Blessures involontaires avec incapacité

English translation: Unintentional injury causing disability [not exceeding 3 months]

06:45 Sep 18, 2019
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Code de la route
French term or phrase: Blessures involontaires avec incapacité
Bonjour,
Il s'agit d'un délit de route dont la phrase entière est comme suit :
"Blessures involontaires avec incapacité n’excédant pas trois mois par conducteur de véhicule terrestre à moteur et violation manifestement délibérée d'une obligation de sécurité ou de prudence imposée par la loi ou le règlement."

Merci beaucoup d'avance pour votre aide
Lucia28
France
Local time: 23:52
English translation:Unintentional injury causing disability [not exceeding 3 months]
Explanation:
When a driver injures someone (or kills them) it's typically described as either intentional (a.k.a. with intent) or unintentional (a.k.a. without intent). In your turn of phrase it would be "unintentional"; the alternative terms are usually followed by a verb ("without intent to cause injury").

The terms "willful" and "willfulness" are more in the realm of business torts like patent or copyright infringement, rather than vehicular crimes/misdemeanors/citations.
Selected response from:

Eliza Hall
United States
Local time: 17:52
Grading comment
Thanks !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2Unintentional injury causing disability [not exceeding 3 months]
Eliza Hall
3 +1Unintentional, disabling injuries (UK/non-motoring) Wounding without intent to disable
Adrian MM.
3 +1Non-willful injuries causing incapacity/disability
Chakib Roula


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Non-willful injuries causing incapacity/disability


Explanation:
Suggestion

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Note added at 21 mins (2019-09-18 07:07:06 GMT)
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Je vous en prie.

Chakib Roula
Algeria
Local time: 22:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Or accidental.
16 mins
  -> Thank you Philgoddard.Your backing is pretty meaningful to me.

neutral  writeaway: any refs?
2 hrs

neutral  B D Finch: That would probably be OK for EN-US, but not for EN-UK, where we wouldn't use the term "wilful" even with the British spelling..
6 hrs

neutral  Eliza Hall: It gets the meaning across correctly, but "willful/wilful" isn't generally used for vehicular crime or indeed any crime. We say intentional/unintentional instead.
10 hrs
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Unintentional, disabling injuries (UK/non-motoring) Wounding without intent to disable


Explanation:
Blessures involontaires: 'unintentional injuries' (Bridge).

Asker doesn't specify any target-readership.

GBH/grievous boldily harm in the UK includes, albeit tempoarily, disabling harm

Example sentence(s):
  • UK: The following injuries are classified as GBH: An injury resulting in permanent disability, loss of sensory function or visible disfigurement

    Reference: http://www.lawtonslaw.co.uk/resources/what-does-it-mean-to-b...
Adrian MM.
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 66

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: Your first suggestion doesn't fit with "n'excédant pas trois mois", and your second implies assault, which this is not.
6 mins
  -> unintentional injuries with disability not exceeding three months (not part of the question) and wounding prefaced with non-motoring.

agree  Ph_B: "unintentional injuries resulting in disability (not exceeding...)"
4 hrs
  -> Yes, in context. In the UK, the hierarchical ranking of violent offences goes ABH/actual bodily harm, GBH/grievous bodily harm, wounding with intent (at least breaking of the skin or dislodging of the retina), (homicide) manslaughter & murder-

agree  B D Finch: I thought ABH and GBH were results of intentional violence, rather than accident or negligence?
5 hrs
  -> You are right though a motor vehicle can be used as a 'weapon' to cause GBH or wounding, but I don't actually use either term in this 'reckless or dangerous driving' context.

disagree  Eliza Hall: #1 doesn't work here (see PhilGoddard) and #2 is wrong because it implies there was intent to cause injury, just not an intent to disable. Wrong: the blessures, not just the incapacité, were involontaires. PS: I'm with Daryo on this.
10 hrs
  -> 1. the disabling is a separate idea from involuntary and 2. Again, the second alternative is prefaced as non-motoring and is for the benefit of those unfamiliar with English criminal law terms.

neutral  Daryo: "Wounding without intent to disable" sounds like a deliberate attack, albeit with a limited aim (we'll trash you, but not too much ...), while this ST is clearly about a road accident (a real one, not an attack camouflaged as road accident)
10 hrs
  -> Again, the second alternative is prefaced as non-motoring and is an underused translation within the compass of 'blessures' for the benefit of those unfamiliar with English criminal law terms.
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Unintentional injury causing disability [not exceeding 3 months]


Explanation:
When a driver injures someone (or kills them) it's typically described as either intentional (a.k.a. with intent) or unintentional (a.k.a. without intent). In your turn of phrase it would be "unintentional"; the alternative terms are usually followed by a verb ("without intent to cause injury").

The terms "willful" and "willfulness" are more in the realm of business torts like patent or copyright infringement, rather than vehicular crimes/misdemeanors/citations.

Eliza Hall
United States
Local time: 17:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 66
Grading comment
Thanks !

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daryo
7 mins

neutral  Adrian MM.: You have basically taken - and reworded - a combination of Chakib's and my answers, whilst making the injuries singular when there is clearly more than one.
4 hrs
  -> You are so hilarious, Adrian. I'm not sure how many times I'm going to have to remind you that all correct translations resemble each other, and "rewording" (for style, register etc.) is the key to good translation. PS: See discussion re "blessures."

agree  Michael Confais
6 days
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