cool raoul relax max

English translation: Chill, Bill.

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:cool raoul relax max
English translation:Chill, Bill.
Entered by: jenny morenos

17:25 Apr 6, 2020
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
French term or phrase: cool raoul relax max
hello. How can we translate cool raoul relax max ? This is a colloquial expression . Thanks in advance

- je suis désespéré. J'ai un long devoir à faire pour lundi et on est samedi, et j'ai même pas commencé. Je suis affolé. Que puis-je faire ? J'ai aucune idée. Oh non !! Je veux pas avoir une mauvaise note !!!!!

- calme -toi. T'en fais pas. ça va aller. Cool raoul relax max. Je peux t'aider si tu le souhaites. Ainsi tu va avancer plus vite. Tu gagnes rien à t'agiter de la sorte. Il te reste encore deux jours, ça va.

relax ? loosen up ? be calm ?
jenny morenos
France
Chill, Bill.
Explanation:
This is an Australian expression - commonly used, in my experience. Especially when the speaker wants to use humour to calm the other person. However, other posters' suggestions may have overtaken mine these days: I hear Chillax regularly, but usually as in -'What are you up to?' -'Just chillaxing'
I personally like Chill, Bill for the rhyme, just as 'take a chill pill'.
Selected response from:

Alison Windsor
Australia
Local time: 12:32
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +5take a chill pill
Liath Gleeson
5Chill, Bill.
Alison Windsor
4chillax
Dumaz & Cowling
3Chill yourself
Margaret Morrison
3don't get your knickers in a knot
Verginia Ophof


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
take a chill pill


Explanation:
This is a very casual way to say "don't worry", and it fits the tone of the text you've provided.

Liath Gleeson
United States
Local time: 17:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: super fun expression, i like it! thank you so much for helping me


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Perfect!
4 mins
  -> Thank you Phil!

agree  Tony M: Yes, though I'd say very US — I don't believe this would be a common expression in GB.
7 mins
  -> Thanks Tony. I'm from Ireland and we say it there. It could be a generational thing. I also wouldn't inflict any of the *other* things we say in Ireland on this poor question asker... I feel like "relax the kaks" might be rather too colloquial :)

neutral  Dumaz & Cowling: A bit odd and specifically American, as pointed out by Tony!
15 mins

agree  Mollie Milesi: I like the way the 'chill pill' reproduces the rhyme as well.
37 mins
  -> Thank you, Mollie.

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: yep, commonly used in Ireland. Sure I've seen/heard it in UK too..
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yvonne!

agree  Susan Higgins: I'm based in UK and this doesn't strike me as a particularly US expression nowadays, though I've certainly never relaxed my kaks :-)
14 hrs
  -> "relax the kaks" is a uniquely Irish, possibly even uniquely Dublin, expression to my knowledge Susan! :)

neutral  John Simpson: I would say 'relax'. I think I heard 'take a chill pill' once in the 90s.
19 hrs
  -> I have to disagree with that one - translating "cool raoul relax max" to something as neutral as "relax" totally disregards the tone of the original text.
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
chillax


Explanation:
Created from the combination of chill and relax, chillax seems a good option here, as it is a trendy expression that is often used in the media (TV, series, etc.).

Example sentence(s):
  • Nothing special, just going to chillax at home.
  • Just chillax, man!
Dumaz & Cowling
France
Local time: 02:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
Notes to answerer
Asker: i didn't know chillax, thank you very much, what a funny word !

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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Chill yourself


Explanation:
My tame 13 year-old (GB) says "Chill yourself" is used these days. They do like all these patois-type expressions.

Margaret Morrison
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: i didn't know this expresison, sounds cool ! thanks for helping me translating this !


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Simpson: 'It's not deep' is, apparently, another expression used by teenagers
18 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
don't get your knickers in a knot


Explanation:
suggestion

Verginia Ophof
Belize
Local time: 19:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 53
Notes to answerer
Asker: thank you very much, i had never heard that expresion

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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Chill, Bill.


Explanation:
This is an Australian expression - commonly used, in my experience. Especially when the speaker wants to use humour to calm the other person. However, other posters' suggestions may have overtaken mine these days: I hear Chillax regularly, but usually as in -'What are you up to?' -'Just chillaxing'
I personally like Chill, Bill for the rhyme, just as 'take a chill pill'.

Alison Windsor
Australia
Local time: 12:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: very fun and nice expresison, thank you very much for helping me!

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