Toasts grillés

English translation: Garlic bread

18:55 Sep 23, 2013
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu à la carte
French term or phrase: Toasts grillés
http://cuisine.journaldesfemmes.com/recette/314530-toasts-gr...
Fabrice59
France
Local time: 22:49
English translation:Garlic bread
Explanation:
In the US, the recipe provided is simply for Garlic Bread. I would favor calling it what it is, rather than trying to find a solution for toasts grillés. Compare the ingredients in the original recipe with those found in the reference. A "toasty" refers to a sandwich, which is not what is being asked about.
Selected response from:

Ben Karl
United States
Local time: 13:49
Grading comment
Merci
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4Garlic bread
Ben Karl
4 +2hot grilled canapé
Tony M


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
toast grillé
hot grilled canapé


Explanation:
A 'toast' in FR means a little canapé-type thing, usually based around a piece of bread (not neceesarily 'toasted' bread!)

Hence a 'toast grillé' is the same thing, but specifically heated (think yummy garlic bread, for example) — in this case, grilled

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 406

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ben Karl: You mention garlic bread, which is exactly what this recipe is for (bread, garlic, parsley, olive oil, salt).
10 mins
  -> I'm not convinced Asker' recipe is THE actual source text.

agree  B D Finch: The Asker only asked for a translation of "toasts grillés", not "toasts grillés à l'ail". The specific type of (garlic?) bread needs to be described, as you have done. Also, for all we know, that web ref was only an example, not the Asker's source text.
18 mins
  -> Thanks, B! :-) That's very much what I suspect, given Asker's other questions.

neutral  emiledgar: Not in US; don't know about the UK, but this is "garlic bread" in US
18 mins
  -> Yes, but I think you are jumpping to conclusions: I don't think that recipe is the actual source text at all.

neutral  writeaway: http://cuisine.journaldesfemmes.com/recette/314530-toasts-gr... it's grilled slices of garlic bread it's as simple and easy as all the rest. toasted slices of garlic bread if you want to tart it up. pourquoi chercher midi à quatorze heures?
33 mins
  -> Thanks, W/A! Yes, of course as long as that recipe IS the actual source text, which I suspect may not be the case. Either way, this is a safe bet ;-)

agree  Victoria Britten: or toasted canapé, on the grounds that "pain grillé" = toasted bread
57 mins
  -> Thanks, Victoria! All depends on actual context...
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Garlic bread


Explanation:
In the US, the recipe provided is simply for Garlic Bread. I would favor calling it what it is, rather than trying to find a solution for toasts grillés. Compare the ingredients in the original recipe with those found in the reference. A "toasty" refers to a sandwich, which is not what is being asked about.



    Reference: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/garlic-bread-...
Ben Karl
United States
Local time: 13:49
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Merci

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  emiledgar: Absolutely: for the US, the recipe provided is as classic a recipe for Garlic Bread as is possible. The only even more classic recipe would substitue butter for oil.
13 mins

neutral  B D Finch: Only when it has "à l'ail" appended and not all garlic bread is prepared this way. Some versions do not involve "toasts grillés"
18 mins
  -> True, my suggestion is in response to the reference item provided. Food terms are so specific and so regional, that without more context fining the perfect term will be difficult.

neutral  Tony M: I don't think for a moment that the recipe cited is actually the source text
26 mins
  -> Tony, I believe the OP should provide better source context, in this case. In the context of the reference provided, I feel the most appropriate term is indeed garlic bread.

agree  writeaway: absolutely. nothing more and nothing less. Asker's reference couldn't be clearer. Same in all versions of English
31 mins

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: this is certainly what it is in the the ref supplied by Asker WITH "à l'ail"
3 hrs

agree  GILOU
13 hrs

agree  Verginia Ophof
22 hrs
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