tourbillons et turbulences

English translation: vortices and turbulences (note: swirls also found, possibly some technical difference?)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tourbillons et turbulences [laryngeal air movements in voice production]
English translation:vortices and turbulences (note: swirls also found, possibly some technical difference?)
Entered by: Tony M

08:06 Apr 9, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Linguistics
French term or phrase: tourbillons et turbulences
nous avons mis en évidence des phénomènes de tourbillons et de turbulences encore mal connus à la sortie du larynx
suezen
Local time: 10:12
vortices and turbulences
Explanation:
I assume this is talking about air movements associated with voice and the generation of speech.

I don't have specialist knowledge here, but as far as I am aware, the standard terms apply

cf GDT

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Note added at 51 mins (2005-04-09 08:58:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t like playing the Google game, but do just note that \'vortices\' gets almost twice as many (relevant) hits as \'swirls\' in connection with larynx; in one instance, a differentiaion is even made between a swirl and a vortex, so that might be something to look into further...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 53 mins (2005-04-09 08:59:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t like playing the Google game, but do just note that \'vortices\' gets almost twice as many (relevant) hits as \'swirls\' in connection with larynx; in one instance, a differentiaion is even made between a swirl and a vortex, so that might be something to look into further...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 57 mins (2005-04-09 09:04:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that in English turbulence is more usually used in the singular, even to translate the French plural; however, in this particular context, I think the plural in English is not only accpetable, but probably even essential. I think they are not talking about \'turbulence in general\', but rather about specific instances of turbulence...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 23 mins (2005-04-09 09:30:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, in terms of aerodynamics, there is indeed a difference between turbulence and vortices / swirling, so the French are very justified in differentiating between them! I know from my work with (pipe) organs how important all this is in the production of sound.

What I am less clear about is exactly WHAT distinction might be made between \'swirl\' and \'vortex\' --- unless indeed one use of \'or\' in one of the Google references I found merely sought to express the two terms as equivalent alternatives.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:12
Grading comment
Many, many thanks to both of you. It was a difficult decision to make and I would have loved to give you half each but we can't do that. Perhaps it would be an improvement to make to the system!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1vortices and turbulences
Tony M
4 +1swirls and turbulence
Dr Sue Levy (X)


  

Answers


48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
swirls and turbulence


Explanation:
First thing that popped into my head, and on googling, indeed, they popped up again :-)

Type title here. - [ Traduire cette page ]
... These grooves create turbulence that swirls the air against the mucous ...
It extends between the internal nares and the entrances to the larynx and ...
members.tripod.com/~rmoskowitz/respiratory.html - 17k - En cache - Pages similaires

SAS_Physiology - [ Traduire cette page ]
... Cause turbulence, whirls and swirls in the air flow. ... Opening into the larynx.
Vocal cords surround the rim of the glottis. Eppiglottis ...
www.starsandseas.com/SAS Physiology/ Respiration/physlresp.htm - 20k - En cache - Pages similaires

Ling 001 Phonetics - [ Traduire cette page ]
... Strikingly, the lowering of the larynx, which permits a greater variety of
... The result is turbulence, a complex pattern of swirls and eddies at a ...
www.ling.upenn.edu/courses/ Spring_2001/ling001/phonetics.html - 31k - En cache - Pages similaires

Ling 001 Lecture 03a - [ Traduire cette page ]
... Strikingly, the evolutionary lowering of the larynx, which permits a ...
The result is turbulence, a complex pattern of swirls and eddies at a wide ...
www.ling.upenn.edu/courses/Spring_2003/ling001/03a.html - 53k - En cache - Pages similaires

[PDF] Physiology 601/ 801 March 23, 2004 RESISTIVE PROPERTIES OF THE ...
Format de fichier: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Version HTML
... streamlines with resultant eddies and swirls. TURBULENT FLOW ... turbulence in
flow through the nose, the pharynx, and the larynx. ...
human.physiol.arizona.edu/ SCHED/Respiration/Morgan42/Morgan.L42.pdf


Dr Sue Levy (X)
Local time: 10:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I was surprised to see from these and other refs. that this term is indeed used (I thought it sounded too informal) --- but just watch out for that caveat, mentioned in my own answer... /// Please see note added to my answer...
6 mins
  -> Yes - in fact, in English, turbulence seems to be a general term for the air flow patterns. The French apparently distinguish between tourbillons and turbulences.
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48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
vortices and turbulences


Explanation:
I assume this is talking about air movements associated with voice and the generation of speech.

I don't have specialist knowledge here, but as far as I am aware, the standard terms apply

cf GDT

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 51 mins (2005-04-09 08:58:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t like playing the Google game, but do just note that \'vortices\' gets almost twice as many (relevant) hits as \'swirls\' in connection with larynx; in one instance, a differentiaion is even made between a swirl and a vortex, so that might be something to look into further...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 53 mins (2005-04-09 08:59:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t like playing the Google game, but do just note that \'vortices\' gets almost twice as many (relevant) hits as \'swirls\' in connection with larynx; in one instance, a differentiaion is even made between a swirl and a vortex, so that might be something to look into further...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 57 mins (2005-04-09 09:04:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that in English turbulence is more usually used in the singular, even to translate the French plural; however, in this particular context, I think the plural in English is not only accpetable, but probably even essential. I think they are not talking about \'turbulence in general\', but rather about specific instances of turbulence...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 23 mins (2005-04-09 09:30:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, in terms of aerodynamics, there is indeed a difference between turbulence and vortices / swirling, so the French are very justified in differentiating between them! I know from my work with (pipe) organs how important all this is in the production of sound.

What I am less clear about is exactly WHAT distinction might be made between \'swirl\' and \'vortex\' --- unless indeed one use of \'or\' in one of the Google references I found merely sought to express the two terms as equivalent alternatives.

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23
Grading comment
Many, many thanks to both of you. It was a difficult decision to make and I would have loved to give you half each but we can't do that. Perhaps it would be an improvement to make to the system!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr Sue Levy (X): and when you're lost for words, they can be found swirling in the vortex :-)
3 mins
  -> Thanks, Sue! I'm not entirely sure that's where MY words come from ;-))) "coagulating in the void", perhaps!
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