Il propose des objets pas chers, des collecteurs, des bonnes affaires.

English translation: offer

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:proposer
English translation:offer
Entered by: cc in nyc

15:09 Feb 29, 2012
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics / grammar, lexicon
French term or phrase: Il propose des objets pas chers, des collecteurs, des bonnes affaires.
I need to clarify a subtle point here: can one use the verb "propose" followed by a direct object just as it is in French, or does that verb concern mainly actions suggested or abstract ideas.
Are these correct?
1) He proposes a brand new car for sale.
2) He proposed a solution to their problem.
3) He proposed coming over for a drink.

Thank you for your help !!
Romain Gril
Local time: 11:58
offer
Explanation:
He offers inexpensive items.

Please pose additional questions if you need help with the other terms.

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Note added at 5 mins (2012-02-29 15:15:11 GMT)
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Also – a friendly suggestion – please consider providing more context... "Proposer" in French has many meanings in English and the context (not just the sentence) matters a lot.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days21 hrs (2012-03-03 13:09:17 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

You're welcome!
Selected response from:

cc in nyc
Local time: 05:58
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3offer
cc in nyc
4He offers inexpensive items, collectors' items, and great bargains
Gabrielle Leyden
4He offers inexpensive and collectors items, nice stuff.
SC Nova
4to offer
Tony M


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
proposer
to offer


Explanation:
I'd just like to expand on the answer given by CC (to whom all credit is due)

Romain, proposer > propose is often a bit of a 'faux ami', so needs handling with care in EN.

A rule of thumb I use is that EN to propose has more the meaning of FR 'faire une proposition' — so if that wouldn't fit in your FR text, then 'to propose' possibly won't be right in the EN text either.

I think your analysis is about right: in EN, propose can be used with ideas and with verbs, with a general sense of 'suggest'; but isn't usually the right choice when the sense is 'offer', as in so many commercial situations, for example.



Tony M
France
Local time: 11:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, all of your answers are very helpful (and do confirm what I thought, but after too much translating of nasty marketing material I get lost...). I'll give credit to CC, but your addedum is great, thanks!!

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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Il propose des objets pas cher, des collectors, des bonnes affaires.
He offers inexpensive and collectors items, nice stuff.


Explanation:
2 and 3 are good. For number one you can say OFFERED or SUGGESTED and eliminate the end of the sentence "for sale" because offering or suggesting a "brand new car" implies that it is for sale or purchase.

It all depends on the formality of the language here. If it is literature, then "stuff" is good. If it is more formal, you may replace "stuff" with "things".

SC Nova
Local time: 05:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Georgie Scott: I'm sorry, but the sentence you have provided here seems unnatural to me. If this is a list then "and" should come before "nice stuff", or perhaps a semi colon could be used. "Stuff" for me is so general I would try to only use it amongst friends.
15 mins
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Il propose des objets pas cher, des collectors, des bonnes affaires.
He offers inexpensive items, collectors' items, and great bargains


Explanation:
Grammatically, you can propose a solution, propose to do something, propose doing something, etc. see OED on "to propose" = to put forward, to exhibit or display. But semantically, "to offer" would be used in your first sentence and your "question" context.

I think your question may be booted out of this section and into some other "discussion section."

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Note added at 18 mins (2012-02-29 15:27:43 GMT)
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I'm in the same boat - have no idea where such questions are to be posted!

Gabrielle Leyden
Belgium
Local time: 11:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, thank you so very much. I get easily confused on these forums. I need to look for the best place for this type of questions. Thank you!!!

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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
proposer
offer


Explanation:
He offers inexpensive items.

Please pose additional questions if you need help with the other terms.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2012-02-29 15:15:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also – a friendly suggestion – please consider providing more context... "Proposer" in French has many meanings in English and the context (not just the sentence) matters a lot.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days21 hrs (2012-03-03 13:09:17 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

You're welcome!

cc in nyc
Local time: 05:58
Native speaker of: English
Grading comment
Thank you!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a lot. Problem is, in marketing you get to translate very short, snappy sentences like this, whose authors expect to be totally clear.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard
41 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Laurette Tassin
50 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Letredenoblesse
4 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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