La succession de feu [...], ouverte ab initio

English translation: The estate of the late [...], initially opened ...

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:La succession de feu [...], ouverte ab initio
English translation:The estate of the late [...], initially opened ...
Entered by: B D Finch

15:02 Oct 21, 2018
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Contested estate
French term or phrase: La succession de feu [...], ouverte ab initio
La succession de feu [...], ouverte ab initio En vertu du jugement rendu sous RC [...] par le Tribunal de Paix de [...] mais ici prise par Monsieur [...] en sa qualité de liquidateur...

Opening phrase in a settlement agreement regarding a contested plot of land per an inheritance.
Richard Vranch
Local time: 01:23
The estate of the late [...], initially opened ...
Explanation:
If this is for the UK, Latin is now (officially) to be avoided in favour of plain English. It seems that goes for Australia too.

www.plainenglish.co.uk/files/legalguide.pdf

https://www.gracelawson.com.au/plain-english-for-lawyers/
‘from the beginning’ instead of ‘ab initio’

Of course, if it's for the US, you can stick to the Latin.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2018-10-21 20:20:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There are attempts at reform in Canada too:

https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/07/06/1534296/0/...
"Ontario law firm sponsors $2,500 Plain English Contest: Inter alia, the Party of the Second Part should always understand the contract terms of the Party of the First Part ab initio

"TORONTO, July 06, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Canadian business people shouldn’t have to waste their time translating “legalese” into English, according to Michael R. Henry, Managing Partner at Ontario-based law firm Houser Henry & Syron LLP (HHS).

"HHS is sponsoring a province-wide contest to identify and reward the most succinct, most precise and most easily understood contract in effect in Ontario this year. The winner of the contest will receive a $2,500.00 cash prize and a copy of The Canadian Oxford Dictionary."
Selected response from:

B D Finch
France
Local time: 02:23
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4The estate of the late [...], initially opened ...
B D Finch
3 +5The estate of the late ..., opened ab initio
Trevino Translations


  

Answers


57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
The estate of the late ..., opened ab initio


Explanation:
Hope this helps.


    https://definitions.uslegal.com/a/ab-initio/
Trevino Translations
France
Local time: 02:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Well yes... but where was the problem?
21 mins

agree  AllegroTrans
1 hr

agree  philgoddard: Or just "initially opened".
2 hrs

agree  Azhar Zafar
4 hrs

agree  writeaway: Well, at least the start of the translation is now clear. Like Tony, I'm not sure what the problem is. Initially opened, as Phil suggested, also works of course if one wants to avoid using the Latin
5 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
The estate of the late [...], initially opened ...


Explanation:
If this is for the UK, Latin is now (officially) to be avoided in favour of plain English. It seems that goes for Australia too.

www.plainenglish.co.uk/files/legalguide.pdf

https://www.gracelawson.com.au/plain-english-for-lawyers/
‘from the beginning’ instead of ‘ab initio’

Of course, if it's for the US, you can stick to the Latin.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2018-10-21 20:20:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There are attempts at reform in Canada too:

https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/07/06/1534296/0/...
"Ontario law firm sponsors $2,500 Plain English Contest: Inter alia, the Party of the Second Part should always understand the contract terms of the Party of the First Part ab initio

"TORONTO, July 06, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Canadian business people shouldn’t have to waste their time translating “legalese” into English, according to Michael R. Henry, Managing Partner at Ontario-based law firm Houser Henry & Syron LLP (HHS).

"HHS is sponsoring a province-wide contest to identify and reward the most succinct, most precise and most easily understood contract in effect in Ontario this year. The winner of the contest will receive a $2,500.00 cash prize and a copy of The Canadian Oxford Dictionary."

B D Finch
France
Local time: 02:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 353
2 corroborated select projects
in this pair and field What is ProZ.com Project History(SM)?

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: Good point. Worth emphasising, for the UK, that it's official: a whole series of Latinisms were swept away by Lords Woolf (Civil Procedure Rules 1998) and Falconer (Civil Procedure (Modification of Supreme Court Act 1981) Order 1033/2004).
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Charles

agree  ph-b (X): "If this is for the UK, Latin is now (officially) to be avoided in favour of plain English."
7 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Trevino Translations: Thanks for the information about use of Latin in the UK.
13 hrs
  -> Thanks TT!

agree  AllegroTrans: Agree about "official" but many lawyers and judges continue to use Latin
16 hrs
  -> Thanks Chris. They should be strongly discouraged from showing off!
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