fonds de cupules

English translation: my thoughts

10:08 Jul 29, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Anatomy
French term or phrase: fonds de cupules
Specific phrase: "Rotation entre les condyles distaux et les fonds de cupules."
This is in medical software to measure spinal and lower limb alignment. I know the condyles distaux are on the bottom of the femur, and since the text talks about rotation, I believe the fonds de cupules is [are] the intercondylar fossa--but I definitely need feedback!
Mary McArthur
Local time: 11:13
English translation:my thoughts
Explanation:
This is a hard one - but I wonder if it isn't referring to the recesses formed by the menisci on the tibial plateau - in other words the concave parts of the articular surface of the proximal tibia.

This article makes me think it may well be:
http://infoscience.epfl.ch/getfile.py?recid=88205&mode=best

The intercondylar fossa is another possibility - although as I have mentioned above, this would have to be a fixed point/axis between the femoral condyles.

Also, I would not use "bottom" but rather "base" or "floor" for a concave upwards structure, and "apex" or "roof" for one that is concave down when the body is upright. If you think it means one particular point, perhaps "deepest/lowest point".

I would avoid "cup" which is not a name given to any anatomical structure I know of in the lower limb and is almost exclusively used in reference to a prosthetic component.
Selected response from:

Dr Sue Levy (X)
Local time: 20:13
Grading comment
Thank you so much on all your thoughts on this question. Never got an answer back from the client (a software publisher), but I suspect you are correct in thinking this is a point on the tibia, and not on the femur.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5cup bottoms
:::::::::: (X)
3my thoughts
Dr Sue Levy (X)


Discussion entries: 13





  

Answers


35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
cup bottoms


Explanation:
I'm (was) good at anatomy

:::::::::: (X)
Iraq
Local time: 20:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 296
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21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
my thoughts


Explanation:
This is a hard one - but I wonder if it isn't referring to the recesses formed by the menisci on the tibial plateau - in other words the concave parts of the articular surface of the proximal tibia.

This article makes me think it may well be:
http://infoscience.epfl.ch/getfile.py?recid=88205&mode=best

The intercondylar fossa is another possibility - although as I have mentioned above, this would have to be a fixed point/axis between the femoral condyles.

Also, I would not use "bottom" but rather "base" or "floor" for a concave upwards structure, and "apex" or "roof" for one that is concave down when the body is upright. If you think it means one particular point, perhaps "deepest/lowest point".

I would avoid "cup" which is not a name given to any anatomical structure I know of in the lower limb and is almost exclusively used in reference to a prosthetic component.

Dr Sue Levy (X)
Local time: 20:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1099
Grading comment
Thank you so much on all your thoughts on this question. Never got an answer back from the client (a software publisher), but I suspect you are correct in thinking this is a point on the tibia, and not on the femur.
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