entailles à chartains sur plat

04:13 Dec 5, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering /
French term or phrase: entailles à chartains sur plat
I'm translating some 1950s French architectural correspondence relating to prefabricated wooden houses and the specifications are rather technical, so I'd really appreciate some guidance!

This sentence is about the external walls: "Ces madriers superposés sont assemblés à leurs extrémités par des entailles à enfourchement sur champs et des entailles à chartrains sur plat."

Does anyone know the English term for "entailles à chartrains sur plat"? The document is a bit blurry so the word might be "chantrains".

Any advice much appreciated.
Sarah Walls
Australia
Local time: 14:13


Summary of answers provided
1 +1grooved and chamfered on the face
Maurice Thibaux


  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
grooved and chamfered on the face


Explanation:
There are several (5) methods to assemble planks (madriers) for wall cladding. One is by halving joints or half-lapped (entailles), another is by groove and chamfer on the face (sur plat), which I am guessing is what is supposed to be entailles et chartrain (a term which does not exist anywhere) sur plat. Maybe it should be "chanfrein" (chamfer), because my professional manual of woodworking has something fitting the description under: Double grooved and chamfer boards and the picture shows this joint on the face of the board.

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Note added at 5 hrs (2018-12-05 09:51:23 GMT)
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Could not find it anywhere (net and 5 technical, building and architecture dictionaries). Chartrain could be a method used by Canadians because there are lots of Chartrain (people originating from Chartres) in Canada... The method may be similar to shiplap (link provided in answer). Good luck.

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Note added at 3 days 19 hrs (2018-12-08 23:38:43 GMT)
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It was 'chanfrein' but my answers is still incorrect. The context was about joining the 'extremités / ends of the boards, not the champ / edge. The English terms should be bridle joint or notice and tendon for the type à enfourchement, and halving or half-lapped for entaille à chanfrein.


    https://www.timberfocus.com/product/siberian-larch-cladding-secret-fix-profile-tongue-and-groove-shiplap-profile-ex25x150mm-fsc-certified-21
Maurice Thibaux
Local time: 11:13
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 20
Notes to answerer
Asker: The word could well be "chanfreins" not "chartrains" -- the text is a scan of a blurry photocopy and at this point there is legal sentence stamped diagonally across the page, so I wasn't 100% sure about that word. "Chanfreins" would fit.

Asker: In the end, I owe thanks to Maurice Thibaux, BD Finch and Louise Normandin -- your contributions were all most helpful. In the end I went with "lapped and chamfered on the face". Thank you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: Your interpretation of this as "chanfrein" fits with the ST use of "champs" for "chants". Might it be "lapped and chamfered", not grooved?
2 hrs
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