mais une exigence ou un combat.

English translation: but rather to make demands or fight for a cause

00:35 Jun 30, 2020
French to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
French term or phrase: mais une exigence ou un combat.
Evidemment on pourrait fonder un orchestre, ou faire du théâtre dans la rue. Animer, comme on dit, le quartier. Souder ensemble les gens d’une rue ou d’un groupe de rues par autre chose qu’une simple connivence, mais une exigence ou un combat.
peyman eshqi
Iran
Local time: 18:08
English translation:but rather to make demands or fight for a cause
Explanation:
I think that this translation conveys the intent of the original sentence. Yet, there must be a shorter way to say it.
Selected response from:

Pablo Molina
United States
Local time: 07:38
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2but (for) a need or a cause
AllegroTrans
4 +1but rather to make demands or fight for a cause
Pablo Molina
4 +1but to meet a need or fight for something
philgoddard
4but by making demands on them [the people], making them fight
Séverine Watson
4but a call or cause
SafeTex
3But (instead) to demand or protest
ormiston
2but rather to put on a show or competition
David Hollywood
Summary of reference entries provided
David Hollywood
quote from Georges Perec
cchat

Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
but rather to put on a show or competition


Explanation:
not much more than a guess

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2020-06-30 00:54:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"or a competition" is better in English

David Hollywood
Local time: 11:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
but to meet a need or fight for something


Explanation:
I assume that's what "combat"means.

philgoddard
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 163

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Séverine Watson: This would work if "combat" is intended in a positive way, however it strikes me that it may also be construed as the idea of tackling or combatting injustices for example. I may be off the mark here, but just wanted to float that idea!
3 hrs
  -> Tackling or combating injustice means fighting for justice.

agree  Victoria Britten
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
but a call or cause


Explanation:
Hello

It's not just about having two words that start with a "C" following "connivance" but at very first glance, I thought that "combat" (in French) was "cause" in English (to fight for a cause).

SafeTex
France
Local time: 15:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 19
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
But (instead) to demand or protest


Explanation:
My stab at it. Using it as a tool, to tackle an issue (I sense the underlying French idea of 'engagé').

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 heures (2020-06-30 07:39:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I.e. to make a point

ormiston
Local time: 15:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 82
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
but by making demands on them [the people], making them fight


Explanation:
This is the term taken from page 82 of the book entitled 'Georges Perenc's Geographies' talking about communities, neighbourhoods and "togetherness".

Here's the exerpt: "[Perenc] would be less opposed to the collective practice of street theatre, or of music, and he does not close down the idea of there being other means of binding people - 'making demands on them, making them fight'..."

I hope the link works properly as it came from my Google search:
https://books.google.fr/books?id=_i26DwAAQBAJ&pg=PA82&lpg=PA...

Big thanks to @cchat for the helpful reference.


    https://books.google.fr/books?id=_i26DwAAQBAJ&pg=PA82&lpg=PA82&dq=%22georges+perec%22+%22combat%22+%22exigence%22&source=bl&ots=wguVAAnvjK&s
Séverine Watson
France
Local time: 15:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
but (for) a need or a cause


Explanation:
Not happy with the idea of a fight or a struggle


AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 83

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cathy Rosamond: Short and to the point.
3 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Brigitte Pirot
21 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
but rather to make demands or fight for a cause


Explanation:
I think that this translation conveys the intent of the original sentence. Yet, there must be a shorter way to say it.

Pablo Molina
United States
Local time: 07:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


10 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference

Reference information:
In rhetoric, exigence is an issue, problem, or situation that causes or prompts someone to write or speak. The term exigence comes from the Latin word for "demand." It was popularized in rhetorical studies by Lloyd Bitzer in "The Rhetorical Situation" ("Philosophy and Rhetoric," 1968).

David Hollywood
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
neutral  philgoddard: Exigence means need.
3 hrs
agree  ormiston: Phil, not necessarily
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: quote from Georges Perec

Reference information:
It's apparently a frequently quoted text by Georges Perec.


    Reference: http://ahqg.free.fr/ahqgv2/html/dcdg/cotegare1.pdf
cchat
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  writeaway
40 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search