souffler comme un phoque

English translation: to pant like a dog

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:souffler comme un phoque
English translation:to pant like a dog
Entered by: Sandra C.

21:51 Apr 23, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Slang
French term or phrase: souffler comme un phoque
Two kids are out for a bike ride. The brother says about his sister: La bouche entrouverte, elle soufflait comme un phoque.

I find 'she breathed heavily', even though it's correct, not to be faithful to the source expression.
All ideas welcome!!!
Sandra C.
France
Local time: 16:17
panting like a dog
Explanation:
After a run, I pant like a dog too. (I'm out of shape!)Another suggestion, and it has the animal in it too.

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Note added at 13 mins (2005-04-23 22:05:04 GMT)
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Look at section called Mountain Biking Paradise in the link:

http://www.icdc.com/~neubauer/tahoe.htm-32k
Selected response from:

Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 16:17
Grading comment
Thanks Gayle!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5panting like a dog
Gayle Wallimann
4 +1puffing like a grampus
Tony M
3gasping like a clubbed seal
Charlie Bavington (X)
3puffing like a steam engine
Laurel Porter (X)
3Panting like a Shire horse
cchat


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
puffing like a steam engine


Explanation:
Just a starter... A bit old-fashioned, I think.

Laurel Porter (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Panting like a Shire horse


Explanation:
panting like a stranded (or beached)whale
or virtually any other animal you choose.

cchat
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gayle Wallimann: Whales don't pant.
15 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
panting like a dog


Explanation:
After a run, I pant like a dog too. (I'm out of shape!)Another suggestion, and it has the animal in it too.

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Note added at 13 mins (2005-04-23 22:05:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Look at section called Mountain Biking Paradise in the link:

http://www.icdc.com/~neubauer/tahoe.htm-32k

Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 16:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks Gayle!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  swisstell
9 mins
  -> Thanks, SwissTell.

agree  Laurel Porter (X): This works for me! (Mine was a standard phrase, but outmoded.)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Laurel.

agree  French Foodie
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mara.

agree  Estelle Demontrond-Box
17 hrs

agree  Andrée Goreux: It is the same in Spanish: jadear como un perro. Do seals pant, anyway? I wonder.
20 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
gasping like a clubbed seal


Explanation:
not a particularly pleasant image, perhaps, but I'm not entirely sure that "phoque" is necessarily meant to be entirely flattering either :-) Anyway, it just sprang into my mind, so I'm sharing it with you.


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Note added at 1 day 14 hrs 51 mins (2005-04-25 12:42:31 GMT)
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This is really not intended as a \"linguistically neutral\" option. But you are doing a book, and as such it\'s the overall picture/effect that counts (IMO). So if the needle between boy & girl is generally unpleasant, you could use this. Or if the boy is meant to be an unsymathetic character, you could use this. Particularly as a counterbalance, if you have had to tone down some other words or phrases.

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Note added at 1 day 14 hrs 53 mins (2005-04-25 12:44:48 GMT)
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typo - unsympathetic

Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Laurel Porter (X): I have no idea how this agree from me got on here! The "clubbed seal" thing is a horrible thing to say, and I'd never suggest using it in a translation unless the aim was to shock. Sorry! 8-)
2 mins
  -> Yep, it's meant to be unpleasant. To be used with caution :-) See extra note above, explaining that it might be best used with a view to obtaining a cumulative effect, rather as a standalone equivalent. I should've made that clearer, perhaps.

neutral  writeaway: what a disgusting answer!! this actually came to mind?
702 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
puffing like a grampus


Explanation:
I think that's the direct equivalent UK English expression, though it may not suit your context (US?)

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Note added at 10 hrs 23 mins (2005-04-24 08:14:30 GMT)
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Well, it IS a pretty old-fashioned expression, but picturesque, I\'ve always thought. CB\'s peer comment made me stop and think, since this is a word often used in our family, but maybe it\'s not a \'real\' word? But yes, here\'s how OED defines it:

grampus

1 Any of various blowing, spouting, blunt-nosed cetaceans of the family Delphinidae; esp. (a) Risso’s dolphin, Grampus griseus; (b) the killer whale, Orcinus orca.

2 A person given to puffing and blowing.

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Note added at 22 hrs 18 mins (2005-04-24 20:09:39 GMT)
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The trouble is, I believe this expression is more than JUST \'panting\'; the kind of noise that seals, grampuses etc. make isn\'t really like a pant (in the way that dogs and horses do), so much as a cough; that\'s maybe why the idea is BOTH puffing AND panting. I think any expression with just \'panting\' alone is diluting the original meaning.... it\'s all about heavy breathing...

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Note added at 22 hrs 52 mins (2005-04-24 20:43:40 GMT)
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I think my Dad would be proud to know that one of his favourite expressions has received such acclaim! ;-))

I was such a fat, asthmatic, unfit child (nothing changes...) that he very often used to taunt me with this.

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Note added at 1 day 16 hrs 31 mins (2005-04-25 14:22:37 GMT) Post-grading
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I fully accept that my own suggestion is not appropriate for Asker\'s needs, and I\'m certainly not here to pick holes in other people\'s suggestions.

Nonetheless, I honestly do feel that any solution using \'panting\' is missing some of the \'feeling\' of the original. True, after exertion, one is likely to pant; but dogs in particular are noted for panting with excited anticipation, for example: \'panting at the leash\'. But here, I\'m assuming this is during the bike ride, and it says \'with her mouth half open, she was breathing heavily\'. Surely the whole intention here is the fact that this is laboured breathing, probably slow, maybe in the same rhythm as the bicycle pedals? I really feel panting (= fast breathing) is missing the mark here, and you need something along the lines of \'puffing and blowing like an old (something)\'

Doesn\'t ANYONE see what I\'m getting at? :-(

Tony M
France
Local time: 16:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charlie Bavington (X): cripes, I've learnt a new word today (and I'm a UK bod). I've only ever heard grampus in reference to a Japanese football team...:-) (which presumably therefore needs to be filed in the same category as their canned drink called "sweat")
1 hr
  -> Cheers, CB! ;-)

agree  Gabrielle Lyons: I immediately thought of 'puffing like a walrus'.
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gabrielle! Not heard that one myself...

neutral  Gayle Wallimann: New to me too. It wouldn't do for US context, if that's the target. But I like it too, and will add it to my vocab if only to bug my kids (another one of those ProZ.com words!)
18 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gayle§ I agree that it wouldn' t do for US --- but of course Asker hasn't told us...... /// :-))

neutral  Laurel Porter (X): What, do I not count, Dusty? ;-) I said "puffing" too! Aha - I was away from the computer. I agree with you to a degree, however!
1 day 19 hrs
  -> Sorry, yes, got you now! Yes, OF COURSE you count; I just didn't think that anyone else felt the way I did about the difference, and you weren't among the people who'd commented on my suggestion ;-) /// Thanks! :-)
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