maintient en chauffe

English translation: Common grammatical mistake

21:19 Apr 22, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng / detection equipment
French term or phrase: maintient en chauffe
Still wading through my gamma spectrometry text - only 3 pages to go! I find this a bit odd, mainly because of the t at the end of "maintient", but it occurs several times, so not an obvious typing mistake - maybe a dyslexic author!

This appears in a section entitled "Inoperability":

3.3.1. Redémarrage du système de mesure du poste 3
3.3.1.1. Actions de maintenance au redémarrage
Mise sous tension du matériel de mesure.
Maintient en chauffe des électroniques pour obtenir les conditions optimum.
Contrôles périodiques pour vérification du bon fonctionnement du matériel de mesure.

Is it just a case of keeping the electronic equipment warm or is it something more complicated?

Many thanks as ever
Claire Cox
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:46
English translation:Common grammatical mistake
Explanation:
It's amazing (sic?)the number of supposedly intelligent, educated folk who cannot write their own language. I know the pronuciation of "(le) maintien" and "(il) maintient" is the same, but many people don't realize they are spelt differently.

Yes, basically it's just keeping the circuits warm, but there has to be a techy term for it, maybe just "hot" as in the "hot boot" you have to do on your PC every time the screen goes blue!

Unless it actually DOES mean having heating elements among the circuitry ...
Selected response from:

Bourth (X)
Local time: 17:46
Grading comment
Thanks Alex
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5ready / standby / idle / ...
Pierre Renault
4 +1Common grammatical mistake
Bourth (X)


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Common grammatical mistake


Explanation:
It's amazing (sic?)the number of supposedly intelligent, educated folk who cannot write their own language. I know the pronuciation of "(le) maintien" and "(il) maintient" is the same, but many people don't realize they are spelt differently.

Yes, basically it's just keeping the circuits warm, but there has to be a techy term for it, maybe just "hot" as in the "hot boot" you have to do on your PC every time the screen goes blue!

Unless it actually DOES mean having heating elements among the circuitry ...

Bourth (X)
Local time: 17:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 447
Grading comment
Thanks Alex

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: it means keeping them warmed up, so that operting conditions are stable; as far as I know, 'warmed up' is the term, ratehr than just 'warm' or 'hot' (though we do also talk about a 'hot spare' = a duplicate unit kept warmed up and ready to go)
43 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
ready / standby / idle / ...


Explanation:
Remember tube radios and TV's? It wasn't just a matter of warming up the tubes, it was also a matter of building up the charge in certain parts of the circuit. In the case of the TV, it takes quite a bit of voltage to get the electrons from the back of the picture tube to the front (so you can see it). That voltage (in the thousands of volts) need to be built up.

Radio crystals (the kind used by radio stations to set the broadcast frequency) have to be kept at a certain temperature. If the crystal is cold, the radio station will not transmit at the correct frequency. Warming up the crystal is a matter of minutes.

Laser printer drums have to warm up to operate (they bake the ink onto the paper), etc. ad nauseam. Warming up the drum takes a second or two.

That's the way the world works! You can't jump if your knees are not bent. Keep your knees bent, you are keeping them "en chauffe" to jump. When I used to work in photolabs, the densitometers had to be on for at least 24 hours to be considered reliable (the light amplification circuits were very very sensitive).

Fluorescent lights for enlargers have heaters built in to avoid the small delay that occurs when turning on a cold fluorescent light.

Same thing for the circuit (the software module, whatever). Keeping it warm, charged up, keeps it instantly ready to do what its gotta do.

Suggestions:
If the unit is constantly in this "en chauffe" mode when not being used (my densitometer example), then perhaps "standby"--for example, on a switch, "On" (working), "Standby" (some circuits are charged so you don't have to wait two minutes), "Off" (no power anywhere).

"Idle" (like a motor) when the circuit is (constantly) doing something while the circuit is in a ready state (like checking resetting a clock or counter)

HTH

P


Pierre Renault
Local time: 11:46
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  ketter: Just a comment...if the circuits need to be warm,"standby" doesn't convey that IMHO. I think of a computer monitor on standby. You move your mouse to turn the monitor back on, and it takes a few seconds because it was cold, basically off until activated.
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search