reposer sur des pieds (here)

English translation: freestanding / rest on feet

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:reposer sur des pieds
English translation:freestanding / rest on feet
Entered by: Helen Shiner

11:25 Dec 17, 2020
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / Historical tapestries
French term or phrase: reposer sur des pieds (here)
In a description of 17th-century French tapestries made in the Beauvais factory in 1689, describing artistic composition. Context: "Le décor de ces tapisseries fait échos aux fêtes royales et spectacles qui se déroulaient dans les jardins de Versailles sous Louis XIV. En effet, jusque dans la composition on peut observer que les décors **reposent sur des pieds** rappelant leur caractère éphémère et mobile." "Decors" I presume refers to the setting of the tapestry picture, but how can that be resting on feet? Is it scenery (as on web page https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O124918/tapestry-monnoyer... Thanks in advance for any help.
Nicky Over
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:36
(the decorative panels) rest on feet
Explanation:
See my discussion comments

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Note added at 42 mins (2020-12-17 12:08:19 GMT)
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Or, to be honest, I think I would translate it as “the decorative panels are freestanding”.

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Note added at 44 mins (2020-12-17 12:09:53 GMT)
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The point being made is that they weren’t permanently installed somewhere.
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:36
Grading comment
Thanks very much for your help
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4(the decorative panels) rest on feet
Helen Shiner
3the scenery rests on casters
Mpoma
3resting on (their) feet
Ana Vozone
3stand on legs
Conor McAuley
3 -1Are placed on a stand
ormiston


Discussion entries: 25





  

Answers


39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
(the decorative panels) rest on feet


Explanation:
See my discussion comments

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2020-12-17 12:08:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or, to be honest, I think I would translate it as “the decorative panels are freestanding”.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 44 mins (2020-12-17 12:09:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The point being made is that they weren’t permanently installed somewhere.

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:36
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 340
Grading comment
Thanks very much for your help

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  ormiston: The term 'feet' sounds slightly odd
1 hr
  -> Look at the image is all I can say. However, I have said I prefer ‘freestanding’.

agree  philgoddard: Legs are longer, but I think either would do.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, though now we discover they are on feet + casters ;-)

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: "Freestanding" was what sprung to mind for me too, casters or not, the way the term is used in the extract posted, it works well. If casters are mentioned later, then of course you'll have the chance to do likewise. ;-)
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nikki. I hope it gets round the issue.

agree  Michele Fauble: Freestanding
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Michele

agree  writeaway
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, writeaway :-)

agree  Rachel Fell
10 hrs
  -> Thank you, Rachel

disagree  Mpoma: Sorry I can see no evidence of any panels anywhere. Too much surmising.
5 days
  -> Sorry you can’t see the image. And anyway, this is not relevant for the question asked.
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
stand on legs


Explanation:
Tables and chairs have legs, presumably so do these items.

Feet is a false friend.

Possibly not unlike the banners used at marches and demonstrations, like the one here: https://www.alamy.com/trade-unions-gather-together-to-march-...

Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 12:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Helen Shiner: Feet is not a false friend. It is often used in the decorative arts.
2 mins
  -> Not one of my specialist subject areas, just trying to help out -- will take your word for it.

neutral  Tony M: When you look at them, they are very short, stumpy 'legs', and I think are better referred to as 'feet', just as they might on say a sideboard.
5 days
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
resting on (their) feet


Explanation:
As suggested initially in my discussion.

Ana Vozone
Local time: 11:36
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  ormiston: Like horses?!
1 hr
  -> No, like furniture ... Really? https://www.google.com/search?q="resting on feet" furniture&...

neutral  Tony M: Would be quite wrong if you add 'their'; otherwise, identical to Helen's earlier answer.
5 days
  -> I suppose you agree with "resting on feet"?
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Are placed on a stand


Explanation:
I think this conveys the idea, and a stand can be moved around.

ormiston
Local time: 12:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Helen Shiner: Except they are not, if you look at the image./I posted a better link in the discussion box, since Nicky seems to have disappeared.
12 mins
  -> I can't access it!

neutral  Ana Vozone: Please check the link ....
42 mins

disagree  Tony M: Definitely no sign of a 'stand' anywhere here.
5 days
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5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the scenery rests on casters


Explanation:
Décors means nothing more nor less than EN scenery. This is consistent with the image, and it is also consistent with the ST: "fait échos aux fêtes royales et spectacles qui se déroulaient"...

Like Conor I am a little dubious about Helen's choice of "feet". She gives no evidence for helf slightly overly self-confident assertion that it is "often used in the decorative arts". Maybe it is, but maybe not in this precise context.

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Note added at 5 days (2020-12-22 17:41:44 GMT)
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PS there might in fact be a case for saying something like "the scenery element rests on casters": it may be preferable if the English word is a countable singular noun, since this is what we see in the tapestry, even if the French uses the plural décors.

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Note added at 5 days (2020-12-22 18:12:37 GMT)
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PPS but then again, the example link to that specific V&A tapestry is slightly distracting. Considering the ST alone, "scenery" is probably fine.

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Note added at 6 days (2020-12-24 10:36:41 GMT) Post-grading
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Actually, after having downloaded the V&G image and zoomed in a lot (it is quite hi-res), I have come to the conclusion that these are not in fact casters/ors, but in fact pointy elements (made of wood presumably). In view of this, it is too much to surmise that the ST is referring to "castors" when it says pieds. OTOH there is no doubt, for all the reasons given in my discussion entries, that this concerns "scenery" or "scenery elements", not screens.

Mpoma
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:36
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Eaxctly, as I said, I think these 'scenic elements' could be referred to collectively as 'scenery'; I think I'd favour 'stand' on castors rather than 'rest', which to me suggests something rather more fortuitous.
50 mins
  -> Thanks, and your 2 points are spot on: British EN seems to favour "castors" (whoops) and, yes, see what you mean about "stand".

disagree  Helen Shiner: Castors were patented in the 1870s./ Wheels are not castors. This is not trolling; it is specialist knowledge.
1 hr
  -> Haha, who's trolling now? "Moving large items with wheels has been around since the early existence of ancient civilization. ... in 1876, casters were first patented...". Fortunately I find this sort of lunacy great fun... (see discussion: 1748)
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