famille recomposée

English translation: blended family / reconstituted family

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:famille recomposée
English translation:blended family / reconstituted family
Entered by: Anne-Marie Grant (X)

19:42 Jun 20, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc. / family type
French term or phrase: famille recomposée
I suppose that this is a neat way of decribing a family unit where one or both partners live together with children from previous relationships.
Is there is similar neat way of translating this into English?
David Hayes
France
Local time: 10:54
blended family
Explanation:
http://www.allaboutlifechallenges.org/blended-families.htm

This is how I've heard them described.

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-06-20 20:44:06 GMT)
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Although both the suggested answers make it sound as though we're talking about custard!

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Note added at 14 hrs (2009-06-21 10:23:00 GMT) Post-grading
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David - to me, second family would be used in the context of someone remarrying/living with a new partner and starting another family. The children of the two different relationships would not be raised together.

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Note added at 1 day3 hrs (2009-06-21 23:19:59 GMT) Post-grading
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Google 'blended family' and 'reconstituted family' and they both get millions of hits. If you're worried about the term not being understood, you could always explain it in your translation the first time you use it. I'm not sure that composite family is any clearer. Anyway - it's your decision!
Selected response from:

Anne-Marie Grant (X)
Local time: 09:54
Grading comment
First validated answer (validated by peer agreement)



Summary of answers provided
4 +4reconstituted family
polyglot45
4 +4blended family
Anne-Marie Grant (X)
3step family
Nikki Scott-Despaigne


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2, peer agreement (net) from those meeting criteria: +2
reconstituted family


Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstituted_family

also occasionally called 'recomposed'

polyglot45
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 22
Grading comment
First validated answer (validated by peer agreement)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valentina Viganò
4 mins

agree  Emanuela Galdelli: yes, recomposed too
7 mins

agree  writeaway (meets criteria): you don't meet the criteria-so guess what-your answer is right but it doesn't even count!
3 hrs
  -> what is this weird system?

agree  Valerie SYKES (meets criteria): 'Reconstituted' seems to be widely used, but there are also plenty of entries on gogle for 'recomposed'.
13 hrs
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
step family


Explanation:
Used commonly, even if the new family is not one in which the couple have remarried.

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 10:54
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1, peer agreement (net) from those meeting criteria: +3
blended family


Explanation:
http://www.allaboutlifechallenges.org/blended-families.htm

This is how I've heard them described.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-06-20 20:44:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although both the suggested answers make it sound as though we're talking about custard!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2009-06-21 10:23:00 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

David - to me, second family would be used in the context of someone remarrying/living with a new partner and starting another family. The children of the two different relationships would not be raised together.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day3 hrs (2009-06-21 23:19:59 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Google 'blended family' and 'reconstituted family' and they both get millions of hits. If you're worried about the term not being understood, you could always explain it in your translation the first time you use it. I'm not sure that composite family is any clearer. Anyway - it's your decision!

Anne-Marie Grant (X)
Local time: 09:54
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
First validated answer (validated by peer agreement)
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your suggestions. I agree that 'blended family' and 'reconstituted family' have connotations of custard! I have simply never heard of these terms being used in English. By contrast, 'famille recomposée' does seem to be part of everyday language in French (although it is not in any of my dictionnaries. There are entries, both French and English, in Wikipedia, of course). I have heard the French term used on a number of occasions on the TF1 news that I watch most evenings. Obviously there are some things that just don't carry over into other langauges. In this case, my own hunch is just to sidestep the problem and not seek a direct equivalent. I wonder if one could get away with 'second family'?

Asker: Thanks, Anne-Marie. Yes, I can see the problem with 'second family'. But I simply don't like the sound of 'blended' and 'reconstituted' and I doubt that these terms would be widely understood by most Ebglish people. Someone else has submitted 'step family', which seems to have a different sense to me. I'm now wondering about 'composite family', which at least sounds a bit better.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jenn Mercer
1 hr

agree  Jill Ananyi (meets criteria): Yes. This is quite common in the U.S.
1 hr

agree  Gabrielle Leyden (meets criteria): Definitely what I found when I was working on the subject. NOT "reconstituted"
18 hrs

agree  Jocelyne S (meets criteria): The term is widely understood in N. America at least.
1 day 9 hrs
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