départ surpressé

English translation: boost(ed) feed

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:départ surpressé
English translation:boost(ed) feed
Entered by: Tony M

08:54 Jul 25, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Other / Water supplies
French term or phrase: départ surpressé
Concerning untreated water supplied in an office building. 'A partir d'une nourrice principale, l'eau non traitée est dispatchée de la façon suivante : *départ surpressé* eau froide de la zone ... départ non surpressé eau froide pour la cuisine ...'
Sarah Russell
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:28
boost(ed) feed
Explanation:
A 'départ' is some kind of outgoing feed (looked at from the POV of "where it is coming from"), and the 'surpressé' refers to the fact that the water has had its pressure boosted by pumps (cf. the non-surpressé = incoming mains pressure) — this might, for example, be in order to maintain sufficient water pressure on the higher floors of a tall building.

In typical engineering jargon, 'boost feed' would be fine, though more properly, of course it ought literally to be 'boosted'.

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Note added at 15 hrs (2018-07-26 00:20:48 GMT)
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Here are some examples of translations relating to surpresseur / boost in connection with water kindly found for us on the 'Net by Linguee.

By no means all of them are entirely relevant, but there is sufficient consensus for even non-technical experts to surely get the gist?

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Note added at 12 days (2018-08-07 05:02:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, omitted to post the link!

Here it is now — though thee are plenty of other examples to be found

https://www.linguee.fr/francais-anglais/traduction/surpresse...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 09:28
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4boost(ed) feed
Tony M
4powered feed
GILOU
4 -4overpressure start
Mohamed Hosni


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
powered feed


Explanation:
-

GILOU
France
Local time: 09:28
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 21
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -4
overpressure start


Explanation:
Hope it helps.

Mohamed Hosni
Morocco
Local time: 08:28
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Technical non-sense in relation to the context given.
38 mins

disagree  Kevin Oheix: "Départ" is "feed" in this context, not "start".
9 hrs

disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: nonsense
8 days

disagree  AllegroTrans: nonsense
11 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
boost(ed) feed


Explanation:
A 'départ' is some kind of outgoing feed (looked at from the POV of "where it is coming from"), and the 'surpressé' refers to the fact that the water has had its pressure boosted by pumps (cf. the non-surpressé = incoming mains pressure) — this might, for example, be in order to maintain sufficient water pressure on the higher floors of a tall building.

In typical engineering jargon, 'boost feed' would be fine, though more properly, of course it ought literally to be 'boosted'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2018-07-26 00:20:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here are some examples of translations relating to surpresseur / boost in connection with water kindly found for us on the 'Net by Linguee.

By no means all of them are entirely relevant, but there is sufficient consensus for even non-technical experts to surely get the gist?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 days (2018-08-07 05:02:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, omitted to post the link!

Here it is now — though thee are plenty of other examples to be found

https://www.linguee.fr/francais-anglais/traduction/surpresse...


Tony M
France
Local time: 09:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 294
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kevin Oheix: Yes, a "booster" is a "surpresseur", so it makes sense.
57 mins
  -> Merci, Kevin ! Yes, it is of course specifically the pressure that is boosted!

agree  B D Finch
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, B!

agree  philgoddard
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Phil!

agree  AllegroTrans
12 days
  -> Thanks, C!
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