Liquidités et créances sur les établissements de crédit

16:35 Apr 13, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Finance (general)
French term or phrase: Liquidités et créances sur les établissements de crédit
Section heading in company annual report
moco (X)


Summary of answers provided
5 +1Cash and borrowings due from credit institutions
Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
4 +1Cash, cash equivalents, and loans and advances to banks
Christopher RH


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Liquidités et créances sur les établissements de crédit
Cash and borrowings due from credit institutions


Explanation:
i would say

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Note added at 19 mins (2005-04-13 16:54:46 GMT)
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Actually, I would change it and just say:

Cash borrowings [due] from credit institutions

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Note added at 2 days 9 mins (2005-04-15 16:45:39 GMT)
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I am in the middle of doing a Bank AR and the other translator said: cash and amounts owed..but just go take a look at the AR\'s of any large UK or US or Canadian bank, for example...borrowings is what is used...also funds in some cases

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Note added at 2 days 10 mins (2005-04-15 16:46:06 GMT)
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Cash borrowings by credit institutions..that should settle it

Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 763

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlie Bavington (X): or maybe "repayments owed by cr. inst". It might just be me, but initially the juxtaposition of "borrowing" and "from" led me to think you had it the wrong way round at first. I had to read it twice :-) Needs to be clear who owes whom.
7 hrs
  -> you will never see that in a banking annual report...go look luv

neutral  Christopher RH: yes - maybe simply "sums due from..." // Edit: this is NOT said to be a bank's report, and "borrowings due from" most certainly is NOT common in any bank or company reports. http://www.google.com/search?&q="borrowings due from"
1 day 17 hrs
  -> you never see sums due from in bank annual reports written in English..borrowings from and to or suchlike..go read the annual reports of UK and US banks
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2 days 3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Liquidités et créances sur les établissements de crédit
Cash, cash equivalents, and loans and advances to banks


Explanation:
If this is indeed a bank's financial statements, it would appear that cash and cash equivalents, on the one hand, and loans and advances to banks, on the other hand, occupy a particular section of the balance sheet.

See, for example, the RBS annual report at http://www.investors.rbs.com/downloads/RBS_Group_Accounts_20...
or
http://www.hbosplc.com/investors/results/sfs/2004/balanceshe...

In fact, the first few items on a typical (UK English) bank balance sheet are:
- Cash and balances at central banks
- Items in course of collection
- Treasury bills and other eligible bills
- Loans and advances to banks
- Loans and advances to customers
etc.


Now I still don't understand exactly what "liquidités" is doing there. It does appear to be typical in Swiss bank reports (such as Renteria : http://www.renteria.ch/download/pdf_files/sfp_21050_1_jb_01_... )
In that report, though it talks of "Liquidités et créances sur les banques" but then has separate items in the balance sheet for cash, on the one hand, and debts due from banks on the other.

Another Swiss report, Bond Partners - http://www.bpl-bondpartners.ch/Presse80.pdf - is clearer since it appears to lump all cash, cash equivalents and loans to banks together in the consolidated balance sheet under a single heading: "Liquidités et créances sur les banques"
Finally, DeGroof also appears to divide all of the liquid assets up into "liquidités" and "créances sur les banques". http://www.degroof.be/pdf/03-bds-comptesann.pdf


So it would depend on the context: either it is simply "cash and loans to banks" (which I feel is a touch restrictive in English) or, if you want to follow the UK pattern and if it really does group the different items together, "Cash, cash equivalents, and loans and advances to banks"

Christopher RH
Local time: 23:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 67

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  coco32
401 days
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