are never called "dance masters". Also such a title would be a book about the teachers - not about dance.
1 hr
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
danse savante


Explanation:
I'd leave it in French, with an explanation in English.

See this link:
The three stages of evolution in dance, that we have briefly referred to above, reflect the functions and forms peculiar to the art: imitative in primitive dance, expressive for folk or popular dance, and finally, abstract, i.e. "scholarly" or danse savante.

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Note added at 3 hrs 42 mins (2005-04-17 16:33:07 GMT)
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In appears in French here also: http://www.c3.hu/~dienesbu/france.doc


    Reference: http://auguste.vestris.free.fr/Essays/Character.html
PB Trans
Local time: 13:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X): is this translated from the French? evolution in dance/ development of dance...abstract? danse? sorry but..just italicize it..no need for anything else..it's would be understood..
3 mins
  -> The point is... leave the term in French and find an explanation for the term in English (that fits the asker's context) / Yes, I agree. If it just appears in a title, I would leave it in French and italicize.

neutral  David Vaughn: Your French link seems to be a bibliography - not the vestris site text. Otherwise, what would your explanation in English be?
1 hr
  -> The point is... the term should be left in French.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
academic dance


Explanation:
Particularly in France - where the French Academy guided classical ballet for a couple centuries. But the term is also used for Classical Indian dancing, for example. Savante is simply the idea that an expert teaches and maintains the form.

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Note added at 5 hrs 20 mins (2005-04-17 18:10:37 GMT)
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\"Academic\" is the most neutral term. Having a twenty year career as a dancer and choreographer (both in the US & in France, with a degree in dance from the University of California) doesn\'t give me god\'s truth, but I will claim some experience in this field. In France, the word savante applies to a \"schooled\" or \"learned\" approach to dance, differing from social dancing and folk dance. The word is of course controversial, because it is most often used in a manner that is both elitist and ethnocentric - jazz dance and show dance, as well as classical dance from other cultures, are often excluded. Some authors consider classical ballet to be the only true danse savante, where others will differ. Furthermore, there is resonance with the term \"musique savante\", which is most often used to refer to 20th century \"classical\" music - Webern & Boulez - even if it is considered to encompass older music.

David Vaughn
Local time: 14:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 289

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X): ..you mean the Royal Danse Academy..Académie Française is usually understood to mean the language guys...
2 hrs
  -> I didn't say Académie Française. In French dance texts, it is most often referred to as l'Académie - I specified "French" because there are other Royal Dance Academies.
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
courtly dance


Explanation:
This is just a suggestion and as a translation I think only suitable if in specific reference to the dance practised by members of the court/nobility. I've come accross this problem before with "musique savante" which in fact seemed to refer to nothing more than "classical music", hence, even though "classical dance" is not perfect either as a translation, it may be the simplest solution.

Gwac
Local time: 14:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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