les termes, les modalités et les conditions

English translation: the terms and conditions

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase: les termes, les modalités et les conditions
English translation:the terms and conditions
Entered by: Chris Hall

13:51 Oct 2, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Engineering: Industrial
French term or phrase: les termes, les modalités et les conditions
Should I translate this as terms and conditions of contract?
ainichi
United Kingdom
the terms and conditions
Explanation:
I honestly do not see any significant difference between the two here ("termes" and "modalités" that is).
Selected response from:

Chris Hall
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:05
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +5the terms and conditions
Chris Hall
4 +1throw in "modalities" for good luck
Bourth (X)


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
the terms and conditions


Explanation:
I honestly do not see any significant difference between the two here ("termes" and "modalités" that is).

Chris Hall
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:05
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jmleger: yes
9 mins
  -> Many thanks jmleger - much appreciated...

agree  Charles Hawtrey (X)
9 mins
  -> Many thanks Charles - much appreciated...

agree  swanda: "Terms and conditions" is used in all legal documents
42 mins
  -> I totally agree with you. Many thanks - much appreciated...

agree  Julie Barber: I never see "modalities" in contracts, just T&C's .....
59 mins
  -> Neither do I. Many thanks Julie - much appreciated...

agree  Dr Lofthouse
10 hrs
  -> Many thanks Dr. Lofthouse - much appreciated...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
throw in "modalities" for good luck


Explanation:
Otherwise you might as well throw out either of "terms" or "conditions", since I cannot honestly tell you what the difference might be!

"Modalities", I suspect is a subset of "terms and conditions" (or of "terms" or of "conditions") pertaining more to the "active", "functional" aspects. If terms and/or conditions say you seek arbitration in the event of dispute, "modalities" define the process for seeking that arbitration.

Also, look thoroughly through your doc. and check that at some point you don't have separate chapter headings for termes, modalités, and conditions, otherwise you might paint yourself into a corner.

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-10-02 15:42:50 GMT)
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Let it be made lucid and clear that I myself don't think or believe it is usual or commonplace in the fine Gallic language that is French for modalités/i> to be found alongside, adjacent to, between, or otherwise in the vicinity of the customary, more usual termes et conditions. People, cultures, civilizations, their times, epochs, customs, habits, practices and use of language and terminology change. Move on and forward.

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-10-02 15:44:04 GMT)
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For good measure, and to add belt to braces:
Let it be made lucid and clear that I myself don't think or believe it is usual or commonplace in the fine Gallic language that is French for modalités to be found alongside, adjacent to, between, or otherwise in the vicinity of the customary, more usual termes et conditions. People, cultures, civilizations, their times, epochs, customs, habits, practices and use of language and terminology change. Move on and forward.



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Note added at 1 hr (2009-10-02 15:45:58 GMT)
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For good measure, and to add belt to braces:
Let it be made lucid and clear that I myself don't think or believe it is usual or commonplace in the fine Gallic language that is French for modalités to be found alongside, adjacent to, between, or otherwise in the vicinity of the customary, more usual termes et conditions. People, cultures, civilizations, their times, epochs, customs, habits, practices and use of language and terminology change. Move on and forward.

Note to the technical people: could we please have a "View" option for added notes, since you've given use the (rather cumbersome) possibility of using bold type and italics?

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Note added at 2 hrs (2009-10-02 16:04:28 GMT)
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Let's get some facts so we can compare them apples with other apples, not with oranges:
"termes et conditions" 5,810,000 ghits
"termes, modalités, et conditions" - 110 ghits

It is unusual, not the norm in French, but it IS said, and relatively more commonly in French than in English.

If the writer made the conscious choice - I hope it was a conscious choice - to use the word, who are we to decry it?

As I've intimated, I'd hate to have returned 50 pages in which I've referred repeatedly to "terms and conditions" to find that at the same time a collegue translating the next 50 pages had a chapter "Termes, Modalités, et Conditions" broken down into three separate sub-headings!

Bourth (X)
Local time: 03:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 425

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bashiqa: You could also add 'why' and 'wherefore' for good measure.
11 mins

disagree  Chris Hall: "terms, modalities and conditions" = 5 ghits; "terms and conditions" = 274,000,000 ghits. I think that this is pretty conclusive.
1 hr
  -> That's pretty conclusive all right, only I'm not sure what of. See above

agree  blomguib (X): we (and I count myself as being part of the legal people), are so obsessed with covering everything, that frequently different words are used in the same sentence, with the same meaning....in which case...translate and leave nothing out!
2 hrs
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