Cher confrère

English translation: dear colleague

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Cher confrère
English translation:dear colleague
Entered by: Camilla Dingwall

09:37 Nov 19, 2018
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
French term or phrase: Cher confrère
A French speaking doctor writing to another doctor uses the phrase: "Cher confère". Would that translate to "Dear learned friend" ? Any other suggestions here?

Thanks in advance !
Camilla Dingwall
Spain
Local time: 22:49
dear colleague
Explanation:
usual way to address someone who is a co-professional
Selected response from:

David Connor
Australia
Local time: 07:49
Grading comment
Yes it is "Dear Colleague" when doctors writing to each other whether they know each other or not. Thank you also to all of you commenting.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +11dear colleague
David Connor
4 +2Dear Doctor X
Drmanu49


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
dear colleague


Explanation:
usual way to address someone who is a co-professional

David Connor
Australia
Local time: 07:49
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Yes it is "Dear Colleague" when doctors writing to each other whether they know each other or not. Thank you also to all of you commenting.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Evelyne Trolley de Prévaux
40 mins

agree  James A. Walsh
42 mins

neutral  Jennifer White: Not at all sure about this. "Dear Colleague " letters are something else. In any case, upper case should be used for D and C. as per Dear Sir.
45 mins

agree  Tony M: This is what I've often seen on such letters in the UK — especially when your GP, say, is referring you to a specialist service, but doesn't know which actual doctor you will be seeing...
1 hr

neutral  Drmanu49: not specific enough.
1 hr

agree  B D Finch: Dear Colleague
1 hr

agree  katsy
2 hrs

agree  Sue Davis
4 hrs

agree  Robert Miki: Yes, "Dear Colleague". The context is obvious: a doctor writing to another doctor.
5 hrs

agree  Otha Nash: Yes, in a conversation between two professionals, "Dear Colleague" is usual and appropriate.
8 hrs

agree  Louise Normandin
12 hrs

agree  Graham Lees
16 hrs

agree  Katarina Peters
6 days
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Dear Doctor X


Explanation:
is the usual term.

Drmanu49
France
Local time: 22:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4728

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jennifer White
4 mins
  -> Thank you.

neutral  Tony M: We would rarely write 'Doctor' out in full in EN, and this can't be used in many instances because the (e;g.) referring doctor may not know which actual doctor you are going to see (typicallly, here in France, where you can choose yourself)
26 mins
  -> Whether in full or not it is much more common in our exchanges than colleague which is less specific.

neutral  B D Finch: I suppose you wrote it in full because, unfortunately, Dr X could be read as the plural of "dreck".
1 hr
  ->  Usually abbreviated but not always depending on how formal the letter is.

agree  philgoddard: Assuming the doctor knows who he or she is writing to, and it's not just "to whom it may concern", then yes, I believe this is the correct answer. But Tony is right that it's usually abbreviated.
4 hrs
  -> Thank you Phil. I agreed with that. Usually but not always depending on how formal the letter is.
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