viande surgonflée

English translation: anabolic meat

11:22 Dec 30, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Science - Nutrition
French term or phrase: viande surgonflée
In a review of the French book "Vive la Malbouffe" - appearing on website below:
http://www.doctissimo.fr/html/nutrition/dossiers/sante-assie...

In first paragraph of section entitled " des conséquences critiquables...", appears the sentence " l'avenir est-il vraiment aux légumes qui se conservent très longtemps mais avec beaucoup moins de goût, aux viandes surgonflées, aux fruits irradiés etc..."

I am not familiar with the term and was wondering if anyone out there is familiar with this phrase? at first I was tempted to translate it with "overinflated meats", but I am not sure it is the term used in English! The translation is meant for an audience who knows the subject matter (Malbouffe etc) but not French. I have not yet found a text in English with a similar phrase...
Any ideas would be welcome!
Thanks!
juleslarana
English translation:anabolic meat
Explanation:
anabolic steroids > used in bodybuilding

ref. practice in the US of injecting cattle with hormones

http://www.preventcancer.com/consumers/general/hormones_meat...

or

bodybuilt meat

pumped-up meat

meat that has been pumping iron

bulky hormone-assisted/pumped meat

That's the idea, I think.

Only the likes of cooked ham and bacon are filled with water.

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Note added at 5 hrs (2011-12-30 17:16:28 GMT)
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(artificial) hormone-laden pumped-up meat

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Note added at 22 hrs (2011-12-31 10:02:09 GMT)
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Come to think of it, "pumped-up" leaves it ambivalent as to why the meat is bulky, while hinting that it is due to hormones (which was perhaps the intention of the original).
Selected response from:

Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 11:49
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4anabolic meat
Conor McAuley
4 +1water-injected meat
B D Finch
3 +2boosted meat, artificially enhanced meat...
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4overprocessed meat
cc in nyc


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
water-injected meat


Explanation:
Though, as Tony says, this could also be about the use of hormones and factory farming, I find that less likely.

www.managementtoday.co.uk/.../BOOKS-Anyone-globalibation/?....
"... seeing no justification for GM feed, growth hormones, water-injected meat or the factory farming that goes into malbouffe (junk food). ..."

uk.news.yahoo.com/political-motives-seen-wal-marts-china-trouble-...
"In recent years, the country has been rocked by a series of food scandals, ... and also an effort to balance some of the bad press Chinese ... of the city's pork market and forced buyers to purchase water-injected meat. ..."




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Note added at 1 hr (2011-12-30 12:29:26 GMT)
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It is the water-injection process that makes the meat swell so that a considerable amount of the weight the customer is paying for is water. Hormone boosting results in the animals producing actual meat, albeit with animal welfare and quality issues that put many people off wanting to buy it. Give me tofu, soya protein and beansprouts please.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 11:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your help... although I cannot seem to get hold of the management today document, I think you are right! Although Nikki and Tony I take your points as well! The translation is not however for le grand public, but for researchers... so I think I will go for water-injected! Merci beaucoup!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hal D'Arpini
1 hr
  -> Thanks Hal

neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Not sure - original article in ordinary FR but the target audience is 'grand public' even if EN version for scientists. We have no ref to water nor to GH here so best to stay gen. Common to use "gonflé" for hormones./Exactly, hi hi! Why H20? We disagree;-
1 hr
  -> I wasn't aware of your last point. In many contexts you would be right about sticking with something non-specific. However, this is polemic and not a report of a scientific study, so the rules are different.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
overprocessed meat


Explanation:
IMO, in the context of the excessive processing indicated in the context of " légumes qui se conservent très longtemps mais avec beaucoup moins de goût, aux viandes surgonflées, aux fruits irradiés, "pesticidés" ou encore aux plats préparés trop riches en calories, en mauvaises graisses, en sel ou en sucre."

cc in nyc
Local time: 05:49
Native speaker of: English
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
anabolic meat


Explanation:
anabolic steroids > used in bodybuilding

ref. practice in the US of injecting cattle with hormones

http://www.preventcancer.com/consumers/general/hormones_meat...

or

bodybuilt meat

pumped-up meat

meat that has been pumping iron

bulky hormone-assisted/pumped meat

That's the idea, I think.

Only the likes of cooked ham and bacon are filled with water.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2011-12-30 17:16:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(artificial) hormone-laden pumped-up meat

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2011-12-31 10:02:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Come to think of it, "pumped-up" leaves it ambivalent as to why the meat is bulky, while hinting that it is due to hormones (which was perhaps the intention of the original).

Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 11:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks! I like pumped-up meat too... I agree also with you on the ref to water-injected, having read a few more articles since posting my question! Merci buckets!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SJLD: "pumped-up meat" sounds like a good compromise to me
2 hrs
  -> Thanks SJLD!

agree  Yolanda Broad: I like pumped-up meat too.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Yolanda! Many, many thanks also for all your entries in the KudoZ glossaries (many of them legal), which I steal on a regular basis!

agree  ormiston: yes to pumped-up meat
1 day 17 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Useful! Sufficiently colloquial whilst the hint at hormones, as mentioned. Used in the UK for bacon/water so sufficiently catch-all & grand public : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2018299/EU-wants-lab...
1 day 23 hrs
  -> Thanks Nikki, interesting link
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53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
boosted meat, artificially enhanced meat...


Explanation:
... or anything long those lines.

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Note added at 1 hr (2011-12-30 12:50:56 GMT)
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What is a TT audience?
The more specific the better, except that it looks to me that the French is not being specific at all at this particular point.

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Note added at 1 hr (2011-12-30 12:52:27 GMT)
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It may be for researchers but you can only translate what is written. If it actually means, water-injected and the client can confirm, then of course it would be better to say so. If there is no way of knowing, then it would be wrong to say so!

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Note added at 1 hr (2011-12-30 12:53:46 GMT)
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The final audiance being scientific, the source is never the less "grand public". If you 'inflate' the original, without evidence to do so (which you may of course get in the end!), then you are on shaky ground IMO.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2011-12-30 13:36:34 GMT)
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The reveiw on the Doctissimo site is by a certain Dr Rivière but the book is written by journalists. Nothing against journalists and who knows, they may be scientists. The fact remains that the original is grand public and although it might be a good idea to use your "Sunday best" English, but upgrading to make the article say something it does not is well dodgy!

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Note added at 8 days (2012-01-08 10:34:19 GMT)
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I do like "pumped up" though as it is very "parlant" and covers both.

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Note added at 8 days (2012-01-08 10:36:44 GMT)
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Also with a number of friends who are doctors and being surrounded by scientists every day, when not speaking or writing in formal contexts, the correct scientific terms cab be and are used but it does not rule out the use of "surgonflé" in more informal contexts, written or spoken.

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Nikki... I was thinking along the lines of enhanced meat... but I also have read now quite a lot about meat being made heavier with water... so I wonder if in a more scientific way (as this is the TT audience) I should go with water-injected.. Thanks for your contribution though! Most helpful!

Asker: HI Nikki (again!)... After having read all the answers suggested, and other texts, I see your point about the water-inflated etc... and the need to stick to something maybe less-scientific and more "grand public"... so I have decided to go for something along the lines of enhanced or boosted, as after "mûre réflection" I think it fits better with the context as well. Hopefully, I will thus avoid to be "dodgy"! Merci pour tes conseils!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marlena Dobosz
7 hrs

agree  Kelly S
4 days
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