tranche d'échine

English translation: pork collar steak

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tranche d'échine
English translation:pork collar steak
Entered by: Sheila Wilson

23:39 May 15, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / cut of pork
French term or phrase: tranche d'échine
This is a cut of pork in a cookbook of barbecue recipes.

I know we have had "côte d'échine" before, but is "tranche" a significant difference? It is in an ingredients list for a dish "échine & moutarde à l’ancienne" and the specifications are "6 tranches d’échine" to serve 6, the cut is cooked for 20 mins, which is quite a long time for this author (suggesting a tougher cut? Or a fattier cut?).

My leading contenders are "forequarter chop" and "pork scotch fillet steak", and I suspect "échine" could encompass both. Australian/UK terms are the preferred starting point, though neutral/descriptive suggestions are welcome (and unlikely, I know).

I feel like every time I have to deal with "échine" I get a few new grey hairs - it's a very French-specific cut isn't it?
Melissa McMahon
Australia
Local time: 22:01
pork shoulder slice
Explanation:
I know what you mean about cuts of pork - we need to get our butchers together in mid-Channel and get some "entente cordiale" going.

However, this is what I would use both personally and professionally. Here's what you get when looking for pictures of the two:

http://www.google.fr/search?um=1&hl=fr&client=firefox-a&rls=...

http://www.google.fr/search?um=1&hl=fr&client=firefox-a&hs=K...

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Note added at 7 hrs (2011-05-16 07:31:49 GMT)
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You queried whether there was a higher fat content, Melissa. Yes, this is a cut from the shoulder where the meat is marbled with fat. When they are sold in servings with the bone in, they are shoulder chops as opposed to the leaner loin chops.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2011-05-16 07:44:09 GMT)
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Here's a bilingual site that refers to the English cut as "collar" and that seems to be widespread. Always wondered what collar was!

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Note added at 8 hrs (2011-05-16 07:44:21 GMT)
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http://www.frenchporkcuts.com/index.php/rubrique/loin/collar...

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Note added at 8 hrs (2011-05-16 07:58:26 GMT)
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To wrap that up in a neater bundle, I would advise:

pork + shoulder/collar + slice/steak

Voilà!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2011-05-16 15:47:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think there is a difference between 'tranche' and 'côte', although there seems to be overlap and/or confusion. 'Côtes' in my local supermarkets almost always have some bone at the exterior edge, whereas 'tranches' either have a small central bone or no bone.
Selected response from:

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 11:01
Grading comment
Thanks Sheila, I went for "pork collar steak" in the end, it seemed the most descriptive of the general area of the échine and I think you are right about the difference between a côte and a tranche. Thanks again.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4pork shoulder slice
Sheila Wilson
3 +2back ribs
Jean Lachaud
1pork loin slice
andres-larsen
Summary of reference entries provided
Pork cuts
Tony M

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
back ribs


Explanation:
Sounds like "back ribs", but that would be a US term, I suppose.

Jean Lachaud
United States
Local time: 06:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: French
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks JL, I think this is more of a US term.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SafeTex: http://www.linternaute.com/dictionnaire/fr/definition/echine...
3 hrs

agree  Alistair Ian Spearing Ortiz
5 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
pork loin slice


Explanation:
pork loin slice

sources:

Délicieux Préparez Pour Des Tranches D'échine De Rôti De Porc De ... - 20 mars 2011 ... Délicieux préparez pour des ***tranches d'échine de rôti de porc de romarin d'ail ... Delicious ready for dinner garlic rosemary roast pork loin slices***, ... Delicious sliced garlic thyme roast pork loin is ready for dinner ...
fr.123rf.com/photo_827814_d-licieux-pr-parez-pour-des-tranches-d-chine- de-r-ti-de-porc-de-romarin-d-ail-de-d-ner-des-ingr-dien.html -

Recette Baeckeoffe, Recette Choucroute Alsacienne, potée ... - 500g de gîte de bœuf; 500g ***d'échine de porc désossée; 1 queue et 1 pied de ... Dresser la choucroute sur un plat chaud, garnir de tranches de carré de porc, ... Pile the sauerkraut onto a hot dish and garnish with slices of pork loin***, ...
www.alsace-depot.fr/.../recette_baeckeoffe_choucroute.html -

Gastronomy - Groupe Breizh Poellrezh - ***Echine - meaning shoulder, encompasses the blade bone and spare ribs. ... Basically, rack of pork. • Filet - in France, is from the hind loin area of the pig. ... Tranche - meaning 'slice', implies a steak of any meat other than beef***. ...
www.breizh-poellrezh.eu/Gastronomy.html -

andres-larsen
Venezuela
Local time: 07:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
pork shoulder slice


Explanation:
I know what you mean about cuts of pork - we need to get our butchers together in mid-Channel and get some "entente cordiale" going.

However, this is what I would use both personally and professionally. Here's what you get when looking for pictures of the two:

http://www.google.fr/search?um=1&hl=fr&client=firefox-a&rls=...

http://www.google.fr/search?um=1&hl=fr&client=firefox-a&hs=K...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2011-05-16 07:31:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You queried whether there was a higher fat content, Melissa. Yes, this is a cut from the shoulder where the meat is marbled with fat. When they are sold in servings with the bone in, they are shoulder chops as opposed to the leaner loin chops.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2011-05-16 07:44:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's a bilingual site that refers to the English cut as "collar" and that seems to be widespread. Always wondered what collar was!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2011-05-16 07:44:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.frenchporkcuts.com/index.php/rubrique/loin/collar...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2011-05-16 07:58:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To wrap that up in a neater bundle, I would advise:

pork + shoulder/collar + slice/steak

Voilà!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2011-05-16 15:47:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think there is a difference between 'tranche' and 'côte', although there seems to be overlap and/or confusion. 'Côtes' in my local supermarkets almost always have some bone at the exterior edge, whereas 'tranches' either have a small central bone or no bone.

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 11:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
Thanks Sheila, I went for "pork collar steak" in the end, it seemed the most descriptive of the general area of the échine and I think you are right about the difference between a côte and a tranche. Thanks again.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I think we also use 'cutlet' don't we?
15 mins
  -> Thanks, Tony. Frankly, I'm no exactly sure what 'cutlet' means but I suspect you're right. Google images of them show 'blobs' or all sorts

agree  Rachel Fell: pork shoulder steak/slice http://www.lovepork.co.uk/recipes/pork-shoulder-steaks-with-... (I usu. think of cutlets as having a rib bone)
59 mins
  -> Thanks, Rachel. Cutlet suggests rib bone for me, too - but where does that leave nut cutlets?

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: pork collar steak gets more ghits! BTW I alway equate cutlets with chops=cotelettes//here chops/cutlets= synonyms. However, googling shows chops as bigger with bone in, cutlets off bone and sometimes pounded into other shapes e.g croquettes/balls
5 hrs
  -> Thanks.But if you Google cutlet images, they seem to be all shapes and sizes

agree  Yolanda Broad: From descriptions others have provided, this sounds like what we call pork shoulder chops in the US.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks. Well, it's nice to know the 2 variants do have points in common :-) The only reason I haven't proposed 'chop' is that the source doesn't use 'côte'
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Reference comments


7 hrs
Reference: Pork cuts

Reference information:
If you do a Google search on porc + découpe, you get loads of results, including helpful illustrations.
I won't post specific ones here, as there are so many, you really need to dip into the search results, but I feel sure you'll find many of the documents enlightening!

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Note added at 8 heures (2011-05-16 07:49:06 GMT)
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I should add that I first tried a Gioole image search, which returns the most helpful diagrams you could wish for.

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Note added at 8 heures (2011-05-16 07:49:44 GMT)
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MORE COFFEE!!

Google, of course!

Tony M
France
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 406
Note to reference poster
Asker: Gioole sounds like an Italian knock-off... Thanks for the tip!

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