Noue en zinc à agrafures

English translation: welted / flat locked / lock seamed zinc valley

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Noue en zinc à agrafures
English translation:welted / flat locked / lock seamed zinc valley

13:37 Apr 13, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / roofing
French term or phrase: Noue en zinc à agrafures
Hi, this is a roofing bill on a Paris building. I take it it's a "zinc valley" (?) but what is "agrafures"? The granddictionnaire says: "Jonction de deux feuilles de métal dont le pli de l'une s'accroche dans le pli de l'autre". or :"Façon de couverture en zinc à pente normale avec des agrafes."
Claire Waddington (X)
Local time: 05:41
welted / flat locked / lock seamed zinc valley
Explanation:
If your valley is longer than the longest available sheet of zinc, you'll obviously have to joint or overlap a number of sheets. Overlapping is easy to do and understand, after all, that's what they do with corrugated iron roofing sheets back home.

An agrafure [as shown in Dicobat] involves bending up a couple of centimetres, say, at the edge of two sheets, placing the upturns against each other, and folding 1 cm of the upturned part (two sheeets) over itself, then folding this multilayer section down flat (so one sheet is three layers thick at that point, the other two). The two sheets are pretty well crimped together, and placed on the roof so that the higher part of the assembly is "upstream", there is little chance of water getting in underneath the zinc, even with wind-driven rain.

Again, if you have done any dressmaking, you are bound to have done this sort of thing when stitching two pieces of material together.

Dicobat gives the English as (seam) welt, single lock welt.

Scott/Penguin Dict of Bldg gives :
welt, welted seam - A seam in supported sheetmetal roofing
[related] welted nosing - A junction in supported sheetmetal roofing in which a vertical sheet comes up under a horizontal sheet. They are folded together and dressed down the vertical surface.
seam, welted seam, welt, lock joint - A joint between two strips of supported sheet metal roofing made by turning the edge of each vertically upwards, bringing the two upturned parts together and folding them over each other, either once (single lock) or twice (double lock). Sloping seams down a roof (long joints) may be left as standing seams, but cross-joints are usually dressed down flat.

Agrafe (or patte d'agrafe or bande d'agrafe) and agrafure are not the same thing. Your agrafure is the seam over which water will flow (in this instance). Agrafes are the lugs, tabs, etc. soldered to the edges of the valley sheet (in this instance) and screwed or nailed to the strcuture to hold the valley in place.
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Bourth (X)
Local time: 05:41
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4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4welted / flat locked / lock seamed zinc valley
Bourth (X)


  

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Noue en zinc à agrafures
welted / flat locked / lock seamed zinc valley


Explanation:
If your valley is longer than the longest available sheet of zinc, you'll obviously have to joint or overlap a number of sheets. Overlapping is easy to do and understand, after all, that's what they do with corrugated iron roofing sheets back home.

An agrafure [as shown in Dicobat] involves bending up a couple of centimetres, say, at the edge of two sheets, placing the upturns against each other, and folding 1 cm of the upturned part (two sheeets) over itself, then folding this multilayer section down flat (so one sheet is three layers thick at that point, the other two). The two sheets are pretty well crimped together, and placed on the roof so that the higher part of the assembly is "upstream", there is little chance of water getting in underneath the zinc, even with wind-driven rain.

Again, if you have done any dressmaking, you are bound to have done this sort of thing when stitching two pieces of material together.

Dicobat gives the English as (seam) welt, single lock welt.

Scott/Penguin Dict of Bldg gives :
welt, welted seam - A seam in supported sheetmetal roofing
[related] welted nosing - A junction in supported sheetmetal roofing in which a vertical sheet comes up under a horizontal sheet. They are folded together and dressed down the vertical surface.
seam, welted seam, welt, lock joint - A joint between two strips of supported sheet metal roofing made by turning the edge of each vertically upwards, bringing the two upturned parts together and folding them over each other, either once (single lock) or twice (double lock). Sloping seams down a roof (long joints) may be left as standing seams, but cross-joints are usually dressed down flat.

Agrafe (or patte d'agrafe or bande d'agrafe) and agrafure are not the same thing. Your agrafure is the seam over which water will flow (in this instance). Agrafes are the lugs, tabs, etc. soldered to the edges of the valley sheet (in this instance) and screwed or nailed to the strcuture to hold the valley in place.


Bourth (X)
Local time: 05:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4135
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