à l’endroit

English translation: the right way round / the normal (way round)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:à l’endroit
English translation:the right way round / the normal (way round)
Entered by: Susan McDonald

06:52 Nov 29, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks
French term or phrase: à l’endroit
This phrase occurs in a document describing the method for fine-tuning the time delay thresholds for what they call "Point de Rosée Inverse". Here is some context (and what the document says about "Point de Rosée Inverse"):

"Notion de Point de Rosée Inverse :
Comme son nom l’indique le Point de Rosée Inverse est l’inverse du phénomène du PdR à l’endroit, c’est-à-dire lorsque l’eau commence à se condenser.
La température est la même (55-60°C) que pour le passage du PdR à l’endroit mais cette fois-ci sur une chute de celle-ci pendant l’arrêt moteur.
La calibration du point de rosée inverse pour la motorisation EB consiste à déterminer un seuil temporel à atteindre pour considérer un début de condensation de l’eau autour des sondes à oxygènes et ainsi couper le chauffage de celles-ci. C’est donc dans un but de protection composant que nous utilisons le terme point de rosée inverse."

Further on in the document, there is more information:

"Comme vu précédemment le but de cette méthodologie est donc de déterminer un seuil équivalent au temps indiquant le passage du point de rosée inverse pour d’une part une température d’air à l’arrêt et d’autre part un temps entre le PdR franchi à l’endroit et l’arrêt moteur, qui seront nos 2 axes de nos cartographies."

It's this "à l’endroit" that is giving me the problem. Does it mean "one way" - i.e. in one direction? I can't seem to find a set phrase around dew point which would cover this. As every, your insights would be most welcome!
Susan McDonald
France
Local time: 07:48
the right way round / the normal (way round)
Explanation:
Nither of those long-winded expressions would sit well "as is" in your text, but I'm sure you could adapt the notion to fit.
'à l'endroit' here opposes 'inverse' = 'the wrong way round', i.e. 'not normal'; when talking about 2-sided objects, like fabric, one of course says 'à l'envers', which wouldn't of course sit so well with a 'dew point'
Normally, I would expect a dew point to relate to a falling temperature, so the suggestiong seems to be that this is to do with the temperature rising; though I can't quite see the relevance of that, given that there must be a huge hysteresis between the dew forming and its evaporating again!. But then I'm not an expert in the field :-)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 07:48
Grading comment
Thanks, Tony! I used "normal" in the end, as it fitted pretty well with the context and was a neat solution - also the client liked it, so tant mieux!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1the right way round / the normal (way round)
Tony M
1 +1downwards
rokotas


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
downwards


Explanation:
It looks for me a good choice for this case, especially if you call the opposite "à l'envers" 'upwards'.
Meaning that the temperature goes down for the point de rosée à l'endroit.

rokotas
Local time: 08:48
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GILOU
21 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the right way round / the normal (way round)


Explanation:
Nither of those long-winded expressions would sit well "as is" in your text, but I'm sure you could adapt the notion to fit.
'à l'endroit' here opposes 'inverse' = 'the wrong way round', i.e. 'not normal'; when talking about 2-sided objects, like fabric, one of course says 'à l'envers', which wouldn't of course sit so well with a 'dew point'
Normally, I would expect a dew point to relate to a falling temperature, so the suggestiong seems to be that this is to do with the temperature rising; though I can't quite see the relevance of that, given that there must be a huge hysteresis between the dew forming and its evaporating again!. But then I'm not an expert in the field :-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 07:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 476
Grading comment
Thanks, Tony! I used "normal" in the end, as it fitted pretty well with the context and was a neat solution - also the client liked it, so tant mieux!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch
20 mins
  -> Thanks, B!

neutral  rokotas: @ falling temperature: that's why I suggested downwards vs upwards. However, I like your version, too, Tony
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, rokotas! I think that's really over-interpretation, and a bit risk in this instance.
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