charges

English translation: fillers / aggregates

17:41 Oct 2, 2020
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering
French term or phrase: charges
I'm translating a patent titled "Drinking water pipe or reservoir element with cementitious inner lining" (link to full patent below) and have run into an issue with the term "charges". Normally in this context, I believe it should be translated as "filler", per several previous ProZ entries on this term. However, in this particular patent, the English word "filler" is also used in the same sentence, which leaves me unable to translate "charges" this way and struggling to find an appropriate alternative translation.

Link to full patent:
https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2019215121A1/en?oq=WO 20...

Excerpt from patent (including two instances of "charges" and one instance of "filler"):
- la proportion massique du ciment CEM III/B ou du ciment Portland CEM I SR dans ledit mélange de la deuxième composition est comprise entre 60% et 90%, de préférence entre 70% et 80% ;
- le mortier comprend en outre des charges, dans un ratio massique (S/L) par rapport au liant compris entre 0,5 et 5, de préférence entre 1 et 4, et de manière encore plus préférée entre 1,5 et 3 ;
- les charges sont du filler, du sable et/ou du gravier, de préférence de nature siliceuse ou calcaire, au moins 95% en masse des charges ayant un diamètre inférieur ou égal à 8 mm,

For further context:
Avantageusement, les charges du mortier sont du sable, du gravier, ou leurs mélanges.

Par « filler » (de l’anglais to fill, qui signifie remplir), on entend par exemple des fines, ou des fines d’addition, c’est-à-dire un granulat fin.

Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions!
Jessica Crockett
United States
Local time: 12:41
English translation:fillers / aggregates
Explanation:
'Charges' should be called fillers or aggregates and 'Filler' should be called fines

According to this French source,

"DÉSIGNATION DES GRANULATS

Les granulats sont désignés suivant leur classe granulaire, en termes de dimension inférieure (d) et supérieure (D) de tamis, exprimée par d/D.

Filler La plupart des grains est < 63 µm
Sable 0/D d = 0 D ≤ 4mm
Gravillon d/D d ≥ 2mm 4 ≤ D ≤ 63mm
Grave 0/D d = 0 4 ≤ D ≤ 45mm

So, 'filler' is classed as an aggregate with grains < 63 µm"

This link to "Classification and Particle Properties of Fine Aggregates (< 63μm)
– Applied as concrete aggregate" refers to these fine aggregates as 'fines'

https://www.sintefbok.no/book/download/1013/iorganisasjonkun...

According to American standards, the size may be less than 75 microns

https://www.sintefbok.no/book/download/1013/iorganisasjonkun...

"The content of fines (particles smaller than 0.075 mm [No. 200] mesh) in aggregates used for the production of concrete is generally limited by most standards worldwide."


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2020-10-03 08:49:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From Civil Engineering Portal, "Gravel, stone and sand are used as filler materials which reduce the usage of cement in concrete and also cheaper." ( www.engineeringcivil.com/filler-materials-used-in-concrete.... ) Likewise, see https://www.toutsurlebeton.fr/le-ba-ba-du-beton/quels-sont-l... which lists aggregates as filler, sand and gravel. So, both aggregates and filler covers all the 'charges' terms. Also, according to http://matse1.matse.illinois.edu/concrete/prin.html "Concrete is a composite material which is made up of a filler and a binder. The binder (cement paste) "glues" the filler together to form a synthetic conglomerate. The constituents used for the binder are cement and water, while the filler can be fine or coarse aggregate...Aggregates are chemically inert, solid bodies held together by the cement. Aggregates come in various shapes, sizes, and materials ranging from fine particles of sand to large, coarse rocks."
Selected response from:

Althea Draper
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:41
Grading comment
Thanks for your help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3fillers / aggregates
Althea Draper
5loads
Ben Gaia
3mix
SafeTex


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
loads


Explanation:
the loads consist of filler, etc

Ben Gaia
New Zealand
Local time: 07:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I'm far from convinced this is the technical term we use in EN
45 mins

neutral  SafeTex: Hello Ben. Please see my point in the discussion plus other remarks. I changed this to "neutral" as I now have a suggestion up myself but I really don't think it's right
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
mix


Explanation:
Hello

Following on from Tony's idea that we need one word for "fillers and aggregates" (which is also Althea's answer) how about "mix".

Where the French says


Avantageusement, les charges du mortier sont du sable, du gravier, ou leurs mélanges.

"mélanages" would be translated as "mixture"



    https://www.instructables.com/How-to-Mix-Concrete-or-Cement/
SafeTex
France
Local time: 19:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
fillers / aggregates


Explanation:
'Charges' should be called fillers or aggregates and 'Filler' should be called fines

According to this French source,

"DÉSIGNATION DES GRANULATS

Les granulats sont désignés suivant leur classe granulaire, en termes de dimension inférieure (d) et supérieure (D) de tamis, exprimée par d/D.

Filler La plupart des grains est < 63 µm
Sable 0/D d = 0 D ≤ 4mm
Gravillon d/D d ≥ 2mm 4 ≤ D ≤ 63mm
Grave 0/D d = 0 4 ≤ D ≤ 45mm

So, 'filler' is classed as an aggregate with grains < 63 µm"

This link to "Classification and Particle Properties of Fine Aggregates (< 63μm)
– Applied as concrete aggregate" refers to these fine aggregates as 'fines'

https://www.sintefbok.no/book/download/1013/iorganisasjonkun...

According to American standards, the size may be less than 75 microns

https://www.sintefbok.no/book/download/1013/iorganisasjonkun...

"The content of fines (particles smaller than 0.075 mm [No. 200] mesh) in aggregates used for the production of concrete is generally limited by most standards worldwide."


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2020-10-03 08:49:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From Civil Engineering Portal, "Gravel, stone and sand are used as filler materials which reduce the usage of cement in concrete and also cheaper." ( www.engineeringcivil.com/filler-materials-used-in-concrete.... ) Likewise, see https://www.toutsurlebeton.fr/le-ba-ba-du-beton/quels-sont-l... which lists aggregates as filler, sand and gravel. So, both aggregates and filler covers all the 'charges' terms. Also, according to http://matse1.matse.illinois.edu/concrete/prin.html "Concrete is a composite material which is made up of a filler and a binder. The binder (cement paste) "glues" the filler together to form a synthetic conglomerate. The constituents used for the binder are cement and water, while the filler can be fine or coarse aggregate...Aggregates are chemically inert, solid bodies held together by the cement. Aggregates come in various shapes, sizes, and materials ranging from fine particles of sand to large, coarse rocks."

Example sentence(s):
  • The content of fines (particles smaller than 0.075 mm [No. 200] mesh) in aggregates used for the production of concrete is generally limited by most standards worldwide.
  • Particle size analysis showed a high fines content of crushed sand (6% of grains smaller than 63 microns)

    https://www.concrete.org/publications/internationalconcreteabstractsportal/m/details/id/18226
    https://www.toutsurlebeton.fr/le-ba-ba-du-beton/quels-sont-les-constituants-du-beton/
Althea Draper
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thanks for your help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libby Cohen: Sounds right.
25 mins
  -> Thanks Libby

agree  MatthewLaSon: You've convinced me. Have a great weekend.
1 day 6 mins
  -> Thanks Matthew, you too.

agree  Bokani Hart
3 days 9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search