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Ancien

English translation: Peer Mentor

22:34 Feb 28, 2020
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy / Arts & Métiers
French term or phrase: Ancien
Bonjour,

J'aimerais savoir s'il existe un terme spécifique en anglais pour désigner ce qu'on appelle un Ancien. Aux Arts & Métiers, il s'agit d'un étudiant plus âgé qui prend sous son aile un jeune étudiant pour l'accompagner dans diverses démarches au sein de l'école. Existe-t-il ce genre de concept dans les universités anglo-saxonnes ?

Merci d'avance
Florian PLATEL
France
Local time: 13:59
English translation:Peer Mentor
Explanation:
Depending on the context, buddy could sound too informal. A peer mentor is the more formal term. It does not exist at every University, but would be a familiar concept. http://www.bristol.ac.uk/students/study/peer-mentoring/
Selected response from:

Emma Page
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:59
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all for your suggestions
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6Peer Mentor
Emma Page
5Mentor/coach
Youssef Chabat
3 +1alumnus OR peer mentor
ph-b
3 +1Senior
Wolf Draeger
4Buddy
Yvonne Gallagher


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Peer Mentor


Explanation:
Depending on the context, buddy could sound too informal. A peer mentor is the more formal term. It does not exist at every University, but would be a familiar concept. http://www.bristol.ac.uk/students/study/peer-mentoring/


    Reference: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/students/study/peer-mentoring/
Emma Page
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all for your suggestions
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Emma :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Silvija Gavrilovic
3 hrs

agree  Nicole Acher
3 hrs

agree  Jay Gonzalez: I agree. "Student mentor" can also be an option if the concept of student-to-student or peer mentoring has already been established
6 hrs

agree  ph-b: on the basis of Florian's definition.
13 hrs

agree  K. Isaac
2 days 6 hrs

agree  Alice Quinn
2 days 9 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Buddy


Explanation:
https://www.dur.ac.uk/od/mentoring/typesofmentor/inductionme...

http://uofg.esnuk.org/esn-uofg-buddy-system

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2020-02-28 22:44:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://www.bath.ac.uk/campaigns/campus-buddies/

https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/business-school/study/international-s...

some universities run the programme for "freshers", some for foreign students, and others for specific groups of students

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 12:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 100
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Mentor/coach


Explanation:
If too much older and experienced veteran

Youssef Chabat
Morocco
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: impressive refs to back so much confidence
15 mins

neutral  erwan-l: refs would be appreciated
1 hr
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Senior


Explanation:
My first thought is to juxtapose "junior" and "senior" to refer to new and older students at a school or college/university, with the latter (supposedly) having the knowledge and experience to help the former settle in and find their feet (practical, social and perhaps even academic support).

Despite no solid refs, and the specific meaning of "senior" in the US context to refer to a fourth-year student notwithstanding, the term sounds intuitive to me and I think it would be readily understood by any English-speaker.

---

Off topic, I shudder every time I see "Anglo-Saxon" used to refer to anything other than the Germanic tribes that settled in Britain from C5. I know the term is widespread in French and (horror of all horrors!) is gaining ground in English too, but it should be avoided like the plague in careful writing. Use English-speaking, Anglophone or Anglosphere if that's what you mean or Anglo-American if you're being specific.

The Economist style guide puts it well:
"Anglo-Saxon is not a synonym for English-speaking. Neither the United States nor Australia is an Anglo-Saxon country; nor is Britain. Anglo-Saxon capitalism does not exist."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs (2020-02-29 11:21:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

See also https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/freshman-sophomore-s...


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senior_(education)
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Student
Wolf Draeger
South Africa
Local time: 13:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your answer and for the off topic lesson, I will no longer use this expression now :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ph-b: with senior (mentor?) on the basis of Florian's definition
1 hr

neutral  Emma Page: I think this really does depend on the context. I would strongly caution against using "senior" and "junior" to mean anything but fourth and third year undergraduates, respectively, in the US, to avoid inevitable confusion. Elsewhere, maybe.
1 hr

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: "senior" simply means that, nothing else and is less common in UK in this sort of context. Anyway, another word or words are needed to make it mean buddy or mentor? And 'anglo-saxonne' is commonly used in French
6 hrs
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
alumnus OR peer mentor


Explanation:

Does Ancien really mean étudiant plus âgé qui prend sous son aile un jeune étudiant pour l'accompagner dans diverses démarches au sein de l'école? That may be the case in context, which we don't have, but that is not what the term usually means.

And so the translation must reflect either the term asked or the definition given.

Ancien (esp. with a capital A as in the text of the question) stands for « Ancien élève », defined as “Qui n'a plus sa qualité antérieure (exprimé par le subst. qualifié). Ancien élève ” ( https://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/ancien), i.e. someone who is no longer a student in that school (and so, not just “étudiant plus âgé “).

The word "alumnus" comes to mind: “someone who has left a school, college, or university after finishing their studies there” (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/fr/dictionnaire/anglais/alu... or “ a person who has attended or has graduated from a particular school, college, or university “ (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/alumnus). See also Termium : http://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2alpha/alpha-fra.html?la...

Note too that the American friends of A&M call themselves the “(816 Active) Alumni Network” (https://americanfriendsam.org/#g-contenttab-4).

We don’t know the destination country, but all English-speaking universities that I know use "alumnus" in that sense.

However, do Anciens really do that: “accompagner dans diverses démarches au sein de l'école”? That’s for bodies like the students’ association/union, or whatever they call themselves. If Anciens can do some of it (but within the school? ), what they mostly do is a lot of networking.

For that reason, I think that “peer mentor” fits at least part of the definition that we are given (“prendre sous son aile”) and could be the right idea here.


ph-b
France
Local time: 13:59
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad
9 hrs
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