captation parasitaire

English translation: BrE: diversion of trade / attracting of custom / by passing-off; US Am. misappropriation of clients > goodwill

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:captation parasitaire
English translation:BrE: diversion of trade / attracting of custom / by passing-off; US Am. misappropriation of clients > goodwill
Entered by: Adrian MM.

13:07 Jul 20, 2020
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Patents, Trademarks, Copyright
French term or phrase: captation parasitaire
Court judgment about unfair and parasitic competition, and trademark infringement.

"La concurrence déloyale comme le parasitisme présentent la caractéristique commune d'être appréciés à l'aune du principe de la liberté du commerce qui implique qu'un produit qui ne fait pas ou ne fait plus l'objet de droits de propriété intellectuelle, puisse être librement reproduit, sous certaines conditions tenant à l'absence de faute par la création d'un risque de confusion dans l'esprit de la clientèle sur l'origine du produit ou par l'existence d'une captation parasitaire, circonstances attentatoires à l'exercice paisible et loyal du commerce."

The word captation occurs one more time in the document:

"Si comme le relèvent les défenderesses, la société XXX met elle-même en avant sa réussite et la hausse de son chiffre d'affaires sur les années 2016 et 2017, il ne peut en être déduit l'absence de toute captation de clientèle, sur un marché du conseil en forte croissance."

The idea seems to be "capturing" clientele due to the wrongful acts. But is "capture" the right English word to use in this context? If it is "capturing" or "capture", do we have to be explicit about what is being captured: "parasitic capturing of clientele"?
Mpoma
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:32
a diversion of trade by passing-off
Explanation:
A lower confidence level than the earlier questions. Parasitic is indeed used for imitation but the picture that comes to my mind is hawkers outside well-known dept. stores in London's West End or 'parasites' who try to divert customers away with counterfeit products from countries that shall remain nameless.

Otherwise, if Alzheimers's memory serves me right, Heil v. Hedges 1951 is the well-known English product liability case in comm. law - and which my law-school peers found hilarious - in which a butcher got sued, unsuccessfully, for a parasitic worm found in an under-cooked pork chop.

Obiter: 'unlawful interference with contract' is a related English tort caused e.g. by catering workers striking 40 years ago outside a famous restaurant in Covent Garden from which they had been recently sacked and warning off passers-by.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 heures (2020-07-20 15:39:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To anticipate predictable US-Am. and CanE objections, passing-off in the UK does indeed double as 'palming off' and 'misappropriation' - not only of Yours Truly's answers.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 heures (2020-07-20 18:13:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Passing-off as a 'widely misunderstood' tort is a 'broad /Anglo-Irish / church' and IMO can be used for consultancy services - though I fear a Transatlantic palming-off or mis-appropriation 'backlash' when our US and Can. colleagues wake up in a different time zone.
Selected response from:

Adrian MM.
United Kingdom
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4parasitic exploitation
Francois Boye
3 +1a diversion of trade by passing-off
Adrian MM.
4 -1parasitic gain in business/customers
philgoddard
3misappropriation of customers; misappropriation of clients
TechLawDC
Summary of reference entries provided
Concurrence déloyale
Daryo

Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
parasitic gain in business/customers


Explanation:
I think you have to preserve the "parasitic" idea, because it's important.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2020-07-20 15:02:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or "parasitic customer/business gain" might be better.

philgoddard
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23
Notes to answerer
Asker: I agree that "parasitic" must be included and that it's widely used. Sceptics just have to google "parasitic business practices" - note UK spelling, proving that this isn't a "mere" Americanism.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Francois Boye: what does it mean in business or economics?//Read my attachment.
9 mins
  -> I don't understand your question.

disagree  AllegroTrans: Using "parasitic" in English is really a no-no, I've never see it used in this context, there are other words to express the notion
1 hr
  -> It's a widely used term. Some of the examples here are from IATE, and from EU bodies: http://glosbe.com/en/en/parasitic competition

neutral  Daryo: yes for "parasitic" but not the rest.
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
une captation parasitaire
a diversion of trade by passing-off


Explanation:
A lower confidence level than the earlier questions. Parasitic is indeed used for imitation but the picture that comes to my mind is hawkers outside well-known dept. stores in London's West End or 'parasites' who try to divert customers away with counterfeit products from countries that shall remain nameless.

Otherwise, if Alzheimers's memory serves me right, Heil v. Hedges 1951 is the well-known English product liability case in comm. law - and which my law-school peers found hilarious - in which a butcher got sued, unsuccessfully, for a parasitic worm found in an under-cooked pork chop.

Obiter: 'unlawful interference with contract' is a related English tort caused e.g. by catering workers striking 40 years ago outside a famous restaurant in Covent Garden from which they had been recently sacked and warning off passers-by.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 heures (2020-07-20 15:39:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To anticipate predictable US-Am. and CanE objections, passing-off in the UK does indeed double as 'palming off' and 'misappropriation' - not only of Yours Truly's answers.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 heures (2020-07-20 18:13:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Passing-off as a 'widely misunderstood' tort is a 'broad /Anglo-Irish / church' and IMO can be used for consultancy services - though I fear a Transatlantic palming-off or mis-appropriation 'backlash' when our US and Can. colleagues wake up in a different time zone.

Example sentence(s):
  • In Montgomery v Thompson (1891), the "Stone Ales" / passing-off/ case: Mr Thompson suffered damage as a result: loss of profit, caused by *diversion of trade*

    Reference: http://hallellis.co.uk/passing-off-claims/
Adrian MM.
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks
Notes to answerer
Asker: Haha. Informative and amusing as ever. Shall we call you Rumpole (formerly) of the Bailey? Re the actual translation: can we really use "passing off" in a context of corporate providers of consultancy services (see text: "marché du conseil")?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AllegroTrans: Well this certainly ties in with 'risk of confusion'
1 hr
  -> Thanks, AT.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
misappropriation of customers; misappropriation of clients


Explanation:
This appears to be a special type of unfair competition which is treated separately under the law.
Ref.:
http://www.lawyers-picovschi.com/article-misappropriation-of...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2020-07-20 20:16:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alternative: misappropriation of customers by deception as to the provenance of a product or service.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2020-07-21 08:49:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would add: Alternative 2: misappropriation of customers by deception as to the provenance of a product or service, but not directly prosecutable under Trademark Law.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2020-07-21 08:51:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(In other words, I have restated "usurpation de notoriété" in English.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2020-07-21 08:56:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alternative 3: misappropriation of the identity or reputation of a competitor toward customers or clients (or potential customers or clients), other than such misappropriation directly prosecutable under Trademark Law.

TechLawDC
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Daryo: that would imply that "clients" are in some way in the "ownership" of their current suppliers - wrong assumption: no one "owns" their clients, whatever all sort of middlemen in all sort of businesses like to presume.
1 hr
  -> I used "clients" as a synonym for "customers" as per my Trademark Law textbook. The point is that "misappropriation" as used here is violation of attribution rights which violation is not directly prosecutable under Trademark Law.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
parasitic exploitation


Explanation:
https://www.mondaq.com/brazil/trade-regulation-practices/414...

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 19:32
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


10 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Concurrence déloyale

Reference information:
le parasitisme

Une entreprise peut subir un trouble commercial important lorsqu’un concurrent adopte à son égard un comportement parasitaire en tentant de s’approprier sans bourse délier son savoir-faire, son travail intellectuel et ses investissements. Ainsi, est par exemple sanctionnée:

l’utilisation de l’argumentaire commercial ou promotionnel d’une entreprise concurrente
la reprise du code couleur constituant l’identité d’un concurrent
l’imitation d’un produit concurrent qui n’est pas protégé par un droit de propriété intellectuelle (droit d’auteur, droit des marques, brevet)

Un tel comportement est sanctionné même lorsque les divers intervenants ne sont pas concurrents, et sans qu’il soit forcément nécessaire de démontrer un risque de confusion entre ces derniers.

Il s’agit alors d’une usurpation de notoriété consistant à créer un rattachement fictif avec les produits ou la marque d’une entreprise afin de tirer profit de son image et de sa réputation en donnant l’apparence de produits ou services connexes ou dérivés.

[...
le dénigrement

Les tribunaux sanctionnent le fait de jeter le discrédit sur un concurrent, nommé ou aisément identifiable, en répandant à son propos, ou au sujet de ses produits ou services, des informations malveillantes.

la désorganisation

La désorganisation déloyale d’une entreprise par un concurrent peut prendre diverses formes telles que l’incitation à la grève du personnel, la divulgation d’un savoir-faire ou encore, et c’est sa forme la plus fréquente, le débauchage de personnel.

le détournement de commandes

Le fait de détourner les commandes d’un concurrent est sanctionné au titre de la concurrence déloyale.

Le détournement de commandes peut prendre diverses formes, telles que l’incitation par un concurrent à la résiliation de commande en vue de les exécuter à son profit ou encore le report, par un salarié en préavis de départ, de commandes sur la société qu’il a créée;

...]

la captation de clientèle

S’il n’existe pas de droit privatif sur la clientèle permettant de sanctionner le simple démarchage de la clientèle d’un concurrent, un tel procédé est sanctionné dès lors qu’il est accompagné d’agissements déloyaux.

Tel est par exemple le cas lorsqu’une entreprise prospecte systématiquement tous les clients de son concurrent ou encore lorsqu’elle annonce de manière mensongère la cessation d’activité d’un concurrent.

https://chloe-fernstrom.fr/fr/domaines-dintervention/concurr...


Qu'est-ce qu'un détournement de clientèle ?

On peut considérer qu'un salarié détourne la clientèle de son employeur lorsqu'il démarche les clients de son employeur pour son propre compte ou pour le compte d'une autre entreprise. On parle également de captation de clientèle.

Le détournement de clientèle est une forme de concurrence déloyale.

Les juges considèrent que tel est le cas lorsque :

le salarié fait délibérément signer, à plusieurs reprises, à des clients de son employeur des ordres de remplacement au profit d'un cabinet concurrent dont il avait prévu de reprendre la direction peu après (Cass. soc., 30 septembre 2003, n° 01-45.066) ;
le collaborateur détourne délibérément des clients de son employeur au profit d'une société concurrente dont il est associé, à compter de la création de cette société et jusqu'à sa démission (Cass. soc., 9 avril 2008, n° 06-46.047).

Attention ! Lorsqu'un salarié quitte une entreprise afin d'en intégrer une autre, le déplacement de la clientèle de l'ancienne entreprise vers la nouvelle (y compris si elle est créée par le salarié concerné) ne constitue pas un acte de concurrence déloyale dès lors qu'aucun procédé déloyal n'a été utilisé (Cass. com., 8 janvier 1991, n° 89-11.367). Les clients sont en effet libres de choisir leurs prestataires et de s'adresser au commerçant ou à l'entreprise de leur choix. Il peut donc arriver qu'un client souhaite continuer sa relation avec le salarié qui s'occupait de son dossier, sans que ce dernier ne lui ai suggéré ou demandé.

Les juges estiment notamment que constitue un procédé déloyal le fait de :

dénigrer ou transmettre des informations inexactes ou mensongères ;
utiliser les signes distinctifs de l'entreprise en vue d'établir une confusion afin de capter sa clientèle ;
détourner et utiliser des listes ou fichiers de clientèle ;
détourner des commandes ;
prospecter systématique les clients de l'entreprise, etc.

Bon à savoir : un salarié, qui crée une entreprise exerçant une activité concurrente sans en avoir informé son employeur ni obtenu son accord, manque à son obligation de loyauté. Il peut faire l'objet d'un licenciement pour faute grave, peu importe que des actes de détournement de clientèle soient ou non établis (Cass. soc., 30 novembre 2017, n° 16-14.541).

https://contrat-de-travail.ooreka.fr/astuce/voir/703595/deto...

https://www.editions-tissot.fr/actualite/droit-du-travail/de...

https://www.anetia.fr/clause-de-non-sollicitation-valable-ma...

Daryo
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  AllegroTrans: Well this shows that the term in French law encompasses a number of civil wrongs to which we give separate names in English
1 day 14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search