Help with unwieldy clause on the sharing of information

English translation: know-how

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:savoir-faire (patents)
English translation:know-how
Entered by: Erik Macki

00:41 Oct 17, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / fixed price contracts - software
French term or phrase: Help with unwieldy clause on the sharing of information
Chacune des Parties disposera de toute manière qu'elle jugera appropriée, des idées, concepts, savoir-faire ou techniques qui ne font pas l'objet d'une protection légale et relatifs au traitement de l'information, développés ou fournis par l'une des deux Parties ou conjointement, lors de la réalisation du Contrat

Here's my effort so far (looking for suggestions to improve):


Each Party will apply, in any way it deems appropriate, any ideas, concepts, savoir-faire or techniques not protected by copyright which relate to the processing of data,... développés ou fournis par l'une des deux Parties ou conjointement, lors de la réalisation du Contrat.

I am a bit confused by the order here - I think the 'developpes ou fournis par' refers to the list of ideas, concepts, etc. referred to at the beginning - but am trying change it round to flow better in English... any suggestions?
French2English
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:56
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Explanation:
First, just a comment that "savoir-faire" should be translated here as "know-how." These are correlated terms of art in intellectual property law.

Second, you should say "that relate to" or "relating to." Use "which" generally only for nonrestrictive relative clauses. This type of thing can sometimes matter in legalese like this.

Last, I think that it's best to stay closer to the original rather than try to "improve" it in English--in particular since this is contractual language where it is more important for the translation to be accurate than beautiful. I would say simply, "data,..., developed or provided by one of the two Parties or jointly..." This is in fact plenty clear in English and close to the source phrasing.
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Erik Macki
Local time: 16:56
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Explanation:
First, just a comment that "savoir-faire" should be translated here as "know-how." These are correlated terms of art in intellectual property law.

Second, you should say "that relate to" or "relating to." Use "which" generally only for nonrestrictive relative clauses. This type of thing can sometimes matter in legalese like this.

Last, I think that it's best to stay closer to the original rather than try to "improve" it in English--in particular since this is contractual language where it is more important for the translation to be accurate than beautiful. I would say simply, "data,..., developed or provided by one of the two Parties or jointly..." This is in fact plenty clear in English and close to the source phrasing.

Erik Macki
Local time: 16:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7
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