Impressionnant

English translation: it's really something

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:impressionnant
English translation:it's really something
Entered by: Tony M

11:16 May 30, 2019
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / Colloquialisms
French term or phrase: Impressionnant
Hello. This is spoken French by a lady describing an exercise test that she did with a trainer.

"pour moi, de faire un test d'effort,
c’est vrai que c’est impressionnant".

I'm not sure whether 'impressionant' here has the meaning of 'exciting'/'great' or that it was 'difficult'/'strenuous'. Is she just saying 'Doing an exercise test was great' or 'was really hard' or something else?
Thanks.
Christine Birch
United Kingdom
it's really something
Explanation:
From the way it is worded "pour moi... de faire...", I think this lady is saying it was really something / quite an achievement to find her doing an exercise test — perhaps because she has a reputation as a couch potatot? Or maybe simply because she's unwell...

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Note added at 9 hrs (2019-05-30 20:28:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Katsy point out in her discussion post, in the source language, 'impressionant' can often first and foremost mean 'made an impression on me (etc.).
Without more of the context here, we can't tell if the lady is impressed by the fact she actually managed to complete the test at all, or erhaps (as I read it) possibly in a rather more jocular sense: "Who ever would have thought I'd be seen dead in an exercise room!" etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 hrs (2019-05-31 05:30:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It may of course, be "I'm impressed with myself" or "People should be impressed with me..." — perhaps among other possiiblities too. But in essence, my suggestion seems to pretty much cover all those possibilities.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:57
Grading comment
Thanks! From the rest of the piece, I think she was being jocular - it's really something for me to do.... etc. Your solution sounds spot on!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
2 +11it's really something
Tony M
4 +2impressive
El Mehdi Hakkou
4 +1Spectacular, impressive
Ava Wells-Quantrell
3 +1(it makes) quite an impression
katsy
3It is really striking/does strike you/make you realise
Conor Jarrett
3really awesome/really great
AllegroTrans


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Spectacular, impressive


Explanation:
I’m very sure that the term can be translated as her finishing the test was impressive (or even spectacular).

Ava Wells-Quantrell
United States
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: just with impressive. unless a lot more context is available
41 mins

agree  philgoddard
58 mins

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: no, spectacular is OTT and impressive doesn't really fit.
1 hr

neutral  Charles Davis: It is quite likely that this is not what she means at all.
1 hr

neutral  AllegroTrans: both words sound unnatural in the context
7 hrs
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
impressive


Explanation:
I would keep it simple and use impressive as translation.
She is impressed by this exercise.
...it's really impressive.

El Mehdi Hakkou
Morocco
Local time: 09:57
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Lara Barnett: But the usage of this word is so often not the same between English and French. In this case it does not match in my opinion.// what I mean is mainly that we would not use this in conversation when talking about ourselves.
24 mins

agree  writeaway: certainly not dead wrong. it's the first thing that comes to mind...
36 mins

agree  philgoddard: Nothing wrong with this.
56 mins

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: no, not right here but not completely wrong either.
1 hr

agree  Nicolas Gambardella: I aIt seems what the lady is saying is that considering who she is, what her condition is, or something like that, to make such an effort is surprising.
1 hr

neutral  Charles Davis: It is quite likely that this is not what she means at all.
1 hr
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
It is really striking/does strike you/make you realise


Explanation:
It is hard to tell here, but I think this might be it. As the other have already said, there are several different options, sometimes very similar or different.

I think tests like this one are done at the start to get an idea of the person's fitness, before they proceed with a program. Maybe when the person did the test, it was only then that they realised how (un)fit they were.

Conor Jarrett
Ireland
Local time: 09:57
Native speaker of: English
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +11
c'est impressionnant
it's really something


Explanation:
From the way it is worded "pour moi... de faire...", I think this lady is saying it was really something / quite an achievement to find her doing an exercise test — perhaps because she has a reputation as a couch potatot? Or maybe simply because she's unwell...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2019-05-30 20:28:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Katsy point out in her discussion post, in the source language, 'impressionant' can often first and foremost mean 'made an impression on me (etc.).
Without more of the context here, we can't tell if the lady is impressed by the fact she actually managed to complete the test at all, or erhaps (as I read it) possibly in a rather more jocular sense: "Who ever would have thought I'd be seen dead in an exercise room!" etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 hrs (2019-05-31 05:30:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It may of course, be "I'm impressed with myself" or "People should be impressed with me..." — perhaps among other possiiblities too. But in essence, my suggestion seems to pretty much cover all those possibilities.

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 332
Grading comment
Thanks! From the rest of the piece, I think she was being jocular - it's really something for me to do.... etc. Your solution sounds spot on!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lara Barnett: I actually like your explanation of "quite an achievement" better.
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Lara!

agree  Victoria Britten: With this very short extract, out of context, I don't feel confident about interpreting what the lady means; however, your translation neatly covers just about any of the most likely ones!
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Victoria!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: yes, covers a multitude
41 mins
  -> Thanks, Yvonne!

agree  Philippa Smith: I prefer your "quite an achievement" proposal (or "a real achievement")
45 mins
  -> Thznks, Philippa!

agree  Charles Davis: I agree with Victoria. It could mean all sorts of things (exactly the same with "impresionante" in Spanish, btw). This covers just about all the possibilities. The guesses people are making as to what she's implying could be wrong.
53 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles!

agree  Ph_B (X)
1 hr
  -> Merci, Ph_B !

agree  Louise TAYLOR: yes, that covers all sorts of possible meanings
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Louise!

agree  AllegroTrans
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, C!

agree  James A. Walsh
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, James!

agree  katsy
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Katsy!

agree  Michele Fauble
12 hrs
  -> Merci, Michele !
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1 day 6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
really awesome/really great


Explanation:
I thhik all would depend on this lady's age and style of speech, but I offer these (fairly) modern possibilities. I am sure there are even more modern terms but I am an old geezer and have probably missed them.

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 83
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1 day 9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(it makes) quite an impression


Explanation:
Taking advantage of the thoughts and suggestions already proposed, and given what I say in the DB. This has been with me all day, the idea that "impressionnant" can imply something scary. For child can be "impressionné' if s/he is told off loudly by an adult or if he is confronted by a barking/jumping dog. (I won't repeat the example I quoted above)
I tend to feel that the person finds it quite daunting to undergo this endurance/cardiac stress test.
But as it is not totally clear I have tried to find something which would fit various ideas.


katsy
Local time: 10:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ormiston: your notion of 'daunting' is close to what 'impressionant' often mean
13 hrs
  -> Thanks ormiston:-) Yes, my gut feeling is that this is what's meant but I have to admit that it is not 100% clear in the text given
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