mobile

01:29 Dec 23, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: mobile
General context, talking about current and future work trends. It is used to contrast with ""posté", which I have translated as shiftworker.

Could it "freelancer", or "contractor"? Could someone please confirm or otherwise.

Thanks in advance
Rod
rod


Summary of answers provided
na"temps"
Angela Arnone
nafreelancer
Kika
nanomad, wired worker
Dana Carciumaru


  

Answers


6 hrs
nomad, wired worker


Explanation:
mobile s CORRECT,MASC/FEM
itinérant s CORRECT,NOUN,MASC
inforoutard s PROPOSAL,MASC
OBS - inforoutard: de «inforoute» et «routard» (personne qui prend la route, vagabonde librement). Voir aussi internaute, cybernaute et infonaute.

mobile s CORRECT,MASC/FEM
itinérant s CORRECT,NOUN,MASC
inforoutard s PROPOSAL,MASC
OBS - inforoutard: de «inforoute» et «routard» (personne qui prend la route, vagabonde librement). Voir aussi internaute, cybernaute et infonaute. s


    Reference: http://www.termium.com
Dana Carciumaru
Canada
Local time: 14:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 38
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6 hrs
freelancer


Explanation:
A "freelancer" is a person who sells services without working on a regular basis for any single employer, while a "contractor" is one who agrees to furnish supplies or perform work, esp. in construction, so the choice between the two depends a lot on the context.

Another possible translation for the term "mobile" is
"temporary worker"...

Kika

Kika
Local time: 20:55
PRO pts in pair: 12
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10 hrs
"temps"


Explanation:
If the French employment situation resembles that in Italy, the current trend is not for anything as "highflown" as a contractor or freelance (which imply that the worker has chosen to be independent). It simply indicates that no business will hire when they have the possibility of temporary workers who they can re-confirm or not, as required. You'll need to read betwen the lines of the rest of your text to see if this is what they mean.
In my day (stone-age) these were called "temps".
Ciao
Angela


Angela Arnone
Local time: 20:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad
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