duree de l\\\'exercice

English translation: yes (to answer your question)

02:26 Apr 16, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general) / financial statements
French term or phrase: duree de l\\\'exercice
I'm translating financial statements, and am slightly perplexed by one phrase, "duree de l'exercice explimee en nombre de mois". I've always understood "exercice" in this context to be financial year, in which case it's a bit of a puzzle as to why you'd need to spell out the number of months...unless for some reason the business was operating for less than the full year. Is that all it is? TIA
Sarah Walls
Australia
Local time: 13:41
English translation:yes (to answer your question)
Explanation:
In a "regular" situation, then yes, an 'exercice' would be a financial year (UK) of 12 months. But companies start up and close down, of course, and in these cases the period can be less than a year.
I don't know the rules in France for companies, but in the UK (hence the possibility may exist in other countries), the first "year" for a company can be more than 12 months, and companies also have the right to change when their financial year starts and ends which can also give rise to "years" that aren't 12 months.

I notice from my Inland Revenue Self Assessment form sitting on my desk that they call it an "accounting period" (for self employed in the UK) and this seems to me to be a very reasonable way of expressing "exercice" on a financial statement without using the word "year".

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Note added at 6 hrs 27 mins (2005-04-16 08:53:53 GMT)
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As luck would have it, I\'ve found an annual report from a UK company I happen to have some shares in, which happens to cover 18 months as they changed their year end date from December to June, and they call it the \"period\" in column headings.
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 04:41
Grading comment
Thanks, Charlie. It was probably a dumb question, but thanks for clarifying it so knowledgeably.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3Below
Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
3 +1yes (to answer your question)
Charlie Bavington (X)


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
duree de l\'exercice exprimé en nombre de mois
Below


Explanation:
Bristish = financial year
US. = fiscal year

durée de l'exercice exprimé en nombre de mois = duration of the financial/fiscal year in months

Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
New Caledonia
Local time: 14:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cristián Bianchi-Bruna
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Gwac
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
duree de l\'exercice
yes (to answer your question)


Explanation:
In a "regular" situation, then yes, an 'exercice' would be a financial year (UK) of 12 months. But companies start up and close down, of course, and in these cases the period can be less than a year.
I don't know the rules in France for companies, but in the UK (hence the possibility may exist in other countries), the first "year" for a company can be more than 12 months, and companies also have the right to change when their financial year starts and ends which can also give rise to "years" that aren't 12 months.

I notice from my Inland Revenue Self Assessment form sitting on my desk that they call it an "accounting period" (for self employed in the UK) and this seems to me to be a very reasonable way of expressing "exercice" on a financial statement without using the word "year".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 27 mins (2005-04-16 08:53:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As luck would have it, I\'ve found an annual report from a UK company I happen to have some shares in, which happens to cover 18 months as they changed their year end date from December to June, and they call it the \"period\" in column headings.

Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 04:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 121
Grading comment
Thanks, Charlie. It was probably a dumb question, but thanks for clarifying it so knowledgeably.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher RH: yes - but I don't see any problem with calling an 18-month period a "financial year" nonetheless...
2 hrs
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