en bout d'electrodes/pince

English translation: See explanation below...

08:48 Apr 13, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Engineering (general) / welding
French term or phrase: en bout d'electrodes/pince
This comes from an information sheet for repair garages. It's about welding machines.

Pour couvrir la majorité des opérations de réparation collision, le poste de soudage dans lequel vous envisagez d'investir doit pouvoir fournir, au minimum, les performances suivantes:

* I rms (Intensité efficace) en bout d'électrodes : 11 000 A
* Effort en bout de pince : 350 daN

For the technical bit, my current translation reads:

* I rms (effective intensity) in electrode tips: 11 000 A
* Tip stress : 350 daN

But I'm not really sure about this! Can anyone help?
anna purna
France
Local time: 12:20
English translation:See explanation below...
Explanation:
Irms = effective current
en bout... at electrode tip
Effort de bout de pince...
is talking about the gripping force of the earthing clip --- it needs to make really good contact so as to allow all the current to pass!
I would say 'gripping force', though you might just want to check out some welding equipment sites via Google to check if there isn't a specialist term, as I am NOT a welding expert!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2005-04-13 09:04:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I is the standard abbreviation for current, coming originally from the French \'intensité\' [cf Ampère!]

In electrical contexts, it very rarely translates as \'intensity\' -- a \'faux ami\' if ever there was one!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 4 mins (2005-04-13 09:53:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I just tried a quick Google, and came up with loads of hits, well worth investigating! Here\'s one you might find useful:

http://www.tjsnow.com/supplies/miyachi/MM-356.htm

There seems to be a lot of talk about \'electrode force\', though in the sites I investigated, this is not clearly linked with anything like \'pince\'; but they DO talk also about \'squeeze time\', which may well be much more directly relevant. I think you probably need to do the reserach yourself in order to understand, so that you can better interpret in your overall context.

I think Lilian may well have it half right, it does look as if this is either the force with which a spot welder closes (clamps), or maybe the force with which the electrode is gripped (but these might be continuous-fed MIG-type welders too...) --- but in either case, I strongly suspect \'tongs\' is not the appropriate term here.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 5 mins (2005-04-13 09:53:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I do beg your pardon, I meant to type Liliana :-(

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 10 mins (2005-04-13 09:59:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just to clarify: on the basis of Liliana\'s helpful additional input, I now think that my original suggestion about the EARTH CLAMP force is probably wrong for this context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 17 mins (2005-04-13 12:05:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Liliana, for that extra information.

I fear we are all labouring here under a lack of context; all the tools you mention are of course entirely appropriate possibilities in a manual welding context; however, I suspect here we may be talking about some kind of machine (only Asker may be able to enlighten us!)

For one thing, just look how high that welding current is; and more importantly, if you are gripping your welding rod with anything as imprecise as tongs or pliers, I doubt there would be much point specifying a precise force.

I suspect (and of course it IS only that!) this is much more likely to be (for example...) the kind of spot-welding machine that clamps the 2 workpieces together then zaps them; in this kind of context, I can easily imagine that it would be important to specify this clamping force... Do you see the way I\'m thinking? Of course, I may be compeletly and utterly barking up the wrong tree... :-()
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:20
Grading comment
Thanks a million, Dusty, for all this. I think you're being very modest in saying that you are not a welding expert! You hit the nail on the head at the end, when you mentionned the bit about clamping and zapping. It all then made sense, so, for the record, "clamping force" was the translation I decided on.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4at the end of the electrodes/ at the end of the tongs
LILIANA HUTANU
3See explanation below...
Tony M


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
at the end of the electrodes/ at the end of the tongs


Explanation:
"pince" is the tongs keeping the electrode tight.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 8 mins (2005-04-13 11:57:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"pince\" may be \"pliers\" for a welding machine.
e.g. hawkbill pliers; soldering pliers; soldering tweezers
Please choose what seems to be more appropriate.

LILIANA HUTANU
Romania
Local time: 13:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Grading comment
Thanks for your help

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I'm not so sure, Liliana! That's quite a big force, but if this is arc welding, the earth clamp needs that much... But you COULD indeed be right.... // please see note added to my own answer...
37 mins
  -> Thanks for your comments. I have added more info. Please comment.
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks for your help

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
See explanation below...


Explanation:
Irms = effective current
en bout... at electrode tip
Effort de bout de pince...
is talking about the gripping force of the earthing clip --- it needs to make really good contact so as to allow all the current to pass!
I would say 'gripping force', though you might just want to check out some welding equipment sites via Google to check if there isn't a specialist term, as I am NOT a welding expert!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2005-04-13 09:04:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I is the standard abbreviation for current, coming originally from the French \'intensité\' [cf Ampère!]

In electrical contexts, it very rarely translates as \'intensity\' -- a \'faux ami\' if ever there was one!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 4 mins (2005-04-13 09:53:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I just tried a quick Google, and came up with loads of hits, well worth investigating! Here\'s one you might find useful:

http://www.tjsnow.com/supplies/miyachi/MM-356.htm

There seems to be a lot of talk about \'electrode force\', though in the sites I investigated, this is not clearly linked with anything like \'pince\'; but they DO talk also about \'squeeze time\', which may well be much more directly relevant. I think you probably need to do the reserach yourself in order to understand, so that you can better interpret in your overall context.

I think Lilian may well have it half right, it does look as if this is either the force with which a spot welder closes (clamps), or maybe the force with which the electrode is gripped (but these might be continuous-fed MIG-type welders too...) --- but in either case, I strongly suspect \'tongs\' is not the appropriate term here.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 5 mins (2005-04-13 09:53:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I do beg your pardon, I meant to type Liliana :-(

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 10 mins (2005-04-13 09:59:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just to clarify: on the basis of Liliana\'s helpful additional input, I now think that my original suggestion about the EARTH CLAMP force is probably wrong for this context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 17 mins (2005-04-13 12:05:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Liliana, for that extra information.

I fear we are all labouring here under a lack of context; all the tools you mention are of course entirely appropriate possibilities in a manual welding context; however, I suspect here we may be talking about some kind of machine (only Asker may be able to enlighten us!)

For one thing, just look how high that welding current is; and more importantly, if you are gripping your welding rod with anything as imprecise as tongs or pliers, I doubt there would be much point specifying a precise force.

I suspect (and of course it IS only that!) this is much more likely to be (for example...) the kind of spot-welding machine that clamps the 2 workpieces together then zaps them; in this kind of context, I can easily imagine that it would be important to specify this clamping force... Do you see the way I\'m thinking? Of course, I may be compeletly and utterly barking up the wrong tree... :-()

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 601
Grading comment
Thanks a million, Dusty, for all this. I think you're being very modest in saying that you are not a welding expert! You hit the nail on the head at the end, when you mentionned the bit about clamping and zapping. It all then made sense, so, for the record, "clamping force" was the translation I decided on.
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