pastille d'animation

English translation: animated interstitial

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:pastille d'animation
English translation:animated interstitial
Entered by: Charles Davis

07:40 Sep 21, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama / genres
French term or phrase: pastille d'animation
This appears in a series of examples of "œuvres cinématographiques ou audiovisuelles" in a copyright contract.

Given as ("film de long métrage, série, court-métrages, pastilles d’animation, etc.").

Since I understand the "pastille" form as a button, it doesn't make much sense - any help appreciated. TIA!
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 09:08
animated interstitials
Explanation:
After lengthy consideration, I think this is the best option. None of the others proposed here fully convinces me, but I think this one ticks the boxes, as they say.

What do we know about "pastilles"? They are short, no more than a very few minutes, they are basically TV-related (actually radio too), and they are a programming phenomenon: they are interspersed between longer programmes, and sometimes occur as interludes in the course of a longer programme.

Let's recall the definitions already cited:

"En jargon télévisuel, une pastille est un programme court, très court (deux minutes ou moins), souvent intercalé entre deux émissions. Une manière de distraire le téléspectateur et de multiplier les plages de pub. Il peut s'agir de reportages courts, tels « Du côté de chez vous », petite émission déco parrainée par Leroy Merlin sur TF1, ou « D'art d'art » sur France 2, mais aussi de fictions plus audacieuses, comme « Bref » sur Canal +."
http://www.leparisien.fr/loisirs-et-spectacles/pastille-17-0...

"Autre nouveauté annoncée pour la rentrée, un programme court (appelé dans le jargon « pastille »), fait pour et avec les enfants sur des thèmes d’actualité ou de société, intitulé 1 Jour, 1 Question."
https://tuauraslesyeuxcarres.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/rentre...

It's certainly not necessarily a film as such, but neither is it necessarily (or even usually) a "bump" or "teaser".

So they can be creative fictional pieces or topical, but they can also be commercial or advertising/marketing-related. The latter point is confirmed here:

"Une pastille publicitaire radio est une petite introduction faite à l’antenne par un animateur juste avant la diffusion du spot de l’annonceur.
La pastille radio permet de mieux intégrer la publicité dans la continuité du programme pour favoriser l’attention et permet également d’utiliser la voix de l’animateur comme « caution » pour l’annonceur."
https://www.definitions-marketing.com/definition/pastille-pu...

Well, "interstitial" really fits those specifications pretty well. Although the word carries strong connotations of advertising because of its use as an Internet term, where it refers to those ads that you get while your page is loading, in the audiovisual/TV context this is by no means necessarily so, no more so than "pastille".

"interstitial: A short show (up to 5 minutes) that is broadcast in-between full length shows."
https://motionworks.net/broadcast-terminology/

"In television programming, an interstitial program (or wraparound program or wraparound segment) refers to a short program that is often shown between movies or other events, e.g. cast interviews after movies on premium channels. The term can also refer to a narrative bridge between segments within a program, such as the live action introductions to the animated segments in the Disney films Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, or the Simpson family's interludes during their annual Treehouse of Horror episodes."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstitial_program

A good example, much cited on the web, of how an interstitial can be a very brief item within a programme is the fact that The Simpsons started life as an interstitial in the Tracy Ullman Show, though admittedly bookending the commercial breaks:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Simpsons_shorts

"As show producer James L. Brooks recently told The Hollywood Reporter, he wanted "Ullman" to feature short animated interstitials, and had liked Matt Groening's "Life in Hell" comics so well he invited the cartoonist to submit some ideas."
https://www.today.com/popculture/simpsons-made-their-tv-debu...

An example from the BBC:

"BBC Worldwide Channels introduces a new series of interstitials starring Polish children on the CBeebies channel this July.
Entitled My Favourite Things, each of the six 45" to 60" spots was filmed in Warsaw on 10 June and features Polish preschoolers talking about the things they enjoy most – from 'My Favourite Toy' to 'My Favourite Story'. The bright and colourful spots will be packaged with distinctive CBeebies branding."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/bbcworldwide/worldwidestori...

Perhaps most telling of all is that "animated interstitial" is very much a standard term in the animation industry. The following is well worth reading:

" Short Stops: Animated Interstitials
Joe Strike talks to several animation production companies about the growing need for interstitial programming around the globe.
Once upon a time -- that time being Saturday morning 34 years ago on ABC-TV -- there was Multiplication Rock. The three-minute long cartoon math lessons set to music proved so popular, they led to similar series covering grammar, science, American history, money and computers under the umbrella title of Schoolhouse Rock. [...]
For many kids in the U.S., Schoolhouse Rock was their introduction to interstitials -- short form segments serving as a bridge between full-length programming. The overall quality of TV cartoons has risen dramatically since the 1970s -- and so has the demand for interstitials. Now some of those same kids are creating or commissioning the next generation of these short-form bursts of animation."
It goes on to refer to Rintindumb, a Lucky Luke spinoff from the French studio Xilam; I'm convinced these would be called pastilles in French.
https://www.awn.com/animationworld/short-stops-animated-inte...
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:08
Grading comment
rating this as good-to-know - the client went for "videoclips"
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 -1Spot of animation
Mohamed Hosni
4animated short-short
Eliza Hall
4animated interstitials
Charles Davis
3 -1featurette
Trevino Translations
5 -3teaser
SafeTex


Discussion entries: 26





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -3
pastille d\'animation
teaser


Explanation:
Hello

Featurette looks good too but this is the word that I know and which can be confirmed on the Internet

SafeTex
France
Local time: 09:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: I think this would de inadvisable, as too restrictive: it describes only one particular purpose for which these 'pastilles' might be used.
1 hr

disagree  Eliza Hall: I'm with Tony M. A teaser creates curiosity for a longer film that the teaser comes from or is related to. A pastille or short-short can be a work in itself; there doesn't need to be a related, longer film.
3 hrs

disagree  GILOU: not the meaning here
17 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pastille d\'animation
animated short-short


Explanation:
A pastille, in TV/film jargon, is a very short film, typically 1 to 3 minutes long. Probably derived from the "petit morceau" meaning of pastille. This article says pastilles are under 2 minutes, but I've seen videos online that were called "pastilles" and were 3 mins long: http://www.leparisien.fr/loisirs-et-spectacles/pastille-17-0...

The English term isn't featurette because that's 24-40 minutes long: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Featurette

It's also not just "short," because that term includes anything under an hour (but typically 30-45 minutes): http://www.filmsite.org/filmterms17.html

Films this short are often called "short-shorts" (side note: that term is also used for very short stories, typically under 500 words): https://www.filmsshort.com/short-short-films/#.W6UZXFJJnUI

I prefer a hyphen for clarity (to show that repeating the word twice isn't a typo), but it's not necessary.

Eliza Hall
United States
Local time: 03:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I'd use this in a less formal context. Also WITHOUT the hyphen - you don't have to do everything spellcheck tells you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
1 hr

agree  philgoddard: I say no hyphen, though. Short-short looks wrong to me.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks. Yes, the hyphen is purely stylistic and optional.

disagree  GILOU: short-short, c'est plutôt un résumé
14 hrs
  -> No, it's not. In English a short-short is either (1) (literary) a very short story, typically <500 words; or (2) (film) a very short film that is complete in itself but is neither an advertisement nor a music video.

disagree  Mohamed Hosni: No, c'est pas du tout ça.
20 hrs
  -> Mohamed, would you MIND not commenting on language pairs that you don't work in? Imagine if I kept commenting on your Kudoz answers to Arabic>French questions. It would just make me look silly, wouldn't it.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
pastille d\'animation
featurette


Explanation:
See .pdf at link, page 88. Hope this helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2018-09-21 08:13:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2alpha/alpha-fra.html?la...

Found an additional reference...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2018-09-21 17:20:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://www.powerthesaurus.org/featurette/synonyms

Found another reference that might help...or not. ")


    Reference: http://madparis.fr/IMG/pdf/vocabulaire_audiovisuel_2010.pdf
Trevino Translations
France
Local time: 09:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Eliza Hall: A featurette is too long (24-40 minutes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Featurette). A pastille (pastille télé, pastille d'animation...) is typically 1-3 minutes long: http://www.leparisien.fr/loisirs-et-spectacles/pastille-17-0...
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pastille d\'animation
animated interstitials


Explanation:
After lengthy consideration, I think this is the best option. None of the others proposed here fully convinces me, but I think this one ticks the boxes, as they say.

What do we know about "pastilles"? They are short, no more than a very few minutes, they are basically TV-related (actually radio too), and they are a programming phenomenon: they are interspersed between longer programmes, and sometimes occur as interludes in the course of a longer programme.

Let's recall the definitions already cited:

"En jargon télévisuel, une pastille est un programme court, très court (deux minutes ou moins), souvent intercalé entre deux émissions. Une manière de distraire le téléspectateur et de multiplier les plages de pub. Il peut s'agir de reportages courts, tels « Du côté de chez vous », petite émission déco parrainée par Leroy Merlin sur TF1, ou « D'art d'art » sur France 2, mais aussi de fictions plus audacieuses, comme « Bref » sur Canal +."
http://www.leparisien.fr/loisirs-et-spectacles/pastille-17-0...

"Autre nouveauté annoncée pour la rentrée, un programme court (appelé dans le jargon « pastille »), fait pour et avec les enfants sur des thèmes d’actualité ou de société, intitulé 1 Jour, 1 Question."
https://tuauraslesyeuxcarres.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/rentre...

It's certainly not necessarily a film as such, but neither is it necessarily (or even usually) a "bump" or "teaser".

So they can be creative fictional pieces or topical, but they can also be commercial or advertising/marketing-related. The latter point is confirmed here:

"Une pastille publicitaire radio est une petite introduction faite à l’antenne par un animateur juste avant la diffusion du spot de l’annonceur.
La pastille radio permet de mieux intégrer la publicité dans la continuité du programme pour favoriser l’attention et permet également d’utiliser la voix de l’animateur comme « caution » pour l’annonceur."
https://www.definitions-marketing.com/definition/pastille-pu...

Well, "interstitial" really fits those specifications pretty well. Although the word carries strong connotations of advertising because of its use as an Internet term, where it refers to those ads that you get while your page is loading, in the audiovisual/TV context this is by no means necessarily so, no more so than "pastille".

"interstitial: A short show (up to 5 minutes) that is broadcast in-between full length shows."
https://motionworks.net/broadcast-terminology/

"In television programming, an interstitial program (or wraparound program or wraparound segment) refers to a short program that is often shown between movies or other events, e.g. cast interviews after movies on premium channels. The term can also refer to a narrative bridge between segments within a program, such as the live action introductions to the animated segments in the Disney films Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, or the Simpson family's interludes during their annual Treehouse of Horror episodes."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstitial_program

A good example, much cited on the web, of how an interstitial can be a very brief item within a programme is the fact that The Simpsons started life as an interstitial in the Tracy Ullman Show, though admittedly bookending the commercial breaks:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Simpsons_shorts

"As show producer James L. Brooks recently told The Hollywood Reporter, he wanted "Ullman" to feature short animated interstitials, and had liked Matt Groening's "Life in Hell" comics so well he invited the cartoonist to submit some ideas."
https://www.today.com/popculture/simpsons-made-their-tv-debu...

An example from the BBC:

"BBC Worldwide Channels introduces a new series of interstitials starring Polish children on the CBeebies channel this July.
Entitled My Favourite Things, each of the six 45" to 60" spots was filmed in Warsaw on 10 June and features Polish preschoolers talking about the things they enjoy most – from 'My Favourite Toy' to 'My Favourite Story'. The bright and colourful spots will be packaged with distinctive CBeebies branding."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/bbcworldwide/worldwidestori...

Perhaps most telling of all is that "animated interstitial" is very much a standard term in the animation industry. The following is well worth reading:

" Short Stops: Animated Interstitials
Joe Strike talks to several animation production companies about the growing need for interstitial programming around the globe.
Once upon a time -- that time being Saturday morning 34 years ago on ABC-TV -- there was Multiplication Rock. The three-minute long cartoon math lessons set to music proved so popular, they led to similar series covering grammar, science, American history, money and computers under the umbrella title of Schoolhouse Rock. [...]
For many kids in the U.S., Schoolhouse Rock was their introduction to interstitials -- short form segments serving as a bridge between full-length programming. The overall quality of TV cartoons has risen dramatically since the 1970s -- and so has the demand for interstitials. Now some of those same kids are creating or commissioning the next generation of these short-form bursts of animation."
It goes on to refer to Rintindumb, a Lucky Luke spinoff from the French studio Xilam; I'm convinced these would be called pastilles in French.
https://www.awn.com/animationworld/short-stops-animated-inte...

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
rating this as good-to-know - the client went for "videoclips"

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
1 hr
  -> Many thanks, Tony :-)

disagree  Mohamed Hosni: Incorrect use of the term.
3 hrs
  -> Which term, and why incorrect?
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Spot of animation


Explanation:
Suggestion

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 4 hrs (2018-09-22 12:27:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

C'est le repère d'amination

Mohamed Hosni
Morocco
Local time: 08:08
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Not correct in EN, 'a spot of...' used like this would translate 'un soupçon de...'
57 mins
  -> Incorrect use of the term.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search