J'ai pris la voiture au garage and "Bison Fute"

English translation: Yes there is, see below

13:23 Aug 25, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: J'ai pris la voiture au garage and "Bison Fute"
I would like to know if there is any difference in meaning between "J'ai pris la voiture au garage" and "J'ai emmene la voiture au garage."
What does "Bison Fute" mean in France? It is used during periods of heavy traffic? Does it have to do with "les periodes des chasse-croises"?
nicolas
English translation:Yes there is, see below
Explanation:
J'ai pris la voiture au garage = I took the car from the garage (could be either the garage at home where you put it every night - or on high days and holidays, if you're like me...) or the garage where you left it to be repaired. The latter meaning being commonly used, although erroneous as one should say "chez le garagiste" if you mean to have it repaired and not "au garage".

J'ai emmené la voiture au garage = means that you took it TO the garage. Same error as above, although the sense is unambiguous.

Whatever the place, prendre au = take from
emmener au = take to.

It's all in the prepositions.

As for the BISON FUTE (literal meaning is the canny bison),try the website www.bisonfute.com. This is a national organisation in France known for road travel information. France Info (a 24-hour radio news station braodcasts such info based on that received from the Bison Futé. Bad days of heavy traffic are referred to by the Bison Futé are "journées noires", then it's rouge, orange...

Tune in!

All the best and avoid the black days!
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:56
Grading comment
Thanks so much for your input. You answered my question exactly the way I wanted to be answered: short, concise and to the point. I can feel confident after reading your answer. I write and speak French fluently, but when I translate, I get easily confused with the nuances and subtleties of the language. Sometimes the most seemingly rudimentary questions are the most difficult to answer. Why? Because they only arise when you need to translate (interpret as well). Otherwise, they're never discussed. Again, Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
na"J'ai porté la voiture au garage" or "je suis allé porter la voiture au garage" (see below)
Louise Atfield
naJust to finish...
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naYes there is, see below
Nikki Scott-Despaigne


  

Answers


18 mins
Yes there is, see below


Explanation:
J'ai pris la voiture au garage = I took the car from the garage (could be either the garage at home where you put it every night - or on high days and holidays, if you're like me...) or the garage where you left it to be repaired. The latter meaning being commonly used, although erroneous as one should say "chez le garagiste" if you mean to have it repaired and not "au garage".

J'ai emmené la voiture au garage = means that you took it TO the garage. Same error as above, although the sense is unambiguous.

Whatever the place, prendre au = take from
emmener au = take to.

It's all in the prepositions.

As for the BISON FUTE (literal meaning is the canny bison),try the website www.bisonfute.com. This is a national organisation in France known for road travel information. France Info (a 24-hour radio news station braodcasts such info based on that received from the Bison Futé. Bad days of heavy traffic are referred to by the Bison Futé are "journées noires", then it's rouge, orange...

Tune in!

All the best and avoid the black days!


    Reference: http://www.bisonfute.com
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4549
Grading comment
Thanks so much for your input. You answered my question exactly the way I wanted to be answered: short, concise and to the point. I can feel confident after reading your answer. I write and speak French fluently, but when I translate, I get easily confused with the nuances and subtleties of the language. Sometimes the most seemingly rudimentary questions are the most difficult to answer. Why? Because they only arise when you need to translate (interpret as well). Otherwise, they're never discussed. Again, Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Heathcliff

Mary Lalevee
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins
Just to finish...


Explanation:
yes, it is to do with the "chassés croisés" (generally to-ings and fro-ings) but in the context of traffic, it means heavy two-way traffic, at its worst in France between 15/7 and 15/8.

Over and out.


    Le Robert & Collins
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4549

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Heathcliff
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs
"J'ai porté la voiture au garage" or "je suis allé porter la voiture au garage" (see below)


Explanation:
Throughout my French education, it was hammered in our heads that the word "amener" cannot be used in just any which way. Ammener means that you walk someone to some place. For instance "j'amene mon amie au cinema". My French dictionary confirms this as it states: " amener: mener (un être animé) auprès de quelqu'un ou à un endroit" Moreover it says: "amener suppose que l'accompagnateur quitte la personne a l'arrivée, à la difference de "emmener"." Therefore, if you want to speak proper French, you cannot "amener la voiture au garage".

We were also told that if it was a thing that you take somewhere, you use the word "apporter" rather than "amener". (Chaperon Rouge apporte un pot de confiture a sa mère grand.) But there is a problem here, because "apporter" implies that you take it in your hands or in your arms. You can hadly do that with a car!

On the other hand, you cannot "prendre la voiture au garage" either! Prendre means "to take" but in the sense of "to pick up", "to get", but not in the sense of "taking somewhere".

I suggest the expression: "J'ai porté la voiture au garage" or "Je suis allé(e) porter la voiture au garage", which would be proper French, and is the expression we use in a case like this.

"bison fûté" is a name for the national centre that gives road information:

"Les conseils de Bison-Fûté
Interrogé sur la façon dont il faut se préparer avant de prendre la route, M. Christian Machu, co-directeur du Centre national d'informations routières surnommé Bison-fûté, nous prodigue ses derniers conseils" (http://www.senior-planet.com/galeries/seniormalin/actualites... )

See also:

http://www.bison-fute.equipement.gouv.fr/

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Heathcliff
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