Bagatelle

English translation: minor incident

15:38 Apr 6, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Other
French term or phrase: Bagatelle
Figures in a Quality Manual. The word suggests a "minor" (i.e. trifle) technical hitch or accident - is there a set English term for this?

Nous distinguons deux catégories d'accidents :
Les ***"bagatelles"*** qui concernent les accidents provoquant une incapacité de travail de maximum trois jours ou un traitement ambulatoire...

Non-conformités, accidents et incidents, sécurité et environnement:
Les non-conformités et les accidents sont centralisés dans une base de données, ce qui permet d'en conserver l'historique et de réaliser la synthèse mensuelle pour le Comité Sécurité.
Sont considérés comme tels, tous les écarts entre l'état visé et l'état effectif ou les accidents sans conséquence sur la santé.
Ils sont relevés et corrigés afin d'éviter leur répétition.
On distingue les types d'écarts suivants :
Les ***"bagatelles"*** dues à des négligences ou à un manque de responsabilisation du collaborateur...
pmcd
France
Local time: 10:40
English translation:minor incident
Explanation:
I don't know of a set term, but I would have thought this might serve your purpose?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 43 mins (2005-04-06 17:21:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Clearly, this is related to H&S, but the Asker seems to have cast some doubt as to whether this is referring solely to personal injury (in which case \'accident\' would be most appropriate), or whether in fact it also includes \'technical incidents\' of a more general nature.

The text itself does say: \"Sont considérés comme tels... les accidents sans conséquence sur la santé\", so if we assume it is ONLY personal injury, then \'accident\' would be OK; but if not, a less specific term might be preferable...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 45 mins (2005-04-06 17:23:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

..but it also says \"...tous les écarts entre l\'état visé et l\'état effectif...\", which suggests to me something other than personal injury?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 35 mins (2005-04-06 18:13:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Less than 3 days, in UK and France at least, no doctor\'s certificate is required, and the employer continues to pay salary as normal, rather than invoking sick pay payments; therefore \'relatively insignificant\' from a management procedures point of view!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:40
Grading comment
Many thanks for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +7minor incident
Tony M
4 +2Minor accident
Mozydan
4trivial incidents
CMJ_Trans (X)


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Minor accident


Explanation:
The context is for security at work. In Quebec the CSST defines the "bagatelle" of your text as "Acident mineur" which may require first aid but does not prevent the worker to work the following day of the accident.


    Reference: http://www.csst.qc.ca/portail/fr/employeurs/informations_sup...
Mozydan
Local time: 04:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Didier Fourcot: will probably fit well with the "two categories": minor accidents and...
16 mins

agree  chaplin
16 mins

disagree  David Vaughn: But the text specifically mentions 3 days incapacity! Guess we're not in Quebec ;-))
28 mins
  -> The duration does not affect the two categories. Still seems the same principle to me !!

neutral  Tony M: Problem is, it's not ONLY personal injury, so 'accident' doesn't seem to me to fit comfortably... // Of course it's H&S-related, but Asker implies it may not be ONLY bodily injury...?
30 mins
  -> Maybe, but they keep the records of all to report to the "Comité Sécurité". Still seems to be security related to me !!

agree  RHELLER: in the U.S. we would use accident, not incident (for bodily injury)
45 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
trivial incidents


Explanation:
minor glitches

CMJ_Trans (X)
Local time: 10:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 183

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Although I agree with the sentiment, I think the term 'trivial' might be regarded as too 'judgemental' to put in a safety document /// Quite! But maybe they think they can get away with it better in FR ;-)
22 mins
  -> and what do you think "bagatelle" sounds like?
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
minor incident


Explanation:
I don't know of a set term, but I would have thought this might serve your purpose?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 43 mins (2005-04-06 17:21:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Clearly, this is related to H&S, but the Asker seems to have cast some doubt as to whether this is referring solely to personal injury (in which case \'accident\' would be most appropriate), or whether in fact it also includes \'technical incidents\' of a more general nature.

The text itself does say: \"Sont considérés comme tels... les accidents sans conséquence sur la santé\", so if we assume it is ONLY personal injury, then \'accident\' would be OK; but if not, a less specific term might be preferable...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 45 mins (2005-04-06 17:23:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

..but it also says \"...tous les écarts entre l\'état visé et l\'état effectif...\", which suggests to me something other than personal injury?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 35 mins (2005-04-06 18:13:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Less than 3 days, in UK and France at least, no doctor\'s certificate is required, and the employer continues to pay salary as normal, rather than invoking sick pay payments; therefore \'relatively insignificant\' from a management procedures point of view!

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 294
Grading comment
Many thanks for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Vaughn: Seems best to me of the 3 answers.
44 mins
  -> Thanks, Vaughn!

agree  Karen Tucker
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Karen!

agree  adelinea
56 mins
  -> Thanks, Adelinea!

agree  Ian Burley (X)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Ian!

agree  Jean-Claude Gouin
1 hr
  -> Thanks, 1045!

agree  DocteurPC: this translates the meaning (from the sentence) but a bagatelle is not an appropriate term for something that may require 3 days off! (maybe because they don't pay under 3 days)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Doc!

agree  Kate Hudson
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kate!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search