j'en profite

English translation: yes please!

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:j'en profite
English translation:yes please!
Entered by: Tony M

10:57 Dec 15, 2016
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / website
French term or phrase: j'en profite
Hi there,

This is for a website of an international retail group.

"Vous recevrez par email toutes nos nouveautés"
You can either click on "Non, merci" or "j'en profite"
I can't find anything suitable for "j'en profite", the best I've come up with is "I'll make the most of it" or "make the most of it"..not very snappy as you can see!

Your suggestions are welcome :)
Thank you.
Louisa T.
Tunisia
Local time: 07:35
yes please!
Explanation:
In this instance, better keep well away from anything too literal!

The sense in other contexts might be rendered by "I'd like to take advantage of this offer" or "Take advantage of this offer right away!" — however, in the specific context given, I really think those would be way overkill, and a simply No thanks / Yes please! couplet is all you need

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 minutes (2016-12-15 11:20:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As would typically be found on a British website, Asker!
I received one of these just this morning (clicking as usual on "No thanks"!)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 heure (2016-12-15 11:59:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

traditionally, the 'Yes!' button is usually large and in cheerful, positive colours — and almost always with the ! — while the 'No' button is often grey or black, small, and generally uninviting; so that everything is done visually and psychologically to persaude you to say yes.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 heures (2016-12-15 18:51:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, "You bet!" is not a bad solution... though I'd say it could have a slightly American feel to it for British ear, rather redolent of '50s America, 'Happy Days!' etc. Certainly an expression too coloured to be able to be used in absolutely ALL contexts...
"Would you like a coupon for $1 off a Big Mac?" — "You bet!"
"Would you like a copy of our latest catalogue of Cartier diamond jewellery?" — er... nope!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 heures (2016-12-15 18:55:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There's an interesting example of one of these snappy 'answer' phrases that keeps cropping up in one of the big software apps, and it laughably wrongly translated into FR. It's to do with accepting their cookie policy or something, and the American original is "Got it!" — in other words, "OK, I understand!"
Sadly, the FR translation is something long the lines of « Obtiens-le ! »
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:35
Grading comment
Thank you Tony for going to so much trouble :) Much appreciated!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +10yes please!
Tony M
4(This is) useful for me / Of use to me
LaraBarnett
3I accept
Tony Conde


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
j\'en profite
I accept


Explanation:
I accept

Tony Conde
Spain
Local time: 08:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in FrenchFrench
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
j\'en profite
(This is) useful for me / Of use to me


Explanation:
A couple of idea.

I find a lot of websites these days are using a lot of non-conventional language and a personal style in their email preference options

LaraBarnett
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:35
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 42
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Lara!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: "non-conventional" and "personal style" yes — but neither of these sounds terribly idiomatic to me. Something like "Yes, I can use this!" might work better
46 mins

neutral  Michele Fauble: Context
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
j'en profite
yes please!


Explanation:
In this instance, better keep well away from anything too literal!

The sense in other contexts might be rendered by "I'd like to take advantage of this offer" or "Take advantage of this offer right away!" — however, in the specific context given, I really think those would be way overkill, and a simply No thanks / Yes please! couplet is all you need

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 minutes (2016-12-15 11:20:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As would typically be found on a British website, Asker!
I received one of these just this morning (clicking as usual on "No thanks"!)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 heure (2016-12-15 11:59:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

traditionally, the 'Yes!' button is usually large and in cheerful, positive colours — and almost always with the ! — while the 'No' button is often grey or black, small, and generally uninviting; so that everything is done visually and psychologically to persaude you to say yes.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 heures (2016-12-15 18:51:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, "You bet!" is not a bad solution... though I'd say it could have a slightly American feel to it for British ear, rather redolent of '50s America, 'Happy Days!' etc. Certainly an expression too coloured to be able to be used in absolutely ALL contexts...
"Would you like a coupon for $1 off a Big Mac?" — "You bet!"
"Would you like a copy of our latest catalogue of Cartier diamond jewellery?" — er... nope!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 heures (2016-12-15 18:55:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There's an interesting example of one of these snappy 'answer' phrases that keeps cropping up in one of the big software apps, and it laughably wrongly translated into FR. It's to do with accepting their cookie policy or something, and the American original is "Got it!" — in other words, "OK, I understand!"
Sadly, the FR translation is something long the lines of « Obtiens-le ! »

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 320
Grading comment
Thank you Tony for going to so much trouble :) Much appreciated!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, I'm trying to think of what a British website would have as equivalent here..

Asker: :))

Asker: I just thought of "you bet!" but have used "yes please" afterall, thanks :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles!

agree  Jennifer White
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Jennifer!

agree  Tony Conde
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Tony!

agree  B D Finch
12 mins
  -> Thanks, B!

agree  Verginia Ophof
35 mins
  -> Thanks, Verginia!

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: With "Non, merci", "Yes, please" is automatic.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nikki!

agree  Michele Fauble
7 hrs
  -> Merci, Michele !

agree  Juan Jacob: I'm on.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Juan!

agree  Susan Monnereau
21 hrs
  -> Thanks, Susan!

agree  AllegroTrans: yes
23 hrs
  -> Thanks, C!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search