foutre

English translation: Replacement, not an addition

20:59 Jan 14, 2001
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: foutre
if put the verb "do" or "faire" in french before
the verb "foutre".....,
Tan
English translation:Replacement, not an addition
Explanation:
"foutre" is a slangy, slightly coarse replacement for "faire", so you wouldn't use it with "faire" but instead of it.
eg. 'qu'est-ce que tu fais?'='what are you doing?', but 'qu'est-ce que tu fous'='what the hell are you doing?'
Selected response from:

Matthew Folley
Local time: 04:30
Grading comment
pixie - thanks for the answer!

3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
na"go get f...ked" or "f...ck you"
Louise Atfield
na"get stuffed!"
JabTrad
naGet lost (sort of)
Ana.uk
naReplacement, not an addition
Matthew Folley


  

Answers


4 hrs
Replacement, not an addition


Explanation:
"foutre" is a slangy, slightly coarse replacement for "faire", so you wouldn't use it with "faire" but instead of it.
eg. 'qu'est-ce que tu fais?'='what are you doing?', but 'qu'est-ce que tu fous'='what the hell are you doing?'

Matthew Folley
Local time: 04:30
Grading comment
pixie - thanks for the answer!
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5 hrs
Get lost (sort of)


Explanation:
On the other hand, "va te faire foutre" is common but coarse slang, telling someone to "go forth and multiply" shall we say...

I'm trying to be as polite as possible!

Ana.uk
Local time: 04:30
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Evert DELOOF-SYS
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7 hrs
"get stuffed!"


Explanation:
The most likely use is in the phrase \"allez faire foutre\", which can be translated as above.

JabTrad
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 16
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12 hrs
"go get f...ked" or "f...ck you"


Explanation:
This is a vulgar expression, and bad language. It is often accompanied by "the finger" or is replaced by this same gesture and means basically the same thing.

Even though it seems to be used more and more liberally in English (especially in some movies) I certainly wouldn't use it...

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300
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