POUR l’expiration / POUR le terme contractuel

English translation: give notice of [in certain expressions: for, to]

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:donner congé pour
English translation:give notice of [in certain expressions: for, to]
Entered by: Tony M

16:50 May 13, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Commercial lease
French term or phrase: POUR l’expiration / POUR le terme contractuel
This is in a commercial lease for a building - queried terms in the asterisks.

2.2. Par dérogation expresse à l’article L. 145-4 du Code de Commerce et dans la mesure où les Locaux sont loués pour un usage exclusif de bureaux, le Preneur renonce irrévocablement à la faculté de donner congé *pour l’expiration* de la première et deuxième période triennale du Bail. Le Preneur ne pourra en conséquence délivrer congé pour la première fois que *pour le terme contractuel* du Bail.

I would imagine that this would be "upon"?
Elizabeth Niklewska
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:14
give notice of / for
Explanation:
You see, this exactly confirms what I was saying in your other question: the Tenant is giving up their right to terminate the lease early, at each of the 3-year points.

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Note added at 12 hrs (2018-05-14 05:49:00 GMT)
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As A/T kindly points out 'notice of...' is probably the commonest expression, and 'notice to...' is used in some contexts (e.g. 'notice to quit'); I suggested 'notice for...' because at the time there was one other specific usage that crossed my mind, but which has sadly now slipped it! Anyway, you can just ignore the 'for' option :-)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:14
Grading comment
Thanks
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1give notice of / for
Tony M
4 -3upon the expiration/at the end of the contract
Francois Boye


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
upon the expiration/at the end of the contract


Explanation:
My take

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 18:14
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  writeaway: Terme is pour le term is at the end of the contract? Here too, your 'take' is mis-taken
11 mins

disagree  Tony M: This is not 'upon', since it is talking about giving notice BEFORE the planned end of the lease.
19 mins

disagree  AllegroTrans: Notice is given before the lease terminates, not "upon"; horse before cart, think about it; and "contract" would not be the operative word for a lease
5 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
donner congé POUR
give notice of / for


Explanation:
You see, this exactly confirms what I was saying in your other question: the Tenant is giving up their right to terminate the lease early, at each of the 3-year points.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs (2018-05-14 05:49:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As A/T kindly points out 'notice of...' is probably the commonest expression, and 'notice to...' is used in some contexts (e.g. 'notice to quit'); I suggested 'notice for...' because at the time there was one other specific usage that crossed my mind, but which has sadly now slipped it! Anyway, you can just ignore the 'for' option :-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 323
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Francois Boye: for or upon:what's the difference in fact?
1 hr
  -> In EN, the difference is clear and VITAL; give notice of something that is going to happen / give notice upon something happening (i.e. when something happens).

agree  AllegroTrans: give notice of: standard correct legal English, as used in the real world; have seen this more times than I can count; "give notice to terminate" is also widely used
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, C! Yes, + 1 or 2 other specific formulations — but all with the same underlying meaning!
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