tel l'imperator

English translation: imperiously

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tel l'imperator
English translation:imperiously
Entered by: dholmes (X)

16:51 Nov 29, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / legal suit
French term or phrase: tel l'imperator
"Non seulement Monsieur X a manqué à son obligation de paiement......., mais de surcroit, tel l'imperator, dès le 1er Juillet il congedia sans autre frome la société X, pour ne pas s'être pliée à ses diktats........"
Ideas welcome!
dholmes (X)
France
Local time: 01:41
imperiously
Explanation:
(It took a while.) This one is without the value judgments! i.e. "like an emperor"
Selected response from:

Alan Tolerton
United States
Local time: 19:41
Grading comment
That's just fine ! Thanks a lot
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2imperiously
Alan Tolerton
3in an attitude / posture worthy of an Emperor
kironne


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
imperiously


Explanation:
(It took a while.) This one is without the value judgments! i.e. "like an emperor"

Alan Tolerton
United States
Local time: 19:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
That's just fine ! Thanks a lot

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bourth (X): But I agree, ProZ practice is to tack comments on to one's initial answer (this is my preference too). BTW, the value judgment is self-contained here.
45 mins

agree  Olga Cartlidge: Je suis aussi d accord avec Bourth : "the value judgment is self-contained here."
1 hr
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
in an attitude / posture worthy of an Emperor


Explanation:


Just a suggestion


Definitions of Imperator:

# A commander-in-chief or emperor. After winning a battle, the victorious general would be given this title as a salute from his soldiers. From the time of Julius Caesar, this title was taken as part of the long line of distinctions the emperors would assume. Often a number would appear after the title. This refered to the number of battles the emperor was credited with winning.
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/temetfutue/glossary/glossaryI.htm

# "triumphant general"; title given by soldiers to a triumphant general. The title was granted more often in the later Republic. Octavian later adopted the title as his praenomen. As such, it was the root of our work "emperor".
http://www.personal.kent.edu/~bkharvey/roman/terms/termse-i....

# Latin for "commander." A title given to Augustus indicating that he was now commander in chief of the armed forces, so to speak. The English word "emperor" comes from this.
http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~frankwu/lac61vocab.html

# The Latin word imperator was a title originally roughly equivalent to commander during the period of the Roman Republic. It later went on to become a part of the titulature of the Roman emperors and to enter European political theory as a synonym for emperor. Unlike emperor, the word is pronounced with stress on the third syllable.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperator


kironne
Chile
Local time: 20:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bourth (X): Were the attitude deemed worthy, yes ...
15 mins
  -> Digne de vous...
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