ourlet en rive

English translation: window frame trim

14:59 Apr 12, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / roofing
French term or phrase: ourlet en rive
It's a bill for roofing, am on the subject of dormers:
Lucarnes

Dessus en zinc 65/100
Bande d’agrafe 80/100. ourlet en rive
Remontée sur brisis
Tasseaux 0.40. couvre-joints et talons
Claire Waddington (X)
Local time: 10:03
English translation:window frame trim
Explanation:
the wood trim...usually...that goes over the frame..to make it pretty

... New-construction windows are secured to the frame of the house by nailing ... is related to ***removal and repair of existing window trim*** and siding. ...
doityourself.com/windows/retrofit.htm - 32k - Cached - Similar pages
Selected response from:

Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
Grading comment
Thank you very much. I'll put that. What does the "en rive" part refer to?
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1seam, roll
Bourth (X)
5window frame trim
Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
window frame trim


Explanation:
the wood trim...usually...that goes over the frame..to make it pretty

... New-construction windows are secured to the frame of the house by nailing ... is related to ***removal and repair of existing window trim*** and siding. ...
doityourself.com/windows/retrofit.htm - 32k - Cached - Similar pages

Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 57
Grading comment
Thank you very much. I'll put that. What does the "en rive" part refer to?
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
seam, roll


Explanation:
In sheetmetal roofing, an "ourlet" is usually a "seam" (it involves turning one or more sheets of metal over at least once - imagine the hem on the legs of your jeans, where the denim is folded up once, then over again to form a triple thickness concealing the (frayed) edge of the fabric. Same thing happens in roofing for similar reasons (to get a sharp, cutting edge out of the way), and others. It can also be (called) a "roll".

I imagine your roofing clip (bande d'agrafe) looks more pleasing if the bottom end is turned up (flat) or rolled over, so you can't see the bare metal edge. It might also make the thing a more effective drip, i.e. make water drip off it rather than running along the edge and getting into mischief somewhere where it shouldn't be.

<<ourlet - 2/ couvert. - façon de bordure de feuille de plomb ou de zinc, roulée en baguette arrondie sur toute sa longueur (ne pas confondre avec une pince [but people do, hence the warning - a "pince" is a flat fold/seam/turnover]>>
[Dicobat]

The picture shows two types of "ourlet", with the edge of the sheet forming either a 360° circle or slightly more (spiral).

The English given is "(edge) sheet bead, hem", though I would be tempted to dispute both.

Applied to the joins between sheets of roofing metal, we speak in English of seams (standing seams, where the two sheets are folded over together and left standing at right angles to the main part of the sheet - look at almost any Paris roof and you will see standing seams) or rolls, where the edges of two sheets are rolled together to joint them and prevent water getting through. I cannot substantiate it, but I see no reason why either term should not apply to the end of a fixing strip.

On the "rive" (= fascia, the vertical part of sheetmetal roofing at the edge of the roof), because that is precisely where you want to make the water drip off, I imagine.

Bourth (X)
Local time: 10:03
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4135

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, of course, it's the rolled edge, like on my zinc ridging strip! Also stiffens it, don't you think? Surely 'ourlet en rive' simply means '(with a) rolled edge'?
13 mins
  -> Possibly, Context needed. Frequency of "rive" as "fascia" of a roof makes me think it is this.
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